If you have depression, your doctor may recommend that you take Trintellix. Trintellix can be used to treat a condition called major depressive disorder in adults.

Trintellix basics

Trintellix contains the active drug ingredient vortioxetine. It’s available as a tablet that you take by mouth. It belongs to a group of medications called antidepressants.

Trintellix generic

At this time, Trintellix is only available as a brand-name drug. It isn’t available as a generic medication.

Read on to learn about Trintellix’s side effects, dosage, and more.

Like most drugs, Trintellix may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Trintellix may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you take

For more information about Trintellix’s side effects, see this article. Your doctor or pharmacist can also tell you more about the potential side effects of Trintellix. And they can suggest ways to help relieve side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Trintellix can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Trintellix’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of Trintellix that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Trintellix can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Trintellix, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Trintellix that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Trintellix may cause.

Boxed warning

Trintellix has a boxed warning. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Although rare, it’s possible for antidepressants such as Trintellix to cause suicidal thoughts or behaviors in people who are ages 18 to 24 years. (Trintellix is not recommended for use in children at this time.)

What might help

Before you start taking Trintellix, tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts or behaviors. They may monitor you more often for mood changes, especially when you start taking Trintellix or your dosage changes.

While you’re taking Trintellix, your family or friends should also watch for changes in your mood or suicidal thoughts or behaviors. They should let you and your doctor know of any changes they notice as soon as possible.

If you do have suicidal thoughts or behaviors during Trintellix treatment, tell your doctor right away. They may recommend changing your medication.

SUICIDE PREVENTION

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Sexual side effects

Sexual side effects often occur from taking antidepressants such as Trintellix, and they can affect both males and females.*

Examples of sexual side effects that Trintellix may cause include:

* In this article, we use the terms “male” and “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

What might help

If you develop any sexual side effects from taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend treatment options to decrease your sexual side effects.

Nausea and vomiting

You may experience nausea and vomiting while taking Trintellix. In studies, these two side effects commonly occurred in people taking the drug.

What might help

Some side effects may lessen as you continue taking Trintellix. For example, in studies of this drug, nausea usually lasted for about 2 weeks. But in some people, this side effect lasted longer.

If you’re experiencing nausea or vomiting from taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend ways to relieve these side effects. Your doctor may even recommend that you take another medication to avoid these side effects.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Trintellix.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Trintellix. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Trintellix.

Are any reviews available from people who’ve taken Trintellix?

While the manufacturer doesn’t have reviews on its website, it does feature first-person testimonials. Learning about the experiences of others who’ve taken Trintellix may help you decide whether the drug is right for you.

Do note that every person’s body responds differently to medications. You can’t reliably predict how your body will react to a treatment based on someone else’s experience.

Is Trintellix used for anxiety, ADHD, OCD, or bipolar disorder?

No, it isn’t. At this time, Trintellix is only used to treat major depressive disorder. It’s not used to treat anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or bipolar disorder. It’s not known whether the drug is a safe or effective treatment option for these conditions.

But your doctor could recommend taking the drug off-label for any of these conditions except for bipolar disorder. This means using the medication for a purpose other than what it’s approved for by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Studies suggest that Trintellix may be effective for treating anxiety or ADHD, though more research is needed. You should take Trintellix for these conditions only if your doctor prescribes it.

If you’re interested in taking Trintellix off-label, talk with your doctor.

Does Trintellix cause weight gain, sleepiness, headache, insomnia, or hair loss?

No, you shouldn’t have these side effects from taking Trintellix.

In studies of people taking Trintellix, no major changes in weight were reported. But other antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, may cause weight gain.

Sleepiness, headache, and insomnia (trouble sleeping or falling asleep) also aren’t side effects of Trintellix. But you may develop these side effects if you suddenly stop taking Trintellix. (This is referred to as discontinuation syndrome.) So it’s recommended that you do not stop taking Trintellix without first talking with your doctor.

If you need to stop taking Trintellix, your doctor will likely recommend that you slowly stop taking the drug over time. This will allow your body to adjust, so you’re less likely to have these side effects.

Although Trintellix doesn’t cause hair loss, it can be a side effect of other antidepressants, such as fluoxetine (Prozac).

If you’re experiencing weight gain, sleepiness, headache, insomnia, or hair loss during your treatment with Trintellix, talk with your doctor. They may be able to determine what’s causing these symptoms and suggest the right treatment options to address them.

Is Trintellix an SSRI?

