Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) is a prescription drug that’s used to manage certain inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and plaque psoriasis. Amjevita comes as a liquid solution that’s injected under the skin.

Amjevita is used in adults to treat the following conditions in certain situations:

Amjevita is also used in some children to treat the following conditions in certain situations:

To learn more about Amjevita’s uses, see the “What is Amjevita used for?” section below.

Amjevita basics

Amjevita contains the active ingredient adalimumab-atto,* which is a biologic medication. A biologic is made from parts of living organisms. Amjevita is the biosimilar form of another drug called Humira. (Biosimilars are like generic drugs. But unlike generics, which are made for nonbiologic drugs, biosimilars are made for biologic drugs.)

* The reason “-atto” appears at the end of the drug’s name is to show that the drug is distinct from similar medications.

Amjevita and Humira are both biologic drugs, and Amjevita is a biosimilar form of Humira. Biosimilar medications are similar to generic drugs. But unlike generics, which are made for nonbiologic drugs, biosimilars are made for biologic drugs.

Amjevita contains the active ingredient adalimumab-atto,* and Humira contains the active ingredient adalimumab. Because Amjevita is a biosimilar form of Humira, their side effects are similar.

Both Amjevita and Humira are approved to treat the same conditions. However, Amjevita is approved for ulcerative colitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, and uveitis in adults only. Humira is also approved for certain children with these conditions.

If you have other questions about how Amjevita and Humira compare, talk with your doctor. They can help you find the best treatment plan for you.

* The reason “-atto” appears at the end of the drug’s name is to show that the drug is distinct from similar medications.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Amjevita.

Can Amjevita cause long-term side effects?

Yes, Amjevita may cause long-term side effects. For example, this drug may increase your risk of lymphoma, leukemia, or skin cancer. In fact, Amjevita has a boxed warning about the increased risk of cancer. To learn more, see the “What should be considered before Amjevita treatment?” section below.

Other long-term side effects of Amjevita include:

If you have concerns about long-term side effects with Amjevita, talk with your doctor. They can discuss what you may expect from Amjevita treatment.

Will Amjevita cure rheumatoid arthritis?

No, Amjevita does not cure rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In fact, there’s currently no cure for this condition. Instead, Amjevita works to manage the symptoms of RA.

If you have other questions about what to expect from your Amjevita treatment, talk with your doctor.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use.

You can visit Optum Perks* to get price estimates of what you’d pay for Amjevita when using coupons from the site. See the coupon options below. (Note: Optum Perks coupons cannot be used with any insurance copays or benefits.)

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You could also be eligible for the manufacturer’s SupportPlus Co-pay program, which may help lower the drug’s cost.

You can check out this article to learn more about saving money on prescriptions.

* Optum Perks is a sister site of Healthline.

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Like most drugs, Amjevita may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Amjevita may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you take

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Amjevita. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a list of some of the mild side effects that Amjevita can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Amjevita’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of Amjevita that have been reported include:

  • infections, such as a respiratory infection
  • injection site reactions, such as pain, swelling, or itching
  • rash
  • headache
  • mild allergic reaction*

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Allergic reaction” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Amjevita can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Amjevita, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Amjevita that have been reported include:

* For more information, see the “What should be considered before Amjevita treatment?” section.
† To learn more about this side effect, see the “Allergic reaction” section below.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Amjevita.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, usually in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Amjevita. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Amjevita that’s right for you. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Forms and strengths

Amjevita is available as a solution that’s given as an injection under your skin. It comes in a SureClick autoinjector. The autoinjector is available in the following strengths, given in milligrams per milliliter of solution (mg/mL):

  • 80 mg/0.8 mL
  • 40 mg/0.8 mL
  • 40 mg/0.4 mL

Amjevita is also available in a prefilled glass syringe. The syringes are available in the following strengths:

  • 80 mg/0.8 mL
  • 40 mg/0.8 mL
  • 40 mg/0.4 mL
  • 20 mg/0.4 mL
  • 20 mg/0.2 mL
  • 10 mg/0.2 mL

Recommended dosages

When Amjevita is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, a dose is given once every other week.

