If you have migraine, your doctor may prescribe Ubrelvy for you.

Ubrelvy is a prescription drug that’s used in adults for immediate migraine treatment. But it’s important to that know Ubrelvy isn’t used to prevent migraine symptoms.

With migraine, you can have several symptoms, including severe headaches. And these headaches may occur with or without visual or sensory changes called an aura. Ubrelvy works to treat immediate migraine episodes that happen with or without an aura.

Ubrelvy comes as tablets you’ll take by mouth.

The active drug in Ubrelvy is ubrogepant. This active ingredient doesn’t come as a generic medication. Instead, it’s only available as the brand-name drug Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy belongs to a group of drugs called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists. It’s the only CGRP antagonist that comes as tablets you’ll take by mouth. Taking Ubrelvy is more convenient than taking other CGRP antagonists that need to be injected.

Read on if you’d like to know more about Ubrelvy’s cost, side effects, uses, and more.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Ubrelvy in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Ubrelvy manufacturer’s website to see if it offers support options.

The side effects of a drug can vary from person to person. And they depend on:

  • your age
  • your overall health
  • other medications you may be taking
  • the dosage of medication you’re taking
  • other factors

Like most drugs, Ubrelvy may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Ubrelvy may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the possible side effects of Ubrelvy. They can also suggest ways to help reduce the drug’s side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Ubrelvy can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist or read Ubrelvy’s patient information.

Mild side effects* of Ubrelvy can include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about these mild side effects, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Ubrelvy can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Ubrelvy, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

In rare cases, some people may experience an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy. The most severe type of allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis, may be life threatening. For more information about allergic reaction, see the “Side effect focus” section just below.

Side effect focus

Before starting Ubrelvy, be sure to discuss any concerns you have about side effects with your doctor. This will help you decide together if taking the medication is right for you.

Here’s some information about some side effects of Ubrelvy.

Sleepiness

You may feel tired or sleepy while taking Ubrelvy. This is a common side effect of the drug. In studies, this was reported more often with a higher dosage of the drug than with a lower dosage.

Keep in mind that migraine, which Ubrelvy is used to treat, can lead to tiredness and fatigue (lack of energy). So, it’s important to ask your doctor or pharmacist what you can expect with Ubrelvy treatment.

What might help

Until you become familiar with how Ubrelvy affects you, use caution when participating in activities during which you’ll need to be mentally alert or focused. This could include activities such as driving or operating machinery.

If this is a concern for you, ask your doctor for tips on how to help. They may recommend things like taking a walk or trying energizing deep breathing exercises.

Dizziness

In rare cases, Ubrelvy may make you dizzy. And certain symptoms of migraine, which Ubrelvy is used to treat, may cause or worsen dizziness. These migraine symptoms include tiredness, fatigue (lack of energy), nausea, and vomiting.

What might help

While your body gets used to Ubrelvy, try the following things to help manage dizziness:

  • Lie down until your dizziness goes away.
  • To avoid falling, be careful when standing up from a sitting position.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about other ways to help manage dizziness while you’re using Ubrelvy.

Nausea

You may have nausea while you’re taking Ubrelvy. In studies, nausea was the most commonly reported side effect of Ubrelvy.

But keep in mind that migraine, which Ubrelvy is used to treat, can also cause nausea and vomiting. So, it’s important to discuss with your doctor how treatment with Ubrelvy may affect you.

What might help

If you’re concerned about having nausea, talk with your doctor before taking Ubrelvy. They can recommend some things to help ease nausea.

For instance, your doctor may suggest things like:

Dry mouth

It’s possible to have xerostomia (dry mouth) with Ubrelvy treatment. This occurs when there’s not enough saliva in your mouth. And it can cause uncomfortable effects, including cracked lips, a dry throat, and bad breath.

What might help

Some simple tips that may help relieve your dry mouth symptoms include the following:

  • Drink more water than usual.
  • Limit your intake of caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol.
  • Cut down on salt and sugar intake.
  • Use an over-the-counter mouthwash.

Be sure to talk with your doctor if dry mouth bothers you while you’re using Ubrelvy. They may offer more suggestions to help relieve this side effect.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • a rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

If you have migraine, your doctor may recommend treatment with Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy is used for immediate treatment of migraine symptoms in adults. Ubrelvy isn’t meant for use in children. And Ubrelvy isn’t used to prevent migraine symptoms.

