someone scooping cooked rice from a potShare on Pinterest

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Rice is a staple food for more than half of the world’s population (1).

Given the numerous types of rice, you have a lot of options to choose from. What’s more, you may want to consider the overall quality, taste, texture, nutrient content, and a lack of additives like preservatives (1, 2).

Some people may also prefer to buy organic rice, as it’s less likely to have pesticide residues. Whether conventionally grown or organic, the macronutrient profile remains similar (3, 4).

To help you determine which to choose, Healthline evaluated the best brands of rice based on the following factors:

  • overall quality
  • a lack of additives, including preservatives and artificial ingredients
  • taste and texture when cooked
  • nutritional value

When comparing nutrients, keep in mind that 1/4 cup (about 45 grams) of uncooked rice yields 1/2–1 cup cooked (about 125–250 grams), depending on the variety of rice and cooking method.

Here are the 12 best brands of rice.

When shopping for rice at the store, you should examine packages carefully. Keep an eye out for products with several broken grains of rice, as this may indicate that the product isn’t as fresh.

Moreover, opt for products that are free of additives and preservatives. In fact, unless you’re buying microwavable or preseasoned rice, the only ingredient should be rice.

If you’re concerned about pesticide residues, only choose products that are USDA certified organic.

It’s also important to consider the health benefits of brown versus white rice.

White rice is processed to only contain the starchy part of the grain called the endosperm, while brown rice also contains the germ and bran — making it a more nutritious option (6, 30).

Brown rice is often higher in fiber and important nutrients. Switching from white to brown rice has been shown to help lower blood sugar levels and reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes (31, 32, 33).

Pricing guide

General price ranges are indicated below with dollar signs ($ to $$$). One dollar sign means the product is considered more affordable, whereas three dollar signs indicate a higher cost.

Generally, prices range from $0.15–$1.44 per dry ounce (about 28 grams), or $3.49–$46.29 per package, though this may vary depending on where you shop.

Pricing guide

  • $ = under $0.50 per ounce (28 grams)
  • $$ = $0.50–$1.00 per ounce (28 grams)
  • $$$ = over $1.00 per ounce (28 grams)

Best brown rice

Lundberg Family Farms Organic Long-Grain Brown Rice

  • Price: $$$
  • Certifications: gluten-free, non-GMO, and organic

Unlike white rice, brown rice is considered a whole grain because it contains all parts of the grain — the bran, germ, and endosperm. Thus, it’s often higher in fiber, protein, and certain minerals like manganese and magnesium than white rice (5,6).

Lundberg Family Farms is a family-owned company that offers a wide variety of grains and grain products. Their organic long-grain brown rice is one of the best on the market, as it’s certified organic, certified gluten-free, and non-GMO verified.

It’s also free of any additives and contains only one ingredient — organic long-grain brown rice.

Once cooked, the rice has a firm, nonsticky texture and slightly nutty flavor that works well in a variety of dishes, including stir-fries, pilafs, and casseroles.

Just 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, provides (7):

  • Calories: 170
  • Fat: 1.5 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 34 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 3 grams

Best white rice

RiceSelect Organic Texmati White Rice

  • Price: $$$
  • Certifications: gluten-free, non-GMO, organic

Although brown rice is considered more nutritious, white rice is more widely consumed around the world (1).

RiceSelect’s Organic White Texmati is one of the best white rice options, as it’s non-GMO verified, certified gluten-free, and organic. It’s also free of additives and preservatives.

Texmati is a unique strain described as an American-style basmati rice. Though not as aromatic as traditional basmati, its nutty, almost popcorn-like flavor goes well in a variety of dishes, such as curries and casseroles.

Only 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, offers (8):

  • Calories: 150
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 34 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 3 grams

Best basmati rice

Pride of India Extra Long Brown Basmati

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: n/a

Basmati rice is known for its nutty flavor and slightly floral aroma. It’s commonly found in Indian and South Asian cuisine, including dishes such as biryani and rice pilaf.

Basmati has a needle-like shape and shouldn’t be as sticky as regular brown or white rice when cooked.

Pride of India is a family-owned company that offers a variety of grains, herbs, and spices from India.

While the company claims that all its products are grown organically and without GMOs, their extra long brown basmati rice is not non-GMO verified and hasn’t been certified organic by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Still, this product is one of the best basmati options since it’s aged for up to 2 years, resulting in a noticeable floral aroma and deeper flavor than many other basmati products.