When Amjevita is used to treat plaque psoriasis or uveitis, a dose is given on day 1 of treatment and then on day 8. After that, you’ll receive a dose every other week.

When Amjevita is used to treat Crohn’s disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, or ulcerative colitis, a dose is given on day 1 of treatment,* then on days 15 and 29. After that, you’ll receive a dose every other week.

In some cases, your doctor may recommend increasing your dose to once weekly, based on your condition and how the medication is working for you.

To learn more about Amjevita’s dosage, see this article.

* For treating these conditions in adults, doctors may split the first dose of Amjevita over day 1 and day 2 of treatment.

Questions about Amjevita’s dosing

Below are some common questions about Amjevita’s dosing.

  • What if I miss a dose of Amjevita? If you miss a dose of Amjevita and you give yourself injections at home, take your dose as soon as you remember. Then, take your next dose at its usual time. If you have questions about when to take Amjevita after you’ve missed a dose, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. If you miss an appointment to receive a dose of Amjevita, call your doctor’s office as soon as possible to reschedule.
  • Will I need to use Amjevita long term? In most cases, Amjevita is prescribed as a long-term treatment. But if the medication isn’t working for you, your doctor may have you stop Amjevita treatment and switch to a different drug.
  • How long does Amjevita take to work? Amjevita begins to work as soon as you take your first dose. But it may take several weeks before you notice a decrease in your symptoms. How quickly Amjevita works to manage your symptoms may depend on many factors, including which condition you’re treating and how severe your condition is. If you have questions about what to expect from Amjevita, talk with your doctor.

Amjevita can be used to treat certain inflammatory conditions, as listed below. Note that some of these conditions are autoimmune diseases. With autoimmune diseases, the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue in the body.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Amjevita can be used in adults with moderately to severely active* RA. With this condition, your body attacks your joints and causes swelling and pain.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Amjevita can be used in children ages 2 years and older with moderately to severely active polyarticular JIA. This condition can cause stiff, swollen, or painful joints in children.

Psoriatic arthritis. Amjevita is prescribed to treat active psoriatic arthritis in adults. With this condition, you may experience swelling or pain in your joints along with the symptoms of psoriasis, such as thick scaly patches on your skin.

Ankylosing spondylitis. Amjevita is used to treat active ankylosing spondylitis in adults. This is a type of arthritis that primarily affects the spine.

Plaque psoriasis. Amjevita is used in adults with moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. This condition causes dry, scaly patches to occur on your skin.

Amjevita can be used in adults with plaque psoriasis that could benefit from phototherapy (light treatment) or systemic treatment (medication that works throughout your body).

Hidradenitis suppurativa. Amjevita is prescribed for adults with moderate to severe hidradenitis suppurativa. This condition can cause painful bumps on your skin, usually in your armpits or inner thighs.

Crohn’s disease. Amjevita can be used to treat moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease in adults and children ages 6 years and older. Crohn’s disease is a condition that usually affects the small intestine and causes symptoms such as diarrhea and bloody stool.

Ulcerative colitis. Amjevita is prescribed for adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis. This condition typically affects your large intestine or rectum. It can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, fever, and weight loss.

Note that Amjevita belongs to a group of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. It’s not known whether Amjevita is effective in people with ulcerative colitis who have previously tried other TNF blockers that stopped working or caused bothersome side effects.

Uveitis. Amjevita may be used to treat uveitis, which causes swelling in a part of the eye called the uvea. Doctors prescribe the drug to treat uveitis affecting the middle or back of the uvea or all of this part of the eye. While this condition may be caused by infection, Amjevita is used to treat uveitis that is non-infectious (caused by something other than infection).

