If you have migraine, your doctor may suggest Reyvow.

It’s a prescription drug used in adults to treat migraine episodes while they’re happening. It’s not used to prevent episodes of migraine.

Migraine is a condition that can cause moderate to severe headaches, in addition to other symptoms.

To learn more about migraine and how Reyvow is used for it, see the “Is Reyvow used for migraine?” section below.

Reyvow basics

Reyvow comes as tablets that contains the active ingredient lasmiditan. You’ll take Reyvow by mouth.

Reyvow is a brand-name drug. There’s no generic form of this medication.

In this article, we describe Reyvow’s side effects, uses, and more.

Like most drugs, Reyvow may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Reyvow may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you’re taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Reyvow. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Reyvow can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist or read Reyvow’s medication guide.

Mild side effects of Reyvow that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Reyvow can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Reyvow, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Reyvow that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Reyvow may cause.

Dizziness

Because of how Reyvow works, it may make you feel dizzy. In studies, dizziness was the most common side effect reported in people who took Reyvow. This side effect was even more common in people who took higher doses of the drug.

Dizziness may happen more often in people ages 65 years and older. Dizziness can lead to falls or serious injuries such as bone fractures.

What might help

After you take a dose of Reyvow, it may be helpful to sit or lie down for a while. You may not feel dizzy while you’re resting or napping.

Because Reyvow can cause dizziness and sleepiness, you shouldn’t drive for at least 8 hours after you take your dose.

If you develop bothersome dizziness with Reyvow, tell your doctor. They may suggest a lower dose or a different treatment option. And they’ll determine if there are ways to help reduce your dizziness.

Sleepiness

Reyvow can make you feel sleepy. This was reported as a common side effect in studies.

You shouldn’t take Reyvow unless you can avoid driving for the next 8 hours. Even if you don’t feel sleepy, the drug can make you less alert for up to 8 hours.

What might help

It may not be possible to prevent sleepiness after you take Reyvow. It’s a good idea to lie down and rest after you take the drug, if you’re able.

If you take Reyvow with other medications or substances that cause sleepiness, it may make this side effect worse. Before taking other medications with Reyvow, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Rebound headaches

It’s possible to get rebound headaches (also known as medication-overuse headaches) while you’re taking Reyvow. Rebound headaches happen when headaches are treated with too much pain medication, get worse, and happen more often.

Reyvow is a medication that’s used to treat a migraine episode while it’s happening. But taking Reyvow on 10 or more days each month can cause rebound headaches in some people.

Rebound headaches can also happen with other drugs used to treat migraine episodes while they’re happening. Some examples include triptans, opioids, over-the-counter pain relievers, or a combination of these.

What might help

You can help prevent rebound headaches by taking Reyvow on fewer than 10 days each month. In fact, taking more than four doses of Reyvow in 30 days may not be safe. If you feel that you need to take more than four doses within 30 days, talk with your doctor.

If you get rebound headaches with Reyvow, your doctor will likely suggest that you stop taking the drug. This may cause your headaches to return temporarily.

To avoid taking Reyvow too often, use a calendar to keep track of the days you take it for migraine episodes.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Reyvow.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • sensitivity to sunlight
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Reyvow. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Yes, Reyvow is used in adults to treat migraine episodes while they’re happening.

Migraine is a condition that can cause moderate to severe headaches, in addition to other symptoms.

Migraine headaches are a type of moderate to severe headache, and they typically affect one side of your head. Usually, people with migraine episodes also have nausea and are sensitive to sound and light.

Some people with migraine develop certain symptoms that begin a day or two before the headache itself. This is known as an aura or prodrome. Symptoms can include:

It’s important to note that Reyvow doesn’t prevent migraine episodes. Instead, it’s used to treat the episodes while they’re happening.

Reyvow treats migraine episodes by targeting and activating specific receptors (binding sites) for serotonin in your brain. These receptors are thought to be involved in blocking pain signals.

Find answers to some common questions about Reyvow.

What should I know about Reyvow vs. Ubrelvy, Nurtec ODT, or triptans?

