If you have ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease, your doctor might suggest Entyvio (vedolizumab) as a treatment option. As a result, you could be looking for more information about the drug, such as details about its dosage.

Entyvio is a prescription medication that’s used to treat the following conditions in adults:

  • moderately to severely active UC
  • moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease

Entyvio is part of a group of drugs called integrin receptor antagonists. Integrin is a protein that can cause inflammation in the digestive tract. Entyvio blocks the effects of integrin, which helps decrease the inflammation caused by UC and Crohn’s disease.

Entyvio is a biologic drug. (A biologic is made from parts of living organisms.) A healthcare professional will give you the drug as an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein given over time).

This article describes the dosages of Entyvio, including its form, strength, and how to take the drug. To learn more about Entyvio, see this in-depth article.

Note: This article covers Entyvio’s typical dosages, which are provided by the drug’s manufacturer. But your doctor will prescribe the Entyvio dosage that’s right for you.

This section covers common dosage information about Entyvio.

What is Entyvio’s form?

Entyvio comes as a powder in a single-dose vial. A healthcare professional will mix sterile water with the powder. Then they will give you the mixture as an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein given over time).

What strength does Entyvio come in?

Entyvio comes in only one strength: 300 milligrams (mg).

What are the typical dosages of Entyvio?

When you start Entyvio treatment, you’ll receive your first few doses more frequently than later doses. This is called the induction phase. It helps Entyvio start working to decrease the symptoms of your condition or make them go away.

Then you’ll receive Entyvio less frequently to help manage your symptoms. This is called the maintenance phase.

The information below describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended.

Dosage for ulcerative colitis

For treating ulcerative colitis (UC), you’ll receive three IV infusions of Entyvio over the course of 6 weeks. Each infusion is 300 mg of the drug given over 30 minutes. The dosing schedule is as follows:

  • first dose: week 0
  • second dose: week 2
  • third dose: week 6

After your third dose of Entyvio, you’ll receive a fourth dose of the drug 8 weeks later. At this time, your doctor will decide if you should continue receiving Entyvio. If the drug is working to manage your UC symptoms, you’ll likely continue to have an Entyvio infusion once every 8 weeks.

Dosage for Crohn’s disease

The dosage for Crohn’s disease is the same as it is for UC. (For specifics, see the section just above.) After your fourth dose of Entyvio, your doctor will decide if you should continue receiving the drug. This will be based on whether it’s working to manage your symptoms of Crohn’s disease.

Is Entyvio used long term?

Yes, Entyvio is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. How long you’ll use Entyvio for depends on whether the drug is working to manage the symptoms of your condition. If you and your doctor determine that Entyvio is safe and effective for you, it’s likely that you’ll use it long term.

If you’re starting therapy with Entyvio, you may have questions about the medication. Here are some commonly asked questions and answers.

Can I get my dose of Entyvio every 4 weeks?

It’s not likely. Getting a dose of Entyvio every 4 weeks isn’t recommended.

Studies compared receiving Entyvio every 4 weeks with receiving it every 8 weeks for treating ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. Researchers found that the 4-week dosing schedule didn’t provide any benefit over the 8-week dosing schedule.

If you have questions about Entyvio’s recommended dosage, talk with your doctor.

What is a loading dose? And does Entyvio require this type of dose?

A loading dose is a higher dose of medication given at the beginning of treatment. This decreases the time it takes to see a benefit from the medication.

Entyvio doesn’t have a loading dose. Instead, it has what is called an induction phase: You’ll receive 300 milligrams (mg) of the drug at week 0, week 2, and week 6. This helps ease or get rid of the symptoms of the condition you’re treating.

You’ll then receive another 300-mg dose of the drug 8 weeks later. At this time, if the drug is found to be safe and effective for your condition, your doctor will suggest that you continue using it.

Your dose will continue to be 300 mg, and you’ll receive it once every 8 weeks. This is called a maintenance phase, and it helps manage the symptoms of your condition.

For more information about Entyvio’s dosing schedule, talk with your doctor.

A healthcare professional will give you Entyvio as an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein given over time). You’ll receive the infusion at your doctor’s office or a clinic, and it will typically take 30 minutes.

If you have questions about the Entyvio IV infusion, talk with your doctor.

If you miss an appointment to receive a dose of Entyvio, let your doctor know right away to reschedule.

To help remember your Entyvio infusion appointments, try setting a reminder on your phone or marking your appointments on a calendar.

The sections above describe the typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Entyvio for you, they will prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

Here are some examples of questions that you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Should my dosage of Entyvio change if it isn’t working for me?
  • Does my dosage of Entyvio need to change if I’m taking other drugs with it?
  • Would a different dosage raise or lower my risk of side effects from Entyvio?
  • Will my maintenance dosage of Entyvio change over time?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.