The conditions above are all inflammatory conditions, which occur when your immune system is overactive. One cause of an overactive immune system may be too much tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Amjevita works by blocking TNF in your body. This helps reduce the symptoms of your condition.

* “Active” means the condition is causing symptoms.

Amjevita comes as a liquid solution that’s given as an injection under the skin.

Your doctor or another healthcare professional will give you your first dose of Amjevita. Then, they may teach you or a caregiver how to give injections at home. The drug manufacturer also provides step-by-step instructions on using the Amjevita SureClick autoinjector and the prefilled syringe.

Amjevita is injected into the front of your thigh or your abdomen (but not the 2-inch area around your belly button). You’ll inject the drug into a different place on your thigh or abdomen each time to help prevent injection site reactions, such as pain. You should not inject Amjevita into skin that’s tender, bruised, scarred, or discolored.

If you have questions about injecting Amjevita at home, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Accessible medication containers and labels

If it’s hard for you to read the label on your prescription, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Certain pharmacies may provide medication labels that:

  • have large print
  • use braille
  • contain a code you can scan with a smartphone to change the text into audio

Your doctor or pharmacist may be able to recommend a pharmacy that offers these options if your current pharmacy doesn’t.

Using Amjevita with other drugs

For rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis, Amjevita may be prescribed with certain disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). An example is methotrexate (Otrexup, Trexall, others).

For juvenile idiopathic arthritis, children may use Amjevita with methotrexate.

For its other uses, your doctor can tell you whether you’ll use Amjevita by itself or with other treatments.

Questions about Amjevita treatment

Below are some common questions about Amjevita treatment.

  • Should I take my Amjevita dose with food? You can take your dose of Amjevita with or without food. The drug is given as an injection under the skin and isn’t affected by food.
  • Is there a best time of day to inject Amjevita? No, there isn’t a best time of day to inject an Amjevita dose. The drug is usually only injected once per week or every other week. But it’s best to take it on the same day of the week, such as Wednesdays. This helps to keep a consistent amount of medication in your body.

Before you start treatment with Amjevita, be sure to tell your doctor about your medical history. This includes medical conditions that you have or medications that you take. This can help determine whether Amjevita may be a safe treatment option for you.

Interactions

Taking a medication with certain vaccines, foods, and other things can affect how the medication works. These effects are called interactions.

Before starting Amjevita treatment, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Amjevita.

For information about drug-condition interactions, see the “Other warnings” section below.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Amjevita can interact with several types of drugs. Examples include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Amjevita. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of Amjevita.

Boxed warnings

Amjevita has boxed warnings about the risk of serious infection and risk of cancer. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Boxed warnings for Amjevita include:

Risk of serious infection. Amjevita weakens your immune system, which can increase your risk of infection. In some cases, these infections may be serious or even life threatening.

Examples of infections Amjevita can cause include bacterial or viral infections, fungal infections that spread throughout the body, tuberculosis (TB), and sepsis.

Before starting Amjevita treatment, tell your doctor about any infections you’ve had or currently have, especially if you’ve had TB or hepatitis B. Your doctor can determine whether Amjevita is safe for you.

If you have an active* infection before starting Amjevita treatment, your doctor will likely recommend treating it before starting Amjevita.

You should also tell your doctor if you have any factors that may increase your risk of infection during your Amjevita treatment. Examples include:

  • having diabetes
  • taking other medications that may weaken your immune system, such as rituximab (Rituxan)
  • planning to have a major surgery

If you develop symptoms of an infection during your Amjevita treatment, tell your doctor right away. Symptoms of infection to watch for include:

  • fever
  • muscle aches
  • unintentional weight loss
  • cough
  • diarrhea

If you have questions or concerns about your risk of infection with Amjevita, talk with your doctor.

Risk of cancer. Amjevita weakens your immune system. This may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, including lymphoma, leukemia, or skin cancer.

The risk of cancer may be higher in people taking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers such as Amjevita for Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. In some people, especially teenage or young adult males,† a type of lymphoma called hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma can occur. You may have a higher risk of developing this type of cancer if you have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and also take other medications that weaken your immune system.