With migraine, you can have symptoms such as severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and visual or sensory changes called an aura. Ubrelvy can treat migraine episodes that happen with or without an aura.

Ubrelvy works to relieve migraine symptoms by blocking the activity of a specific protein in your body.

Sometimes, doctors treat conditions other than migraine with Ubrelvy. Doing so would be using the drug off-label. (With off-label drug use, a drug that’s approved for certain conditions is used for another condition.)

If you have questions about how Ubrelvy is used, talk with your doctor.

Below, we answer some common questions related to Ubrelvy use.

What are some alternatives to Ubrelvy?

There are many different types of migraine treatments available. Some come over the counter, but others are given only by prescription.

Some of these medications prevent migraine episodes from happening. But others, like Ubrelvy, treat migraine episodes when they’re happening.

Some examples of medications that prevent migraine episodes include:

And a few examples of medications that treat migraine episodes when they’re happening include:

Talk with your doctor about the best treatment options to help manage your migraine symptoms.

How does Ubrelvy compare with Imitrex?

Ubrelvy and Imitrex are two different types of migraine medications. They’re both used for immediate treatment of migraine symptoms. Imitrex is also prescribed for cluster headaches.

Ubrelvy belongs to a group of drugs called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists. It works by blocking a specific protein in your body. (To learn more about how Ubrelvy works, see the “How does Ubrelvy work?” question below.) Imitrex, on the other hand, belongs to a group of drugs called serotonin 1 receptor agonists. It works by increasing your serotonin levels and narrowing blood vessels in your brain.

Ubrelvy is a newer medication, and it’s only available as a brand-name drug. It doesn’t come as a generic drug. But Imitrex has been around for a longer period of time. And it’s available in both brand-name and generic versions.

While Ubrelvy only comes as an oral tablet, Imitrex comes as an injectable solution, a nasal spray, and an oral tablet.

These two medications have different side effects, but they also have a few similar side effects. Their similar side effects include nausea and dry mouth. To learn more about the side effects of Imitrex, view the prescribing information for the injectable solution, nasal spray, or oral tablet. And for more information about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see the “What are Ubrelvy’s side effects?” section above.

Keep in mind that not every medication works for every person. So, having different treatment choices can help you and your doctor find the best option for you. If you have questions about the differences between Ubrelvy and Imitrex and wonder how they might help your migraine symptoms, talk with your doctor.

How does Ubrelvy work?

Ubrelvy belongs to a group of drugs called CGRP antagonists. These drugs work by blocking the effects of a protein in your body called CGRP. Studies show that this protein plays a big role in triggering migraine symptoms.

Because CGRP is responsible for pain and inflammation tied to migraine, scientists believe that medications such as Ubrelvy work by blocking CGRP. Levels of CGRP go up during migraine episodes. And Ubrelvy helps bring these levels down.

If you have more questions about how Ubrelvy works, talk with your doctor.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Ubrelvy. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often to take it. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are some commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking Ubrelvy

Ubrelvy comes as tablets you’ll take by mouth. The drug can be taken with or without food. And it should be taken as soon as you feel a migraine episode starting.

Dosage

You’ll take a dose of Ubrelvy when you need immediate treatment for a migraine episode. Then, you can take a second dose 2 hours after your first dose, if needed. But in any case, you shouldn’t take more than 200 milligrams of the drug within a 24-hour timeframe.

Also, you shouldn’t take Ubrelvy for more than eight migraine episodes in 30 days. The safety of taking Ubrelvy more often than this isn’t known. So, talk with your doctor about how often you should take this drug.

It’s important to note that you should avoid taking a second dose of Ubrelvy if you’ve drank any grapefruit juice or ate any grapefruit within 24 hours of your first dose. Doing so may increase the side effects of Ubrelvy. This is because grapefruit makes the drug stay in your body for longer than usual.

