If you have schizophrenia or bipolar 1 disorder, your doctor might prescribe Latuda for you.

It’s a prescription drug that adults, adolescents, and some children take for:

To learn more about these conditions and how Latuda is used for them, see the “What is Latuda used for?” section below.

Latuda basics

Latuda contains the drug lurasidone, which is classified as an atypical antipsychotic. It comes as a tablet that you’ll take by mouth.

Latuda isn’t available as a generic drug. Instead, it’s only available in the brand-name form.

In this article, we describe Latuda’s side effects, uses, and more.

Like most drugs, Latuda may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Latuda may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Latuda. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Latuda can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Latuda’s Things to Know handout.

Mild side effects of Latuda that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information on this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Latuda can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Latuda, call your doctor right away. However, if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Latuda that have been reported include:

* For more information on this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Latuda may cause.

Boxed warnings

Latuda has boxed warnings. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Latuda’s boxed warnings are described below.

Increased risk of death in older adults with dementia-related psychosis. Older adults with psychosis related to dementia who are taking antipsychotics have an increased risk of dying. And keep in mind that Latuda is an antipsychotic. (With psychosis, you have an impaired idea of reality. And with dementia, you have loss of memory or other brain functions.)

Most of these deaths occur because of heart failure or infections. Older adults with dementia-related psychosis taking antipsychotics have also been shown to have a higher risk of stroke. But keep in mind that Latuda isn’t used to treat dementia-related psychosis.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children, adolescents, and young adults. Studies show that antidepressants may increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children, adolescents, and young adults. And keep in mind that Latuda is used for depressive episodes in people with bipolar I disorder.

The risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors is believed to be highest during the first few months of antidepressant treatment and whenever your dosage is changed. But, these side effects may occur at any time during treatment.

Some people may have a higher risk for suicidal thoughts or behaviors. For example, people with an increased risk include those who’ve had or whose family members have had:

What might help

Doctors won’t prescribe Latuda for older adults with dementia-related psychosis. Instead they will recommend an alternative medication that’s not associated with this increased risk of death.

Additionally, your doctor will discuss with you the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors with Latuda. They’ll also weigh the benefits and risks of treatment for your condition. Your doctor will closely monitor you while you’re taking Latuda, watching for worsening of your condition and any suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

Your doctor will counsel you, and your caregivers if needed, to look out for any changes in moods and behaviors. Monitoring is especially important when you’re first starting Latuda and when your dosage changes.

Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of these symptoms:

  • thoughts about suicide or dying
  • attempts to die by suicide
  • new or worsened depression, anxiety, or irritability
  • agitation
  • restlessness
  • trouble sleeping
  • panic attacks
  • an extreme increase in activity or talking, which are both symptoms of mania
Suicide Prevention

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Weight gain or weight loss

Antipsychotics, including Latuda, may cause weight gain. It’s thought that antipsychotics cause weight gain because they may influence your body’s metabolism (the chemical reactions happening inside your body).

It’s also possible that people taking Latuda may also develop diabetes and high cholesterol. And these conditions can affect your body weight.

Weight gain is one of the most important factors that causes people to stop treatment with Latuda.

Weight loss wasn’t reported by people taking Latuda in the drug’s initial studies. But after Latuda received approval for use, one study found that people had some weight loss.

Specifically, people who took Latuda for at least 12 months, on average, lost a small amount of weight. However, more research is needed before scientists know whether Latuda or another factor caused their weight loss.

What might help

While you’re taking Latuda, your doctor will monitor your weight. You can also regularly check your weight at home with a bathroom scale. Be sure to report any significant weight changes to your doctor.

Your doctor will consider the effect of weight gain with Latuda treatment. And they’ll recommend an antipsychotic for you that has the lowest effect on your body weight and metabolism. Taking this effect into consideration may help you take Latuda without stopping because of certain side effects.

If you’re concerned about weight gain when taking Latuda, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may suggest tips to help you avoid gaining weight with this drug. Or, they may recommend an alternative treatment for your condition.