No, Trintellix isn’t a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). SSRIs work by increasing serotonin levels in your brain. Although Trintellix is an antidepressant and does affect serotonin levels, it’s not considered an SSRI. It isn’t completely understood exactly how Trintellix works to treat depression.

Will I have withdrawal symptoms from stopping Trintellix treatment?

It’s possible that you may have withdrawal symptoms, also called discontinuation syndrome, if you suddenly stop taking Trintellix. This was reported in people who were taking 15 milligrams (mg) to 20 mg of Trintellix daily. Symptoms may include:

It’s possible to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking Trintellix by slowly reducing your dose of medication. If you need to stop taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor about the best way to do so.

Is Trintellix a controlled substance?

No, Trintellix isn’t a controlled substance. Controlled substances are medications that are regulated by the federal government.

In most cases, controlled substances can be misused and may even cause dependence. Misuse is taking a medication in a different way than how it was prescribed. Dependence is when you need to take a medication to function as usual.

Most medications used to treat depression aren’t controlled substances.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Trintellix that’s right for you. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Forms and strengths

Trintellix is available as a tablet that you take by mouth. It comes in strengths of 5 milligrams (mg), 10 mg, and 20 mg.

Recommended dosages

Your doctor will determine the best dose of Trintellix for you to take. You’ll take this medication by mouth once daily.

Your doctor may start you on a dose and then increase or decrease your dose based on how well the drug is working for you. Your doctor can also tell you about the maximum dosage recommended for Trintellix.

Questions about Trintellix’s dosage

Here are answers to a few questions about Trintellix’s dosage.

  • What if I miss a dose of Trintellix? If you miss your dose of Trintellix, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about the best time to take your next dose. In some cases, they may recommend taking your dose as soon as you remember. Or they may recommend skipping your missed dose and taking your next dose as scheduled.
  • Will I need to use Trintellix long term? If Trintellix is working to treat your depression, your doctor will likely recommend that you take it long term.
  • How long does Trintellix take to work? Trintellix begins working after you take your first dose of medication. But it can take up to 2 weeks for Trintellix to reach a steady level in your body. So you may not see the maximum benefit of taking Trintellix for 2 weeks.

For more details on Trintellix’s dosage, see this article.

If you’d like to learn about alternatives to Trintellix, such as sertraline (Zoloft), check out this article. It has detailed comparisons of Trintellix versus Zoloft and these drugs:

Also, be sure to talk with your doctor about which drug is recommended for your condition.

Trintellix is used to treat adults with major depressive disorder.

A person with major depressive disorder feels sad or depressed for a prolonged period of time. You may also hear this disorder referred to as depression. Symptoms may include:

It’s thought that people with depression may have a lower amount of a chemical called serotonin in their brain. Though it’s not known exactly how Trintellix works to treat depression, it’s believed to increase serotonin and its activity in your brain.

Prescription drug costs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. And you may want to visit the Trintellix manufacturer’s website to see if it has support options.

You can also check out this article to learn more about saving money on prescriptions.

Before you start taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor about any other medications you take and other medical conditions you may have. This will help them determine if Trintellix may be a safe treatment option for you.

Interactions

Taking a medication with certain vaccines, foods, and other things can affect how the medication works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Trintellix, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also, describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Trintellix.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Trintellix can interact with several types of drugs. These drugs include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Trintellix. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with Trintellix.

Other interactions

Trintellix may also interact with the herbal supplement St. John’s wort. This supplement can also increase serotonin levels, which in turn may increase your risk of serotonin syndrome, a serious side effect.

Boxed warning

Trintellix has a boxed warning. This is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. It’s possible for antidepressants such as Trintellix to cause suicidal thoughts or behaviors in people who are ages 18 to 24 years.

For more information, see the “What are Trintellix’s side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

Trintellix may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Trintellix. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Bipolar disorder. Trintellix may cause changes in mood, including mania or hypomania. People with bipolar disorder may have an increased risk of mania or hypomania. If you have this mental health condition, your doctor may monitor you more often for mood changes while you’re taking Trintellix.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Trintellix or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Trintellix. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Glaucoma or other eye conditions. Trintellix can cause an eye condition called closed-angle glaucoma. If you already have glaucoma or another eye condition, you may have an increased risk of developing closed-angle glaucoma. Your doctor may recommend treating your eye problem before starting Trintellix. They may also recommend monitoring your eyes throughout treatment with Trintellix.
  • Low sodium levels in the blood or a condition called syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Trintellix can cause low sodium levels in the blood, which may become serious if left untreated. If you have low sodium levels or a condition that causes this, such as SIADH, taking Trintellix can further decrease your sodium levels. In this case, your doctor may monitor your sodium levels throughout treatment. And if you develop low sodium levels, they might recommend a different treatment option for you.
  • Bleeding problems. Trintellix may increase the risk of bleeding. If you have a bleeding problem, your risk could increase more when taking Trintellix. The same goes if you take the drug with certain medications that also increase bleeding risk, such as aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Before you start taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor about your risk of bleeding. They may monitor you more often or recommend a different treatment option for you.

