If you have erectile dysfunction (ED), your doctor may recommend that you take Viagra. It’s a prescription drug that’s used in adult males* with ED.

With ED, you have trouble getting or keeping an erection.

To find out more about how Viagra is used for ED, see the “What is Viagra used for?” section below. Read on to learn more about how Viagra works, how long it lasts, its side effects, and more.

* In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Viagra basics

The active drug in Viagra is sildenafil. It belongs to a group of drugs called phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

Viagra comes as tablets you take by mouth. You’ll only need to take it as needed, before having sex. You don’t need to take Viagra regularly each day.

Viagra generic form

Viagra is a brand-name medication. It’s also available in a generic form called sildenafil.

You may wonder if women can take Viagra. This drug isn’t approved for use in females.* Instead, Viagra is approved only to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) in adult males.*

There have been some questions about whether Viagra may work in females with decreased libido (low sex drive) or sexual arousal disorder. But the drug is not approved for these uses because there’s not enough information to show if it works for them.

At this time, it’s not known if Viagra is a safe or effective medication in females.

* In this article, we use the terms “male” and “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Common questions about Viagra use in women

Below are some questions related to Viagra use in females.*

* In this article, we use the term “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

What happens if a woman takes Viagra?

It’s not known exactly what may happen if a female takes Viagra. Currently, there are mixed reviews about the effects of the drug in females.

For example, one study showed that Viagra increased arousal, lubrication, and orgasm in females. But another study showed that Viagra didn’t cause these outcomes.

So currently, there’s not enough information to know for sure if Viagra is safe or effective in females. If you’d like to know more about how Viagra affects females, talk with your doctor.

How long does Viagra take to start working in women?

It’s not known how long it may take Viagra to start working in females. This is because the drug is not approved for use in females. It’s also not known if Viagra is effective in females.

In males, Viagra usually works within about 1 hour after it’s taken. But this doesn’t indicate how soon the drug may work if it’s taken by females.

If you’re interested in knowing more about this, talk with your doctor.

How long does Viagra last in women?

It’s not known how long Viagra may last in females, because the drug isn’t approved for use in females. More studies are needed to know about Viagra use in females and how long it may last.

In males, the half-life of Viagra is 4 hours. This means that about 4 hours after Viagra is taken, half of the dose has been cleared from their body. But this doesn’t indicate how long Viagra may last in females.

To learn more about this, talk with your doctor.

You may have questions related to how Viagra works and how long it lasts in your body. These questions and others are answered below.

How does Viagra work?

Viagra is used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). It decreases ED symptoms by helping you get and keep an erection.

Erections happen when a protein called cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is released, causing more blood to flow into your penis.

Then, another protein called phosphodiesterase-type 5 (PDE-5) breaks down cGMP, stopping the erection. In people having trouble with erections, PDE-5 may work too quickly.

Viagra works by blocking the PDE-5 from working. This way, blood flow to the penis can occur and not be stopped by PDE-5.

If you have more questions about how Viagra works, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

How long does Viagra take to work?

Viagra works quickly after you take a dose. In most males,* Viagra works within 1 hour after it’s taken.

It’s possible that Viagra can begin working within 30 minutes of being taken. But other times, it may take up to 4 hours to start working.

If you have questions about how quickly Viagra will work for you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

What should you do if Viagra doesn’t seem to work?

If Viagra doesn’t seem to work for you, talk with your doctor. They may recommend that you take a higher dose of the drug. Then, they would monitor you to see if the higher dose is working.

In other cases, your doctor may recommend a different medication altogether.

Let your doctor know if you have concerns about Viagra not working.

Can you make Viagra work faster?

In most cases, Viagra works within 1 hour after you take a dose. But if you take your dose on an empty stomach, the drug may work faster. Taking Viagra with a meal that’s high in fat may make the drug work more slowly.

If you’d like to know more about this, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

How long does Viagra last?

Viagra works at its best within a few hours after it’s taken.

In most people, the drug is most effective about 1 hour after it’s taken. Over time, Viagra is slowly removed from the body. So over the next few hours after it’s taken, the drug may not work as well.

Talk with your doctor to learn more about how long you can expect Viagra to work.

How long does Viagra stay in your system? What’s its half-life?

The half-life of Viagra is about 4 hours. This means that 4 hours after you take a dose, your body has cleared half of the dose.