Sleepiness

You might feel very sleepy when you’re taking Latuda. In fact, this is a common side effect of the drug.

What might help

Because Latuda can make you feel sleepy, you shouldn’t drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how the drug affects you.

Also, keep in mind that alcohol can also cause you to feel sleepy. So talk with your doctor before drinking alcohol while you’re taking Latuda.

If you’re concerned about feeling sleepy during the daytime, you can take Latuda in the evening or nighttime. (But make sure to eat a minimum of 350 calories with your Latuda dose.)

Also, talk with your doctor about your concerns regarding sleepiness with Latuda. They may suggest ways to help manage sleepiness while you’re taking this drug.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Latuda.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • hives
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Latuda. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Latuda. They will also explain how much to take and when to take it. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking Latuda

Latuda comes as tablets that you’ll take by mouth once each day. It’s available in strengths of:

  • 20 milligrams (mg)
  • 40 mg
  • 60 mg
  • 80 mg
  • 120 mg

You should take Latuda with a meal that contains at least 350 calories. And it’s important to take Latuda at the same time every day.

Dosage

Depending on the reason you’re taking Latuda, your doctor will prescribe an appropriate dosage. Your doctor may start you on a low dose of the drug and increase your dose if needed.

If you’re an adult with schizophrenia, the maximum dose of Latuda you can take is 160 mg. But if you’re an adult with bipolar 1 disorder, the maximum dose you can take is 120 mg.

The maximum dose of Latuda for children and adolescents is 80 mg.

Taking Latuda with other drugs

People with schizophrenia or bipolar 1 disorder may need different combinations of medications for their condition.

For example, adults with bipolar 1 disorder who are taking lithium (Lithobid) or valproate (Depakote) may also take Latuda. But, Latuda may also be used alone to treat this condition.

Questions about taking Latuda

Below, we answer some common questions about taking Latuda.

  • What if I miss a dose of Latuda? If you miss a dose of Latuda, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. But if it’s close to when your next dose is due, just skip the missed dose. Then, take your next scheduled dose as usual. If you’re unsure about when to take your next dose, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Will I need to use Latuda long term? It depends on what you’re using Latuda to treat. For schizophrenia, you’ll likely use the drug long term if Latuda works to manage your symptoms. For depressive episodes related to bipolar disorder, you may use the drug either short term or long term. Your doctor can discuss with you how long you should take Latuda.
  • Can Latuda be chewed, crushed, or cut in half? No, you should not chew, crush, or cut Latuda tablets in half. Instead, you must take the tablets whole.
  • Should I take Latuda with food? Yes, you should take Latuda with food that contains a minimum of 350 calories.
  • How long does Latuda take to work? How long it takes for Latuda to work may vary from person to person. Talk with your doctor to find out how long Latuda will take before it starts working for your condition. Studies looked at Latuda’s effectiveness for schizophrenia and bipolar 1 disorder after 6 weeks of treatment. But your condition may respond to treatment sooner than that.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Latuda and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions, such as:
    • How will Latuda affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So, don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Latuda.

Will I have withdrawal symptoms if I stop taking Latuda?

No, you won’t have withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking Latuda.

But, newborns who had exposure to an antipsychotic during the last trimester of pregnancy may have withdrawal symptoms after birth. (And keep in mind that Latuda is an antipsychotic.)

Possible withdrawal symptoms that a newborn may have include:

  • agitation
  • shaking
  • increased or decreased muscle tone
  • sleepiness
  • breathing problems
  • trouble feeding

Be sure to talk with your doctor before taking this drug while pregnant. And for more information about using Latuda during pregnancy, see the “What should be considered before taking Latuda?” section below.

How does Latuda compare with Abilify or Vraylar?

Like Latuda, Abilify and Vraylar are atypical antipsychotics used for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

In addition, Abilify is used for other conditions, including:

Latuda, Abilify, and Vraylar all have a boxed warning for increased risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. They also have a boxed warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children, adolescents, and young adults. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information about these warnings, see the “What are Latuda’s side effects?” section above.

Unlike Abilify and Latuda, Vraylar is only used in adults.