Your doctor will discuss the risks of Amjevita with you before you start treatment. They can also tell you about symptoms of cancer to watch for, including changes in your skin, fever, or swollen lymph nodes. In addition, they may order blood tests throughout your treatment to check for cancer.

If you’re concerned about your risk of cancer with Amjevita, talk with your doctor before starting treatment.

* “Active” means the infection is causing symptoms.
† In this article, we use the term “male” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Other warnings

Amjevita can sometimes cause harmful effects in people who have certain conditions. This is known as a drug-condition interaction. Other factors may also affect whether Amjevita is a good treatment option for you.

Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Amjevita. Factors to consider include those described below.

Liver problems. Before starting Amjevita treatment, tell your doctor about any liver conditions you have, such as liver failure. This medication may cause increased levels of liver enzymes. If you already have a liver condition, treatment with Amjevita could worsen it. If you have a liver problem, your doctor can determine whether Amjevita may be a safe treatment option.

Nervous system problems. If you have nervous system problems, such as multiple sclerosis and Guillain-Barré syndrome, tell your doctor before starting treatment with Amjevita. This medication can raise your risk of developing nervous system problems. And if you already have a condition affecting your nervous system, Amjevita may make your condition worse. Your doctor can determine whether Amjevita is right for you.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Amjevita or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Amjevita. Ask them what other medications are better options for you.

Hepatitis B. Before starting Amjevita treatment, tell your doctor if you’ve had hepatitis B. Using this medication may cause hepatitis B to become active (cause symptoms) again. Your doctor can recommend whether Amjevita may be a safe treatment option for you if you have hepatitis B.

Heart failure. If you have heart failure, tell your doctor before starting Amjevita treatment. Amjevita may worsen this condition. Letting your doctor know you have heart failure can help them determine whether Amjevita is right for you.

Before you start Amjevita treatment, your doctor may test your blood for hepatitis B. If you have this condition, your doctor will monitor you throughout your treatment and for a few months after you stop treatment.

Amjevita and alcohol

Amjevita is not known to interact with alcohol. But alcohol and Amjevita may cause some of the same side effects. For example, both can cause headaches or liver problems. So drinking alcohol during your Amjevita treatment may increase your risk of these side effects or make them worse.

Alcohol may also make symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions worse. Because of this, your doctor may recommend limiting how much alcohol you drink.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much may be safe to consume with your condition and treatment plan.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

It’s not known whether Amjevita treatment may be safe during pregnancy. Amjevita can cross the placenta during the third trimester of pregnancy. This means that a fetus will be exposed to the drug, which may cause a temporarily weakened immune system in a newborn.

Because of this, if you have Amjevita treatment during pregnancy, your doctor may recommend waiting longer than usual for your newborn to get their first vaccines. This may be done to ensure that the child has a strong enough immune system for the vaccines to be effective.

However, having an untreated inflammatory condition may also have effects during pregnancy. Your doctor can help determine the best treatment plan for you.

It’s not known whether Amjevita treatment is safe while breastfeeding. The drug may pass into breast milk, but the effects this may have on a child who is breastfed are unknown.

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant or to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before starting Amjevita treatment.

Do not use more Amjevita than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to adverse effects.

What to do in case you receive too much Amjevita

Call your doctor if you think you’ve received too much Amjevita. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach America’s Poison Centers or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you have questions about Amjevita treatment, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Questions you may want to ask include:

  • If Amjevita isn’t working for me, will you increase my dose?
  • If I have side effects from Amjevita, will you decrease my dose?
  • How can I manage or prevent side effects of Amjevita?
  • What should I do if I become pregnant during my treatment with Amjevita?

To get information on different conditions and tips for improving your health, subscribe to any of Healthline’s newsletters. You may also want to check out the online communities at Bezzy. It’s a place where people with certain conditions can find support and connect with others.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.