In most cases, it takes about 5 half-lives for your body to completely remove a drug from your system. So this means it may take about 20 hours for Viagra to be completely cleared from your body. But as your body clears the drug, it may not be working any longer.

Like most drugs, Viagra may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Viagra may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Viagra. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Viagra can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Viagra’s patient information.

Mild side effects of Viagra that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Viagra can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Viagra, call your doctor right away. However, if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Viagra that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Viagra may cause.

Low blood pressure

You may have low blood pressure when you’re taking Viagra. This is because of the way the drug works. It widens your blood vessels to allow more blood to flow into your penis. And this decreases your body’s blood pressure.

In most cases, Viagra will slightly decrease your blood pressure. This doesn’t usually have an effect on how you feel. But rarely, Viagra can cause your blood pressure to become too low.

Symptoms of low blood pressure may include:

  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • blurry vision
  • fatigue (low energy)

What might help

Before you start taking Viagra, you should be aware of the symptoms of low blood pressure. If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor. They’ll be able to determine how low your blood pressure is and whether it’s at a safe level.

In some cases, your doctor may monitor you more than usual, or they may recommend a different medication for you.

If your blood pressure is too low, your doctor can give you medications or fluids to help increase your blood pressure.

It’s also important to tell your doctor what other medications you’re taking before you start Viagra. Taking Viagra with other medications that also lower your blood pressure may increase your risk for this side effect. If needed, your doctor may monitor you more often than usual or recommend a different medication for you.

Headache

You may have a headache after taking Viagra. Headaches were one of the most common side effects in studies of the drug.

This side effect occurs because of the way Viagra works. It relaxes your blood vessels and increases blood flow throughout your body. And this can lead to headache in some cases.

What might help

If you’re having headaches with Viagra, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol). They may also be able to recommend other ways to decrease your headaches.

If a headache becomes severe or bothersome to you, tell your doctor.

Side effects in older people

Older people taking Viagra may have higher levels of the drug in their body than younger people do. This is because with age, the body can’t clear the drug as quickly as usual. This means that older people can have more Viagra in their body, and they may have more side effects than usual.

In studies, Viagra was just as safe and effective in older males* as it was in younger males. But older people may have an increased risk of side effects from it.

* In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

What might help

If you’re older, your doctor may recommend that you start with a low dose of Viagra. This may help lower your risk for side effects.

Talk with your doctor about the best dose of Viagra for you based on your age.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Viagra.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Viagra. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Viagra. They will also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking Viagra

Viagra comes as tablets that you take by mouth, when needed.

Available strengths: 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg

Viagra comes in these strengths: 25 milligram (mg), 50 mg, and 100 mg.

Other forms of sildenafil (the active drug in Viagra) comes in other strengths, such as 20 mg. But Viagra only comes in the three strengths listed above.

When to take Viagra

Viagra should only be taken when needed, about 1 hour before you have sex. It does not need to be taken regularly each day.

Talk with your doctor about how long before sex you should take Viagra. It’s possible that Viagra can begin working within 30 minutes after it’s taken. But sometimes, it may take up to 4 hours for the drug to work.

In any case, you should not take Viagra more than once daily.

Dosage

The normal dose when starting Viagra is 50 mg, as needed.

The maximum dose of Viagra is 100 mg each day. Doses above the maximum dose, such as 200 mg per day, will increase the risk of side effects. And in some cases, this could be serious.

Your doctor won’t recommend your Viagra dosage by weight. But they may recommend a lower dose of the drug if you’re older than 65 years. This is because you may have an increased risk of side effects given your age. So, for example, the dosage for someone 70 years old may be 25 mg as needed, instead of 50 mg as needed.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Viagra that’s best for you.

Questions about taking Viagra

Here’s a list of answers to common questions about taking Viagra.