To see a detailed breakdown of Latuda versus Abilify, check out this drug article. And, for a side-by-side comparison of Latuda and Vraylar, see this drug article.

What’s the half-life of Latuda?

The half-life of a drug is the time it takes for half of a dose of the medication to leave your body. Doctors use the half-life of a medication to find out how long the medication will stay in your body. Usually, after four or five half-lives, the medication is fully eliminated from your system.

For Latuda, the half-life of a 40-mg tablet is 18 hours.

If you have questions about how long Latuda may last in your body, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Is Latuda used to treat anxiety or bipolar 2 disorder?

No, Latuda isn’t used for anxiety. And it’s also not used to treat bipolar 2 disorder. Instead, Latuda is used to treat:

With bipolar 1 disorder, you have at least one manic episode, but most of your symptoms are depressive. During manic episodes, you may have increased activity and feel very happy or excited. With bipolar 2 disorder, on the other hand, you have at least one hypomania episode and one depressive episode. A hypomania episode is a mania episode that’s shorter in length and less intense.

If you have questions about whether Latuda is right for your condition, talk with your doctor.

How does Latuda work?

It’s still not known for sure how Latuda works to treat schizophrenia and bipolar 1 disorder.

It’s thought that the medication works on serotonin and dopamine receptors (attachment sites) in your brain. The brain chemicals serotonin and dopamine may be involved in schizophrenia and bipolar 1 disorder.

Will Latuda cause hair loss?

No, Latuda shouldn’t cause hair loss. But if you think that Latuda is affecting your hair, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

If you have schizophrenia or bipolar 1 disorder, your doctor might prescribe Latuda for you.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used to treat:

  • schizophrenia in adults and adolescents ages 13 years and older
  • depressive episodes of bipolar 1 disorder in adults and children ages 10 years and older
  • depressive episodes of bipolar 1 disorder in adults who are also taking either:
    • valproate (Depakote)

With schizophrenia, which is a disorder of the brain, you may have:

  • hallucinations
  • delusions (strongly believing something that’s false)
  • disturbances in your thoughts, perceptions, and behaviors

With bipolar 1 disorder, you have at least one manic episode. But it’s more common to have depressive episodes than manic episodes. During manic episodes, you may feel excessively happy and excited. And you may have symptoms of psychosis. This is unlike depressive episodes, during which you can feel sad or depressed.

It’s not known for sure how Latuda works. But it’s thought that the drug may affect dopamine and serotonin receptors (attachment sites) in your brain. The brain chemicals serotonin and dopamine may play an important role in schizophrenia and bipolar 1 disorder.

Some important things to discuss with your doctor when considering Latuda treatment include:

  • your overall health
  • any medical conditions you may have
  • whether you’re pregnant or considering pregnancy

Also, tell your doctor if you’re taking any medications. This is important because some medications can interfere with Latuda.

These and other considerations to discuss with your doctor are described below.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Latuda, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take (including prescription and over-the-counter types). Also, describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Latuda.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Latuda can interact with several types of drugs. These drugs include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Latuda. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur when taking Latuda.

Other interactions

Grapefruit can also interact with Latuda. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice blocks the action of an enzyme (a type of protein) called CYP3A4. This enzyme helps to eliminate Latuda from your body. So, eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice may increase the amount of Latuda in your body.

On the other hand, the herbal remedy St. John’s wort induces the action of CYP3A4. This means it makes the enzyme more active than usual. This lowers the amount of Latuda in your body. So, you should avoid taking St. John’s wort while you’re taking Latuda.

Boxed warnings

Latuda has boxed warnings. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Latuda has a boxed warning for increased risk of death in older adults with psychosis that’s related to dementia. (With psychosis, you have an impaired idea of reality. And with dementia, you have loss of memory or other brain functions.)

This drug also has a boxed warning for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children, adolescents, and young adults.