All of these drugs are used for migraine, but they come in different forms.

For instance, Nurtec and some triptans come as orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs), which dissolve inside your mouth. Some triptans come as nasal sprays or solutions that are given as an injection under your skin. Ubrelvy and Reyvow come as tablets that you swallow.

Also, these medications work in different ways. Reyvow and triptans work on different types of serotonin receptors (binding sites). Each of these receptors play different roles in migraine pain relief.

Unlike triptans, Reyvow doesn’t activate a certain receptor that causes blood vessels to constrict (tighten). This constriction may help relieve migraine pain. But it can be dangerous for people with health problems related to their blood vessels.

Ubrelvy and Nurtec ODT belong to a different group of migraine drugs than Reyvow and triptans. They’re called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) blockers. CGRP is a protein that plays a role in migraine episodes, and CGRP blockers help block them.

To learn more about the differences between Reyvow, Ubrelvy, Nurtec ODT, and triptans, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

How does Reyvow work?

Reyvow’s exact mechanism of action (how it works) for relieving migraine isn’t fully understood.

Reyvow contains the drug lasmiditan. It targets and activates certain serotoninreceptors (binding sites). These receptors are thought to be involved in blocking pain signals.

Some experts think that by activating these receptors, lasmiditan controls the release of a protein that plays a role in migraine pain.

Can Reyvow make you feel ‘high’?

Reyvow doesn’t usually make you feel “high” at doses prescribed by doctors, but the drug can have this effect.

In studies of Reyvow, some people reported euphoric mood (feeling high or intensely happy) as a rare side effect. This side effect occurred more often with higher doses of the drug.

In the United States, Reyvow is a controlled substance. This is because it has an approved medical use but may sometimes be misused to make a person feel high. (With misuse, a drug is taken in a different way or for other reasons than it was prescribed.)

Keep in mind that taking more Reyvow than you’ve been prescribed can cause rebound headaches (headaches caused by overuse of migraine medications). For more information about this, see the “Can Reyvow be misused?” section below.

Be sure to take this medication exactly as your doctor prescribes.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Reyvow. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking Reyvow

Reyvow comes as a tablet that you’ll take by mouth. It comes in strengths of 50 milligrams (mg), 100 mg, and 200 mg.

Dosage

You should only take one dose of Reyvow per 24 hours. And you should take the drug only when you’re having a migraine episode.

Note: Reyvow can make you feel sleepy. So, you should wait at least 8 hours after taking Reyvow before driving or doing activities that require you to be alert.

Taking Reyvow with other drugs

If your migraine headache doesn’t get better after taking Reyvow, you may need to take other pain medications.

But before taking any other drugs with Reyvow, be sure to check with your doctor. Ask them which pain relievers are safe for you to take if Reyvow doesn’t relieve your migraine headache.

The following pain relievers are typically safe in most people:

Questions about taking Reyvow

Here’s a list of common questions related to taking Reyvow:

  • What if I miss a dose of Reyvow? You shouldn’t take more than one dose of Reyvow per 24 hours. If you still have a lot of migraine pain a few hours after taking Reyvow, don’t take another dose. Talk with your doctor about how to manage migraine pain that doesn’t go away after taking Reyvow.
  • Will I need to use Reyvow long term? You may need to take Reyvow long term if you continue to have migraine episodes. Taking more than four doses in 30 days may not be safe. If you need to take more than four doses in 30 days, talk with your doctor.
  • Can I chew, crush, or split Reyvow? No, you must take Reyvow tablets whole. Don’t chew, crush, or split them. If you have trouble swallowing Reyvow tablets whole, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Should I take Reyvow with food? You can take Reyvow with or without food. It doesn’t change how the drug works.
  • How long does Reyvow take to work? You may have pain relief from your migraine within 2 hours after taking Reyvow.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Reyvow and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will Reyvow affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So, don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Some important things to discuss with your doctor when considering Reyvow treatment include your overall health and any medical conditions you have. Tell your doctor if you’re taking other medications. This is important since some drugs can interfere with Reyvow.