  • What if I miss a dose of Viagra? You’ll take Viagra only as needed, about 1 hour before you have sex. So you do not need to take this medication on a daily schedule. If you forgot to take a dose before having sex, take it as soon as you remember.
  • Will I need to use Viagra long term? If Viagra works for you, your doctor will likely recommend that you use it long term, as needed for your symptoms.
  • How often can I take Viagra? Can I take it every day? Viagra should only be taken as needed before sexual activity. You can take it every day, if needed. But you should not take Viagra more than once each day. Talk with your doctor about how often you can take this drug. If you have certain health conditions, your doctor may recommend that you take Viagra less often.
  • Can Viagra be chewed, crushed, or split? It’s not known whether it’s safe to chew, crush, or split Viagra tablets. If you have trouble swallowing Viagra tablets, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Should I take Viagra with food? You can take Viagra with or without food. But taking this medication on an empty stomach may help it work more quickly. Taking it with a meal that’s high in fat may make it work more slowly.
  • How long does Viagra take to work? In most people, Viagra works within 1 hour after it’s taken. But in some people, it can begin working as soon as 30 minutes after it’s taken. In other people, it may take up to 4 hours to work.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Viagra and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will Viagra affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

In addition to Viagra, many other medications can be used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED).

Talk with your doctor about the best treatment option for you. Read on to learn about Viagra versus Cialis and other alternative drugs.

Viagra vs. Cialis

Both Viagra and Cialis are used to treat ED. In addition, Cialis is also used to treat a prostate condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). (With BPH, your prostate is enlarged.) It’s also used to treat ED that happens along with BPH.

Cialis and Viagra both belong to the same group of drugs, and they work in very similar ways. Even though these drugs are similar, they do have some differences. This includes their recommended dosing and possible side effects.

To learn more about how Viagra and Cialis are alike and different, check out this side-by-side comparison. Also, talk with your doctor about which drug is right for you.

Viagra vs. sildenafil

Viagra is a brand-name medication that contains the active drug sildenafil. This active drug comes as a generic medication, too. Sildenafil and brand-name Viagra are both used to treat ED.

Sometimes, sildenafil is also used to treat a condition called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (With PAH, you have high blood pressure inside your lungs.) But Viagra is not approved to treat this condition.

Based on why you’re taking this medication, you may have different side effects or need a different dosage of these drugs.

If you’d like to know about the similarities and differences of Viagra and its generic drug sildenafil, view this article. Talk with your doctor about which medication is better for your condition.

Viagra vs. Levitra

Viagra and Levitra are very similar medications. They’re both used to treat ED and they both belong to the same group of medications.

But even though these drugs are very similar, they have differences. The dosing of Viagra and Levitra, as well as their side effects, may differ.

To see a detailed breakdown of Viagra versus Levitra, view this article. Also, let your doctor know if you have questions about these two medications.

Viagra vs. over-the-counter products

Many over-the-counter (OTC) products may be advertised to help with ED. Examples of these products include:

It’s important to know that unlike Viagra, these products are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). So they haven’t been tested in clinical studies to see if they work for ED or are safe to use.

If you’re interested in knowing more about OTC products that can be used instead of Viagra, see this article.

But be sure to talk with your doctor before trying any OTC products, including those listed above.

Your doctor can recommend whether doing so is safe for you.

If you have erectile dysfunction (ED), your doctor may recommend that you take Viagra. It’s a prescription drug that’s used in adult males* with ED.

With ED, you have trouble getting or keeping an erection.

Viagra treats ED by increasing the amount of blood flow to your penis, helping you get or maintain an erection. But Viagra doesn’t cause erections without sexual stimulation. You must be sexually stimulated to get an erection while taking Viagra.

* In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Common questions related to using Viagra

Here are some questions related to Viagra’s use.

Does Viagra work for ED?

Yes, Viagra works to treat ED in most people. It increases blood flow to the penis to help you get or keep an erection.

If Viagra doesn’t work for you, talk with your doctor. They may recommend a higher dose of Viagra or a different medication.

Does Viagra increase your sex drive?

No, Viagra will not increase your sex drive. You’ll need to be sexually stimulated for Viagra to work. This drug just increases blood flow to your penis to help you get or maintain an erection.

Does Viagra stop you from ejaculating? Or does it make you ejaculate more than usual?

It’s possible that Viagra may affect ejaculation or cause problems with ejaculation. These may include:

  • stopping you from ejaculating
  • making you ejaculate more than usual

But abnormal ejaculation wasn’t a common side effect in people taking Viagra during studies.

If you notice changes with ejaculation while you’re taking Viagra, tell your doctor. They’ll be able to help you find out what’s causing these changes.

Does Viagra make an erection last longer than usual?

Yes, Viagra can make your erection last longer than usual. This drug works by helping you get and maintain an erection, meaning your erection can last longer than it did without Viagra.

Does Viagra help you keep an erection after ejaculating?

