If you’re looking at treatment options for bipolar I disorder or schizophrenia, your doctor might tell you about Latuda (lurasidone).

Latuda is a prescription medication that’s used to treat:

Latuda comes as a tablet that’s taken by mouth. It’s used as a long-term treatment. For more information about Latuda, including details on its uses, see this in-depth article on the drug.

Like other drugs, Latuda can cause mild or serious side effects. Keep reading to learn more.

Some people may experience mild or serious side effects during their Latuda treatment. Examples of Latuda’s commonly reported side effects include:

Keep reading to learn about other possible mild and serious side effects of Latuda.

* To learn more about this side effect, see “Side effects explained” below.

Some people may have mild side effects while taking Latuda. Examples of mild side effects that have been reported with Latuda include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see “Side effects explained” below.

In most cases, these side effects should be temporary. Some may be easily managed, too. If you have any symptoms that are ongoing or that bother you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. But don’t stop using Latuda unless your doctor tells you to.

Latuda may cause mild side effects other than the ones listed above. See the Latuda medication guide for more information.

Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, it tracks and reviews side effects of the medication. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Latuda, visit MedWatch.

In rare cases, serious side effects can occur with Latuda. Serious side effects that have been reported with Latuda include:

If you develop serious side effects while taking Latuda, call your doctor right away. If the side effects seem life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number.

* To learn more about this side effect, see “Side effects explained” below.
† An allergic reaction is possible after using Latuda. But this side effect wasn’t reported in studies.
Latuda has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

Get answers to some frequently asked questions about Latuda’s side effects.

Do side effects of Latuda vary by tablet strength (20 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg, or 120 mg)?

It’s possible. Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow. Depending on the condition Latuda is being used to treat, your doctor may prescribe higher doses of the drug. In this case, you may also use higher strengths of the tablet.

And if you’re prescribed higher doses of Latuda, you may have a higher risk for certain side effects. Your risk for some of these side effects is highest right after your dose is increased. Other side effects may be more likely to happen after you’ve taken high doses for a while.

Side effects of Latuda that may be more common at higher doses include:

You may have questions about your risk for certain side effects based on the strength of Latuda you’re prescribed. If so, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Does Latuda cause memory loss?

No, Latuda isn’t known to cause memory loss. This side effect wasn’t reported in studies of the drug.

But memory loss is a symptom of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia (conditions Latuda is used to treat). So it’s possible you may experience memory loss while using Latuda to treat these conditions. But this is more likely to be a symptom of these conditions than a side effect of the drug itself.

If you experience memory loss while taking Latuda, talk with your doctor. They can discuss your symptoms and help determine if Latuda is right for you.

Could Latuda cause rash or itchiness?

No. Rash and itchiness weren’t side effects reported in studies of Latuda.

But rash and itchiness are possible symptoms of an allergic reaction. Even though allergic reaction wasn’t reported in studies of Latuda, this side effect can still happen. To learn more about allergic reaction, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

Is dry mouth a side effect of Latuda?

Yes, dry mouth is a possible side effect of Latuda. But dry mouth was one of the least common side effects in studies of the drug.

Dry mouth can lead to other symptoms as well, such as:

If you experience bothersome dry mouth or any of its symptoms while taking Latuda, talk with your doctor. They can suggest ways to lessen this side effect.

Could I experience hair loss during Latuda treatment?

Yes, under certain conditions, you may experience hair loss while using Latuda. But this side effect wasn’t reported in studies of the drug.

Hair loss is a possible side effect of other mood stabilizers used to treat bipolar disorder. When used for bipolar depression in adults, Latuda may be prescribed along with the mood stabilizers lithium or valproate. And hair loss is a common side effect of these drugs.

So if you use Latuda with lithium or valproate, you may notice hair loss. But it’s likely that this side effect is caused by lithium or valproate, not Latuda.

If you’re concerned about hair loss while using Latuda, talk with your doctor.

Learn more about some of the side effects Latuda may cause.

Risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia

Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Latuda shouldn’t be used to treat psychosis related to dementia in older adults. Psychosis is a mental health condition that can cause delusions and hallucinations. And dementia is a condition that affects communication, thinking, and memory.

Antipsychotic drugs such as Latuda can raise the risk of death and stroke when used to treat psychosis related to dementia in older people.

Symptoms of stroke can include:

  • headache
  • confusion
  • facial, arm, or leg weakness on one side of your body
  • trouble walking, speaking, or seeing

What might help

If you have symptoms of stroke while taking Latuda, tell your doctor right away.

But you shouldn’t take Latuda if you’re an older adult with psychosis related to dementia. Talk with your doctor about other treatment options that may be a better fit for you.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults

Latuda has a boxed warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA.

Drugs used to treat depression (such as Latuda) can raise the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. This includes thoughts of dying or wanting to take your own life.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors can also lead to other changes in mood. These are discussed in the “Changes in mood” section directly below.

What might help

If you have any suicidal thoughts or behaviors while taking Latuda, call 911 or your local emergency number right away.

Suicide prevention

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Changes in mood (such as anger)

Taking Latuda can cause you to experience changes in mood. These include:

  • anger
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • feeling bothered or irritable
  • feeling violent or aggressive
  • mania or hypomania (moments of abnormally high energy and excitement related to bipolar disorder)

What might help

Tell your doctor about any changes in mood you experience while taking Latuda. They can help determine whether the drug is right for you.

Insomnia

Some people may have insomnia (trouble sleeping) while taking Latuda. Insomnia may cause other symptoms as well, including:

  • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • feeling irritable
  • changes in mood

What might help

To help prevent insomnia, you may want to make a few changes to your bedtime routine. These may include avoiding:

  • watching TV or using your phone while in bed
  • drinking caffeinated beverages right before bedtime
  • doing exercise right before bedtime

Certain over-the-counter (OTC) medications, such as melatonin and Benadryl (diphenhydramine), can also help with insomnia. But you should talk with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any OTC medications with Latuda.