Trintellix and alcohol

If you drink alcohol while taking Trintellix, you may have an increased risk of certain side effects. For example, both alcohol and Trintellix can cause dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and bleeding.

If you want to drink alcohol during Trintellix treatment, talk with your doctor about how much alcohol, if any, is safe for you to consume.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Learn about whether Trintellix is safe to take during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

Pregnancy

It’s not known if Trintellix may be safe to take during pregnancy. Taking drugs that affect serotonin levels, such as Trintellix, in late pregnancy may increase the risk of complications in the newborn baby. This may include the baby needing breathing support, tube feedings, or hospitalization for longer than usual.

Note that females* who stopped taking antidepressants during pregnancy were more likely to have symptoms of depression. If you’re pregnant, it’s important to talk with your doctor about the benefits and drawbacks of taking Trintellix during this time.

There is a pregnancy registry for antidepressants such as Trintellix. The registry collects information about pregnant females who took antidepressants and effects the drugs may have had on their babies. This can help determine if there are risks from taking a medication during pregnancy. You can sign up for the pregnancy registry by calling 866-961-2388 or visiting its website.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor to see if Trintellix may be a safe treatment option for you.

* In this article, we use the term “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Breastfeeding

It’s not known if Trintellix can pass into breast milk or what effects the drug may have on a breastfeeding child. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before starting Trintellix. They can discuss with you the risks and benefits of breastfeeding during Trintellix treatment.

Don’t take more Trintellix than your doctor prescribes. Taking more than this can lead to serious side effects.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an overdose can include:

  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • diarrhea
  • stomach problems or discomfort
  • itching
  • sleepiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

What to do in case you take too much Trintellix

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Trintellix. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use its online resource. However, if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Trintellix. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions.

Taking Trintellix

You should take your dose of Trintellix once daily as directed by your doctor. You can take the drug in the morning or at night, but try to take it at about the same time each day.

Questions about taking Trintellix

Below are answers to a couple of questions about taking Trintellix.

  • Can Trintellix be chewed, crushed, or split? The manufacturer of Trintellix doesn’t make any recommendations on whether the drug can be chewed, crushed, or split. If you’re having difficulty swallowing your Trintellix tablet, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Or get tips on how to swallow pills from this article.
  • Should I take Trintellix with food? You can take your dose of Trintellix with or without food.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Trintellix and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will Trintellix affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Before you start taking Trintellix, talk with your doctor if you have questions about this drug. They can discuss with you its possible side effects, dosage, and more. This will help you and your doctor decide if this drug is the right treatment option for your depression. Here are a few questions to help get you started:

  • Can my dose be reduced if I have side effects from this medication?
  • What should I do if I become pregnant while taking Trintellix?
  • How should I treat side effects that I have from Trintellix?
  • Will my other health conditions or medications increase my risk of side effects from Trintellix?

To learn more about possible treatment options for depression, see this article.

For more information about Trintellix’s side effects or dosage, check out these articles:

And consider signing up for Healthline’s online newsletter to get advice for managing depression and stories from others living with this condition.

Q:

Can I take other antidepressants together with Trintellix?

Anonymous

A:

It’s possible that your doctor may prescribe other antidepressants with Trintellix. But studies haven’t looked at whether this is safe or effective.

It’s likely that taking Trintellix with other antidepressants will increase your risk of side effects.

For example, Trintellix can cause serotonin syndrome (high levels of the chemical serotonin). Your risk of this side effect can increase if you take Trintellix with other antidepressants containing serotonin, such as escitalopram (Lexapro), duloxetine (Cymbalta), or amitriptyline.

Symptoms of serotonin syndrome can include tremor, increased heart rate, and sweating. If you begin to have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor immediately.

If you’re interested in taking other antidepressants along with Trintellix, talk with your doctor. Also let them know if you feel that Trintellix isn’t working to treat your depression.

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.