Yes, Viagra may help you keep an erection, even after you ejaculate.

But if you have an erection that lasts longer than 4 hours, see a doctor right away. This could be a medical emergency, and it can cause damage to your penis.

Does Viagra make your penis bigger than usual?

No, it’s unlikely that Viagra will make your penis bigger than usual when you aren’t sexually stimulated. This wasn’t a common side effect reported in people taking Viagra during studies.

When you’re sexually stimulated, Viagra can make your erect penis larger than usual. This is because the drug increases the amount of blood flow to your penis, increasing its size.

But a rare side effect of Viagra is swelling of your genitals, including your penis. This may make your penis look bigger, even when you’re not sexually stimulated. Tell your doctor if you have swelling of your penis with Viagra.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Viagra.

Is Viagra safe to take?

Yes, Viagra is safe for most people to take. But be sure to talk with your doctor before starting this drug.

If you have certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, Viagra may not be a safe option for you. This could also be the case if you’re taking certain other medications.

Before taking Viagra, tell your doctor about any other conditions you have or medications you take. They can recommend if Viagra is safe for you.

Does Viagra interact with steroids, blood thinners, or antidepressants?

In most cases, it’s probably safe to take Viagra with steroids, blood thinners, or antidepressants.

In fact, sometimes these drugs may cause symptoms of erectile dysfunction (ED), which Viagra is used to treat. So in that case, taking Viagra may help relieve your ED symptoms.

Before you start Viagra or any other medications, tell your doctor about any other drugs you take. Your doctor can tell you if there are any interactions that may happen.

How should I store Viagra? Does it expire? And what’s its shelf-life?

You should store Viagra at a temperature of 77°F (25°C). If needed, you can store this medication between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C) for a short period of time.

Your pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label of your bottle of Viagra when it’s dispensed at your pharmacy. In many cases, medications are OK to use for 1 year after they’re dispensed from a pharmacy. Be sure to take the medication before its expiration date and throw it away after it expires.

If you have any questions about how to store medications or how long they’re good for, talk with your pharmacist.

Can I take Viagra and Adderall together?

There aren’t any known interactions between Viagra and Adderall XR. But that doesn’t mean that no interaction exists.

Viagra works by widening your blood vessels, which decreases your blood pressure. Adderall, on the other hand, is a stimulant and may increase your blood pressure.

Both medications may have effects on your heart. So even though an interaction hasn’t been reported, it’s possible that taking these two drugs may affect your heart.

Be sure to talk with your doctor about all the medications you’re taking before starting Viagra. They’ll be able to help you determine if there are any interactions you should know about.

Is Revatio an alternative to Viagra?

No, Revatio isn’t an alternative to Viagra. Revatio and Viagra both contain the active drug sildenafil. But they’re prescribed for different reasons.

Viagra is used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). This is unlike Revatio, which is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. (This is a condition that causes high blood pressure in your lungs.)

Although these medications contain the same active drug, their uses and dosages are different. Also, Revatio comes as tablets and a suspension you can take by mouth, as well as an injectable form. Viagra only comes as tablets you take by mouth.

Your doctor will recommend which medication you should take. And they’ll prescribe the dose that’s best for you.

Are there risks to taking Viagra with illegal drugs, such as cocaine?

Yes, there are likely risks to taking Viagra with illegal drugs, including cocaine.

In fact, taking Viagra along with an illegal drug called “poppers” can be deadly. “Poppers” contain nitrates. Using nitrates with Viagra may cause your blood pressure to become dangerously low.

There aren’t any studies to show if it’s safe to take Viagra with illegal drugs, such as cocaine. So it’s not known what risks may come with taking these drugs together.

But cocaine is a stimulant, so it may increase your blood pressure and heart rate. Viagra works in the opposite way. It decreases your blood pressure and widens your blood vessels. Because both drugs affect the heart, taking them together may cause interactions and side effects.

Because the combination of Viagra and cocaine, or other illegal drugs, hasn’t been studied, the risks aren’t known for sure.

If you want to know more about this, talk with your doctor.

Does Viagra treat premature ejaculation?

At this time, Viagra isn’t approved to treat premature ejaculation. With premature ejaculation, ejaculation happens too quickly.

Viagra has been studied in males* with premature ejaculation. But the studies have had mixed results on whether the drug was effective or not.