If you experience insomnia while taking Latuda, talk with your doctor. They can suggest other ways to help lessen this side effect.

Movement disorders

Latuda may cause movement disorders, such as slow, uncontrolled, or repetitive muscle movements.

In some cases, movement disorders may have other symptoms, such as:

What might help

Tell your doctor if you experience any of the above symptoms while taking Latuda. In some cases, movement disorders can lead to a medical emergency. It’s important that your doctor knows about your condition right away.

If your symptoms seem life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number.

Allergic reaction

Like most drugs, Latuda can cause an allergic reaction in some people. But this side effect wasn’t reported in studies of the drug.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction can be mild or serious and can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)
  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat, which can make it hard to breathe

What might help

If you have mild symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as a mild rash, call your doctor right away. They may suggest an OTC oral antihistamine such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine), or topical product such as hydrocortisone cream, to manage your symptoms.

If your doctor confirms you had a mild allergic reaction to Latuda, they’ll decide if you should continue using it.

If you have symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, such as swelling or trouble breathing, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. These symptoms could be life threatening and require immediate medical care.

If your doctor confirms you had a serious allergic reaction to Latuda, they may have you switch to a different treatment.

Keeping track of side effects

During your Latuda treatment, consider keeping notes on any side effects you’re having. Then, you can share this information with your doctor. This is especially helpful to do when you first start taking new drugs or using a combination of treatments.

Your side effect notes might include the following:

  • What dose of drug you were taking when you had the side effect.
  • How soon after starting that dose you had the side effect.
  • What your symptoms were from the side effect.
  • How it affected your daily activities.
  • What other medications you were also taking.
  • Any other information you feel is important.

Keeping notes and sharing them with your doctor will help your doctor learn more about how a drug affects you. And your doctor can use this information to adjust your treatment plan if needed.

In certain situations, Latuda may not be safe to use. Read on to learn more about possible warnings for Latuda.

Boxed warnings

Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. It also has a boxed warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults.

A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  • Risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. Latuda shouldn’t be used to treat psychosis related to dementia in older adults. Antipsychotic drugs such as Latuda can raise the risk of death and stroke when used to treat this condition in older people.
  • Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. Drugs used to treat depression (such as Latuda) can raise the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults.

To learn more, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Other warnings

Latuda may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Latuda. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

Lewy body dementia or Parkinson’s disease. If you have Lewy body dementia or Parkinson’s disease, you may have a higher risk for certain side effects from Latuda. These include movement disorders and an increased risk of falling. Before starting Latuda, tell your doctor if you have either of these conditions. They’ll help decide if it’s safe for you to take Latuda.

Bipolar disorder. If you have bipolar disorder, Latuda can raise your risk for mania or hypomania. Before taking Latuda, talk with your doctor about your risk for mania or hypomania.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Latuda or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Latuda. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.

Alcohol use and Latuda

There aren’t any known interactions between Latuda and alcohol. But drinking alcohol while taking Latuda can worsen certain side effects from the drug. This includes the side effect of somnolence. (Somnolence describes feeling drowsy or more sleepy than usual, which can lead to problems with muscle coordination, making decisions, or thinking clearly.)

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about the amount that’s safe for you to drink while taking Latuda.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking Latuda

It isn’t known if Latuda is safe to use during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Studies of Latuda haven’t looked at its use during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. It isn’t known if the drug can pass into breast milk. But according to a National Pregnancy Registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes, withdrawal symptoms and movement disorders have occurred in infants born to mothers who took Latuda during the last 3 months of pregnancy. (See below for more information on this pregnancy registry.)

Symptoms of withdrawal and movement disorders in infants can include:

  • feeling bothered or restless
  • increased or decreased muscle tone
  • refusing to eat certain foods or having trouble eating
  • sleepiness
  • trouble breathing
  • uncontrollable movement of an arm or leg

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant or to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before using Latuda.

If you use Latuda during pregnancy, consider participating in the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics. This registry collects information about the safety of antipsychotic drugs (such as Latuda) when used during pregnancy. For more information, talk with your doctor or visit the registry’s website.

You shouldn’t suddenly stop taking Latuda. Doing so may cause withdrawal symptoms, such as uncontrolled muscle movements and feeling restless.

Don’t stop taking Latuda without first talking with your doctor. They can help determine whether it’s best for you to continue taking Latuda or stop your treatment. If your doctor wants you to stop using Latuda, they’ll slowly lower your doses over time to help prevent withdrawal symptoms.

Latuda is used to treat bipolar depression and schizophrenia in some children.

Most side effects of Latuda in children are expected to be the same as the side effects seen in adults. However, abnormal dreams (such as nightmares) may be more common in children taking Latuda than in adults.

Latuda also has a boxed warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see the “Side effects explained” section above.

Latuda is a long-term treatment option for bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia. Most of its side effects are mild. But you may have serious side effects from Latuda. Examples include movement disorders and changes in metabolism.

If you’re considering Latuda as a treatment option, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about its possible side effects. Here are a few questions you may want to ask:

  • How can I manage the side effects I might have with Latuda?
  • Will other medications I’m taking raise my risk for side effects from Latuda?
  • Will other health conditions I have raise my risk for side effects from Latuda?

If you have bipolar 1 disorder, consider subscribing to the Healthline bipolar disorder newsletter for first-hand stories, trusted advice and mental wellness tips.

* In this article, we use the terms “male” and “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.