Questions about taking Ubrelvy

Here are some answers to a few common questions related to taking Ubrelvy:

  • What if I miss a dose of Ubrelvy? Ubrelvy is taken for immediate treatment of migraine symptoms. It’s not meant to be used for migraine prevention. So, you don’t have to take it every day. Instead, you’ll just take it when you need it.
  • Will I need to take Ubrelvy long term? If Ubrelvy works well for you, your doctor may recommend that you take it long term, as needed, for migraine episodes. You should discuss your migraine treatment plan with your doctor.
  • Can Ubrelvy be chewed, crushed, or split? No, you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew Ubrelvy tablets. It’s not known if doing these things will change how the medication works. If you have trouble swallowing pills, talk with your doctor about other treatment options.
  • Should I take Ubrelvy with food? You can take Ubrelvy with or without food. But keep in mind that both Ubrelvy and migraine may cause nausea. So, you’ll have to see how well your body tolerates Ubrelvy either with food or on an empty stomach.
  • How long does Ubrelvy take to work? Ubrelvy starts to work quickly. Most people get relief from migraine symptoms within 2 hours of taking a dose. And the effects of Ubrelvy may last for up to a day or longer.

It’s important to talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of taking Ubrelvy. Some considerations of using this drug are described below.

Interactions

Using certain medications, vitamins, or foods alongside certain drugs can affect how they all work. These effects are called interactions.

Interactions can change a drug’s effect in your body. And this can lead to two possible outcomes:

  • the drug’s effect being lowered so that it doesn’t work as well as usual
  • the drug’s effect being raised so that it lasts for longer in your body and may cause increased side effects

Before taking Ubrelvy, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take (including prescription and over-the-counter types). Also, describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Ubrelvy.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Ubrelvy can interact with certain drugs in a way that leads to increased effects of Ubrelvy in your body. These drugs include:

Ubrelvy can also interact with certain medications in a way that leads to lower effects of Ubrelvy in your body. These drugs include:

These lists do not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Ubrelvy. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of Ubrelvy.

Other interactions

In addition to the medications described above, Ubrelvy can also interact with other substances. For example:

Warnings

Ubrelvy may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Ubrelvy. Some factors to consider include those in the list below:

  • Liver or kidney disease. If you have problems with kidney or liver function, your body may not be able to clear Ubrelvy like usual. And this could increase the amount of Ubrelvy in your body, thereby increasing side effects from the drug. Depending on how your kidney and liver are working, your doctor may adjust your dosage of Ubrelvy. Your doctor can also order blood tests to check the health of your liver and your kidneys before prescribing Ubrelvy to you.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take the drug. Ask your doctor about which other medications are better options for you.

Use with alcohol

There aren’t any known interactions between Ubrelvy and alcohol. But using both together may increase some side effects of Ubrelvy. These can include:

  • nausea
  • dry mouth
  • dizziness
  • tiredness

Also, keep in mind that for some people, alcohol can increase the risk of a migraine episode.

Talk with your doctor about what you should know about drinking alcohol while using Ubrelvy.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

There’s not enough information available about the effects of using Ubrelvy during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. So, if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, talk with your doctor about the safety of taking Ubrelvy.

Don’t take more Ubrelvy than your doctor prescribes. Doing so can lead to serious side effects.

It takes your body around 5 to 7 hours to clear Ubrelvy after you’ve taken a dose of the drug. But if you have liver or kidney problems, the drug could last for longer in your system.

In any case, don’t take more Ubrelvy than your doctor prescribes.

What to do in case you take too much Ubrelvy

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Ubrelvy. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or you can use their online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

Before starting Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this drug. And keep in mind that there are many different options for migraine treatment and prevention. Some of these options include natural remedies, while others include alternative medications.

Here are a few resources on migraine that you might find helpful to explore:

Ubrelvy is a fairly new medication, so you may have questions about how it works and how it’s used for migraine. A few questions you might consider asking your doctor include:

  • Does food slow down how long it takes Ubrelvy to start working?
  • How many doses of Ubrelvy can I take in 1 day?
  • Will Ubrelvy make me too sleepy to drive or work?

To learn more about migraine symptoms and the latest treatments, sign up for our migraine newsletter.

Q:

Can I take Ubrelvy with acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin)?

Anonymous patient

A:

There aren’t any known interactions between Ubrelvy and acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin). But you should only take Ubrelvy with an additional pain medication like these if your doctor says to do so. Keep in mind that Ubrelvy is approved to treat a migraine episode on its own without other drugs.

Dena Westphalen, PharmDAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.
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