More information is needed to know if Viagra is safe or effective to treat premature ejaculation. If you’d like, talk with your doctor about the best treatment option for this condition.

* In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Some important things to discuss with your doctor when you’re considering Viagra include:

  • your overall health
  • any medical conditions you have
  • any other medications you take

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Viagra, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you take. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Viagra.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Viagra can interact with several types of drugs. These drugs include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Viagra. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of Viagra.

Warnings

Viagra may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Viagra. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Heart problems, stroke, or heart surgery within the past 6 months. If you’ve had heart conditions, such as a heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, or you’ve had recent heart surgery, talk with your doctor. They can tell you if your heart is healthy enough for sex and Viagra use. Your doctor may monitor you for side effects more often than usual. Or they may recommend that you avoid taking Viagra if sex puts too much stress on your heart. Be sure to tell your doctor about any history of heart problems you have.
  • Abnormality in penis shape. If you have any conditions that cause an abnormal penis shape, such as Peyronie’s disease, tell your doctor before taking Viagra. You may have an increased risk for priapism or damage to your penis if your erection lasts too long with Viagra. (With priapism, you have an erection that lasts longer than 4 hours and may be painful.) Talk with your doctor about the medication that’s right for you.
  • Blood cell problems, such as sickle cell anemia. If you have certain blood cell problems, you may have an increased risk of priapism. And this can cause damage to your penis. Be sure to tell your doctor about any blood cell problems you have, including sickle cell anemia.
  • Eye conditions, such as non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) or hereditary retinitis pigmentosa. Rarely, Viagra can cause loss of vision in one or both eyes. If you have certain eye conditions, you may have an increased risk of new eye problems or worsening of your vision. Your doctor may monitor your vision while you’re taking this drug.
  • Low blood pressure. If you have low blood pressure, tell your doctor before starting Viagra. Viagra may decrease your blood pressure. If you already have low blood pressure, taking Viagra may decrease your blood pressure to an unsafe level. Your doctor may recommend more blood pressure monitoring than usual while you’re taking Viagra.
  • Bleeding disorders. It’s possible that Viagra may increase your risk for bleeding. If you have a bleeding disorder, taking Viagra may make your condition worse. Be sure to tell your doctor about any bleeding disorders that you have.
  • Stomach ulcers. If you have a stomach ulcer, taking Viagra may increase your risk of bleeding in your stomach. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have a stomach ulcer before taking this drug.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Viagra or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Viagra. This is a contraindication to using this medication. (A contraindication is a reason that might prevent your doctor from prescribing a drug.) Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Kidney or liver problems. If you have kidney or liver problems, your body may not be able to clear Viagra like usual. This may cause the drug to build up in your body, increasing your risk for side effects. Tell your doctor about any kidney or liver conditions that you have before taking this drug.

Viagra and alcohol

It’s possible that drinking alcohol while you’re taking Viagra may cause low blood pressure. Both Viagra and alcohol can cause your blood pressure to decrease. So this combination may cause your blood pressure to drop too low, which can be unsafe.

If you’d like to drink alcohol while you’re taking Viagra, talk with your doctor. They’ll be able to determine how much alcohol, if any, is safe for you to drink.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Viagra isn’t approved for use in females.* It’s not known whether it’s safe to take it during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. This is because Viagra hasn’t been studied in these situations.

* In this article, we use the term “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Viagra in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Viagra manufacturer’s website to see if they have support options.

Do not take more Viagra than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by a Viagra overdose are the same as the drug’s typical side effects. But they may be more severe than usual if caused by overdose. To see a list of possible side effects with this drug, see the “What are Viagra’s side effects?” section above.

What to do in case you take too much Viagra

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Viagra. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use its online resource. However, if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you have erectile dysfunction (ED), your doctor may recommend that you take Viagra.

Be sure to tell your doctor about any medical conditions you have and any medications you take before starting Viagra. Your doctor can determine if this drug is right for you.

Some questions that you may wish to ask your doctor include:

  • Is Viagra safe for me given my medical history?
  • What’s the best dosage of Viagra for me?
  • What should I do if Viagra doesn’t work?
  • How should I manage side effects of Viagra?

If you have additional questions about treatment options for ED, see this article. If you’re interested in a natural treatment for ED, see this article.

If you wish to stay up to date with men’s health topics, including treatments for ED, sign up for Healthline’s men’s health newsletter.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.