One-fourth cup (49 grams), uncooked, provides (9):

  • Calories: 180
  • Fat: 0.8 grams
  • Sodium: 3.4 mg
  • Carbs: 38 grams
  • Fiber: 0 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams

Best jasmine rice

Lundberg Family Farms Organic California Brown Jasmine Rice

  • Price: $$
  • Certifications: organic, non-GMO, gluten-free

Like basmati, jasmine rice is a long-grain rice. However, jasmine tends to be shorter than basmati and slightly stickier when cooked. It’s also known for its strong floral aroma and buttery flavor.

Lundberg Family Farms’ organic brown jasmine rice is higher in fiber than white jasmine rice but with the same great taste and texture you would expect (10, 11).

It’s also free of additives and certified organic, non-GMO, and gluten-free.

Only 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, contains (10):

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 1.5 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 33 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Protein: 4 grams

Best wild rice

North Bay Trading Company Minnesota Grown Wild Rice

  • Price: $$
  • Certifications: Kosher

Despite being cooked and eaten like rice, wild rice is the seeds of aquatic grasses. Four species exist, three of which are found widely in the Great Lakes region of the United States (12).

Wild rice is known for its distinct dark coloring and earthy flavor. It’s considered a whole grain and is a good source of protein (12).

The North Bay Trading Company is a family-run business whose products undergo voluntary audits by the Global Food Safety Initiative. Their wild rice is harvested in Minnesota and contains wild rice as the only ingredient.

This product gets high reviews for its nutty, rich flavor and firm texture, making it a good option for soups, casseroles, and pilafs.

About 1/4 cup (48 grams), uncooked, offers (13):

  • Calories: 176
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 37 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 8 grams

Best black rice

Thrive Market Organic Black Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: organic, non-GMO, gluten-free

Black rice, also known as forbidden or purple rice, gets its signature purple-black hue from anthocyanin — a pigment with potent antioxidant properties (14, 15).

While similar to brown rice in its high fiber content and whole grain status, black rice is slightly higher in protein (16, 17).

The online subscription-based retailer Thrive Market offers one of the best forbidden rice options. In addition to being certified organic, gluten-free, and non-GMO, its black rice is free of added ingredients and contains only Italian-grown black rice.

When cooked, black rice has a pleasant, bread-like aroma, nutty flavor, and fluffy texture. As a result, it works well in both savory and sweet dishes.

Just 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, provides (18):

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 34 grams
  • Fiber: 4 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams

Best red rice

Lotus Foods Organic Red Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: organic, non-GMO

Like black rice, red rice gets its vibrant color from its anthocyanin content. It’s also considered a whole grain, making it a good source of fiber (19).

Lotus Foods is a rice company that’s committed to supporting small-scale farmers and sustainable rice growing methods. Its red rice is grown on family farms in Thailand and is both certified organic and non-GMO.

Notably, this product is rich in several important minerals.

When cooked, this long-grain rice has a nutty flavor that works well with soups, salads, pilafs, and stir-fries.

One-fourth cup (50 grams), uncooked, contains (20):

  • Calories: 170
  • Fat: 1 gram
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 38 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams

Best sprouted brown rice

Planet Rice Sprouted Brown Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: gluten-free, non-GMO, free of additives

Sprouting, also known as germination, involves the prolonged soaking of grains or seeds to make them more nutritious and easier to digest (21).

Specifically, sprouting has been shown to increase the protein content of brown rice (21).

Sprouting also makes certain minerals easier to absorb by reducing levels of phytate — a plant compound that impairs your absorption of nutrients like zinc, calcium, and iron from grains and legumes (21, 22).

Planet Rice’s sprouted brown rice is an ideal choice since it’s certified gluten-free, non-GMO verified, and free of additives.

This product is slightly softer and sweeter than regular brown rice.

Just 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, provides (23):

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 32 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Protein: 4 grams

Best rice for sushi

Shirakiku Koshihikari Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: free of additives and preservatives

“Sushi rice” refers to white short-grain Japanese rice or medium-grain California rice that becomes sticky after cooking. You may also see it labeled as Calrose rice.

Koshihikari is a popular cultivar of short-grain rice that originated in Japan but is also grown in Australia and the United States. It’s commonly used in sushi since it’s slightly sweet and has a sticky texture when cooked (24).