These and other things to discuss with your doctor are described below.

Interactions

Using medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Reyvow, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also, describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Reyvow.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Reyvow can interact with several types of drugs. Some examples of these drugs include:

This list doesn’t contain all types of drugs that may interact with Reyvow. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of Reyvow.

Warnings

Reyvow may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Reyvow. Factors to consider include those in the list below:

  • Liver problems. Tell your doctor if you have problems with your liver, such as liver failure. It’s not known whether Reyvow is safe for people with liver failure. You shouldn’t take Reyvow if you have severe liver failure.
  • Low heart rate. If you have a low heart rate, Reyvow may not be right for you. Tell your doctor if you have a low heart rate or are taking a medication that lowers your heart rate. Reyvow can lower your heart rate by 5 to 10 beats per minute.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Reyvow or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take the drug. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • High blood pressure. Reyvow can temporarily increase your blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you have high blood pressure or are taking medications to lower your blood pressure. Your doctor may recommend that you check your blood pressure after taking Reyvow.
  • Ischemic heart disease. People with ischemic heart disease have narrowed heart arteries. There aren’t any studies of Reyvow use in people with ischemic heart disease. Tell your doctor if you have problems with your heart or arteries.

Reyvow and alcohol

Taking Reyvow while drinking alcohol isn’t recommended because the combination may be dangerous.

This is because they both cause sleepiness and dizziness. And drinking alcohol can further increase sleepiness and dizziness from Reyvow.

Also, like alcohol, Reyvow can impair your ability to drive safely. Even if you don’t feel sleepy, both alcohol and Reyvow can make you less alert. You shouldn’t drive or operate heavy machinery for at least 8 hours after you take a dose of Reyvow.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about alcohol use while taking Reyvow.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Reyvow use hasn’t been studied in pregnant people. Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant before starting Reyvow treatment.

There’s also not much information on whether Reyvow is found in breast milk or if it affects children who are breastfed. And it’s not known if Reyvow affects how much breast milk your body makes.

You should tell your doctor if you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. They can help you evaluate the benefits of breastfeeding and your treatment options.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Reyvow in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Reyvow manufacturer’s website to see if it offers any support options.

It’s possible for Reyvow to be misused. With misuse, a drug is taken in a different way or for other reasons than it was prescribed.

It’s rare but possible to feel “high” or euphoric (having intense happiness) or to have hallucinations with Reyvow. (Hallucinations mean you see or hear things that aren’t really there.)

While these side effects are rare, some people may misuse Reyvow in order to feel these effects. So, your doctor may monitor you for misuse while you’re taking this drug.

In the United States, Reyvow is a controlled substance. This is because it has an approved medical use but may sometimes be misused to make a person feel high.

Your doctor will evaluate your risk for drug misuse before they prescribe Reyvow. They may also need to evaluate your risk for misusing Reyvow during treatment.

Keep in mind that taking more Reyvow than you’ve been prescribed can cause rebound headaches (headaches caused by overuse of migraine medications). Reyvow is used to treat migraine headaches. But taking the drug too often may increase your risk for rebound headaches. And it isn’t known if it’s safe to take more than four doses of Reyvow within 30 days.

If you need to take more than four doses of Reyvow in 30 days, talk with your doctor. Be sure to take this medication exactly as your doctor prescribes.

Don’t take more Reyvow than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects. If you take too much Reyvow, tell your doctor. They can closely monitor you for overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Reyvow

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Reyvow. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or you can use its online resource. However, if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you have questions about taking Reyvow, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Your doctor can also tell you about other treatments for migraine.

Some questions to ask your doctor about Reyvow may include:

  • Can I use Reyvow to prevent migraine episodes?
  • What should I do if my migraine headache comes back after taking Reyvow?
  • Can I take a triptan the same day as Reyvow if my headache returns?
  • What should I do if I vomit immediately after taking Reyvow?

Here are a couple of articles you might find helpful:

You can also learn more by subscribing to Healthline’s migraine newsletter.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.