For more information about these warnings, see the “What are Latuda’s side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

Latuda may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Latuda. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Tardive dyskinesia. With tardive dyskinesia, you have uncontrollable body movements. Your risk of having tardive dyskinesia with Latuda increases if you need to take the drug long term. Higher doses of Latuda can also increase your risk of tardive dyskinesia. Some people can develop tardive dyskinesia at low doses taken over a short period or even after stopping the drug. Stopping Latuda can partially or completely resolve this side effect. If you need to take Latuda long term, your doctor will weigh the benefits of treatment and the risks of tardive dyskinesia.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Latuda or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Latuda. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome. With neuroleptic malignant syndrome, you may have a very high fever, muscle stiffness, and changes in your mental state. If you have any symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome with Latuda, your doctor will have you stop taking the drug. You’ll also receive treatment for neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
  • Increased prolactin levels. Latuda acts on receptors (binding sites) for the brain chemical dopamine. Because of this, it may increase your levels of a hormone called prolactin. With higher prolactin levels, you may develop changes in your reproductive system. For females,* this could include discharge from nipples and lack of periods. For males,* this could include breast enlargement and impotence. If you’re concerned about how increased prolactin levels from Latuda may affect your sexual or reproductive health, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Low white blood cell counts. Low white blood cell counts may occur while you’re taking Latuda. If you have a low white blood cells count before starting Latuda, your doctor will check your blood cell counts regularly during the first few months of treatment. If your white blood cell count drops further, your doctor will have you stop taking Latuda. Your doctor may also closely monitor you for fever or other signs and symptoms of infection. (Infection is possible with a low white blood cell count.)
  • Low blood pressure when getting up from a seated or lying position. Latuda may cause your blood pressure to drop significantly when you get up from a seated or lying down position. This type of low blood pressure is called orthostatic hypotension. With this condition, you might feel dizzy or lightheaded. If you are already taking blood pressure medications, are dehydrated (have a low fluid level), or have had heart or blood vessel problems in the past, your risk is increased. If you develop orthostatic hypotension while taking Latuda, your doctor may lower your dose of Latuda. Then, they may slowly increase your Latuda dose again.

* In this article, we use the terms “male” and “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For more information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Use with alcohol

Some medications may interact with alcohol. But Latuda isn’t one of them. However, alcohol may worsen some side effects of Latuda, including sleepiness.

Before starting Latuda, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it’s safe for you to drink alcohol.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

The effects of Latuda in pregnancy haven’t been studied.

But, studies of other antipsychotic drugs have been done. They suggest that Latuda may cause withdrawal symptoms in newborns if the babies had exposure to Latuda during the third trimester of pregnancy.

Possible withdrawal symptoms that may occur in newborns after delivery include:

  • agitation
  • increase or decrease in muscle tone
  • shaking
  • sleepiness
  • breathing difficulty
  • trouble with feeding

If you use Latuda during pregnancy, consider enrolling in Latuda’s pregnancy registry. Pregnancy registries collect information about the effects of a drug during pregnancy. This information can help researchers better understand the drug’s risks if used during pregnancy.

To enroll in the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics and report side effects of Latuda during pregnancy, call 866-961-2388. Or visit the registry’s site. And be sure to talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Latuda during pregnancy.

It’s also not known whether Latuda passes into breast milk or if it affects how your body makes breast milk. The effect on breastfed children of people taking Latuda is also unknown. If you’re breastfeeding, your doctor will weigh the benefits and risks of having you take Latuda.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Latuda in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Latuda manufacturer’s website to see if they have support options.

Don’t take more Latuda than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects. If you take too much Latuda, your doctor may closely monitor you for symptoms of overdose.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by a Latuda overdose can include:

What to do in case you take too much Latuda

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Latuda. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use their online resource. However, if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you have questions about taking Latuda, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Your doctor can tell you about other treatments available for your condition. Here’s a list of articles that you might find helpful.

Some questions to ask your doctor about Latuda may include:

  • Is it OK to consume caffeine while I’m using Latuda?
  • Can I drive while taking Latuda?
  • Will Latuda make me feel high?
  • How long does Latuda stay in your system?
  • Can I take both Latuda and lamotrigine (Lamictal)?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.