If you’re planning to make your own sushi rolls or poke bowls at home, Shirakiku’s Koshihikari is the best option.

Grown in California, this product gets great reviews for its stickiness and sweetness. While it isn’t non-GMO verified, it’s free of additives and preservatives.

Only 1/4 cup (45 grams), uncooked, contains (25):

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 0 mg
  • Carbs: 36 grams
  • Fiber: 0 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 2 grams

Best microwavable rice

Lunderberg Family Farms Organic Heat and Eat Bowl

  • Price: $$
  • Certifications: organic, non-GMO

Microwave-ready rice is a popular option for anyone looking for a quick and easy lunch or dinner.

However, some products are more processed than others. Choose those that are free of artificial colors, flavorings, preservatives, and added sugars.

In addition to their wide variety of stovetop rice products, Lundberg Family Farms offers a microwave-ready brown rice bowl that’s certified organic and non-GMO verified, and it only contains cooked long-grain brown rice.

You simply lift the flap on top and microwave it on high for 90 seconds.

Depending on your calorie and carb goals, one container may be enough for two meals.

One container provides 1 cup (210 grams) cooked rice and offers (26):

  • Calories: 320
  • Fat: 2.5 grams
  • Sodium: 20 mg
  • Carbs: 70 grams
  • Fiber: 4 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Protein: 5 grams

Tasty Bite Organic Brown Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: organic, non-GMO

Tasty Bite’s organic brown rice is a fully cooked, microwavable option that’s widely available and reasonably priced.

Each microwavable package makes enough for 2 servings and takes just 90 seconds to cook.

What’s more, it’s certified organic and non-GMO verified. While it contains sunflower oil, it’s free of preservatives and artificial flavors and colors. It’s also a good source of fiber and protein.

A single container, at 1 cup (140 grams) provides (27):

  • Calories: 230
  • Fat: 3 grams
  • Sodium: 5 mg
  • Carbs: 44 grams
  • Fiber: 4 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams

Best preseasoned rice

Seeds of Change Organic Quinoa and Brown Rice

  • Price: $
  • Certifications: organic

While tasty and convenient, boxed rice — also called preseasoned rice — is often packed with added ingredients like flavorings, colors, and preservatives.

These products may also be high in sodium, with some brands providing nearly half of your daily sodium allowance in just one serving (28).

Seeds of Change is an organic food company that specializes in preseasoned whole grain mixes.

Their quinoa and brown rice product uses just a handful of ingredients, including sunflower oil, sea salt, dried garlic, tapioca starch, onion powder, soy lecithin, parsley, and black pepper. While it’s not a low sodium option, it’s lower in salt than many competitors.

Notably, the addition of quinoa boosts its protein and nutrient content.

As it’s already seasoned, it makes for an easy side dish that you can cook on the stovetop or in the microwave.

One cooked serving — about 1 cup (142 grams) — provides (29):

  • Calories: 240
  • Fat: 3.5 grams
  • Sodium: 400 mg
  • Carbs: 47 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Protein: 6 grams

What kind of rice is best to eat daily?

There’s no one, specific “super” rice that beats all others in terms of benefits. However, whole grains are more nutritionally dense than white rice.

As stated previously, they are associated with lowering risk in developing heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, prepackaged rice may not be the best option if you’re looking to avoid additives and sodium.

What kind of rice is the most fragrant?

Both Jasmine and Basmati rice are known to be aromatic strains of rice, which means you might notice a subtle fragrance when cooking them (34).

You can elevate the natural flavors of these strains by toasting the grains in fat prior to cooking.

Should I rinse rice before cooking it?

Depending on the type of rice and the recipe you’re making, you may need to wash rice prior to cooking.

In terms of cleanliness, modern rice does not necessarily need to be washed as it will be boiled or cooked sufficiently.

Rinsing rice can help wash away some of the excess starch found on the outside of the grains, which can help reduce its “sticky” texture. However, some recipes call for soaking rice, such as in recipes for stick rice, to help hydrate the grains.

Rice is a versatile grain that’s enjoyed globally. Still, the multitude of varieties and options can be overwhelming.

When buying rice, choose brands like the ones above that are considered high in quality and contain no additives, preservatives, or unnecessary ingredients.

Finally, you should always opt for the product with the best flavor and texture for your recipe.