If you have migraine, your doctor may suggest Qulipta as a treatment option. It’s a prescription medication used to help prevent migraine episodes in adults.

Qulipta isn’t taken to treat migraine episodes as they happen. Instead, it’s taken every day to help prevent migraine episodes.

Qulipta basics

Qulipta contains the active drug atogepant. (An active drug is an ingredient that makes a medication work.) It belongs to a group of migraine medications called calcitonin gene-related peptide blockers. This drug is not available as a generic.

Qulipta comes as tablets that you swallow.

Keep reading for details about Qulipta, including the drug’s side effects, use for helping to prevent migraine episodes, cost, and more.

Like most drugs, Qulipta may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Qulipta may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you take

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Qulipta. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Qulipta can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Qulipta’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of Qulipta that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Qulipta can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Qulipta, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Allergic reaction is a possible serious side effect of Qulipta.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Qulipta. While allergic reaction wasn’t reported in studies of Qulipta, it can still occur.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, usually in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Qulipta. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Qulipta is prescribed to help prevent migraine episodes in adults.

Migraine is a condition that causes intense headaches that may affect a person’s ability to function. These are referred to as migraine headaches or migraine episodes. Some people also have other symptoms, such as nausea, trouble speaking, and sensitivity to sound or light.

Qulipta isn’t taken to treat migraine episodes as they happen. Instead, it’s taken every day to help prevent migraine episodes.

Qulipta works to help prevent migraine episodes by blocking the activity of a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Your body makes this protein naturally. In people with migraine, CGRP may cause pain and inflammation in the nervous system. To learn more about CGRP treatments for migraine like Qulipta, check out this article.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Qulipta in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. A program called Qulipta Complete may help lower the cost of this drug.

You can also check out this article to learn more about saving money on prescriptions.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Qulipta.

How does Qulipta compare with Nurtec ODT?

Qulipta and Nurtec ODT (rimegepant) are medications prescribed for migraine in adults.

Both Qulipta and Nurtec ODT may be used to help prevent migraine episodes. But Nurtec ODT may also be used to treat migraine episodes as they happen. Qulipta isn’t used to treat migraine episodes when they occur.

Qulipta and Nurtec ODT both belong to a group of migraine medications called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) blockers.

If you’d like to learn more about how Qulipta and Nurtec ODT compare, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

What’s Qulipta’s mechanism of action?

How a drug works is referred to as its mechanism of action.

Qulipta works by blocking the activity of a protein called CGRP. CGRP is a protein your body makes naturally. In people with migraine, CGRP may cause pain and inflammation in the nervous system.

To learn more about CGRP treatments for migraine like Qulipta, check out this article.

If you’d like to learn more about how Qulipta works, talk with your pharmacist or doctor.

Is hair loss a side effect of Qulipta?

No, hair loss is not a known side effect of Qulipta. In studies of Qulipta, hair loss was not reported in people who took the drug.

But hair loss has been reported with another migraine drug, Aimovig (erenumab-aooe), since it became available on the market. Like Qulipta, Aimovig is a kind of CGRP medication. (For more information, see the section just above.)

Note that stress can lead to hair loss. Stress can also trigger a migraine episode in some people. So it’s possible that stress related to migraine can cause hair loss.

If you’re concerned about hair loss and migraine treatment, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Qulipta that’s right for you. Below are commonly prescribed dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Form

Qulipta comes as tablets that you swallow.

Strengths: 10 mg, 30 mg, 60 mg

Qulipta tablets come in three strengths:

  • 10 milligrams (mg)
  • 30 mg
  • 60 mg

Recommended dosage

You’ll take Qulipta once per day.

Questions about Qulipta’s dosage

Below are some common questions about Qulipta’s dosage.

  • What if I miss a dose of Qulipta? If you miss a dose of Qulipta, try to take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s nearly time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regularly scheduled time. And do not take more than one dose of Qulipta to make up for a missed dose.
  • Will I need to take Qulipta long term? You’ll likely take Qulipta long term if you and your doctor agree that the drug is safe and working well for you.
  • How long does Qulipta take to work? Qulipta begins working as soon as you take a dose. In studies of the drug, some people reported fewer migraine episodes within 1 week of starting Qulipta. But it can take up to 12 weeks for the drug’s effects to take hold.

Certain factors may affect how well Qulipta works to help prevent migraine. These include your medical history and any medications you may take. Below are some of the important considerations to discuss with your doctor before you start taking Qulipta.

Interactions

Taking a medication with certain vaccines, foods, and other things can affect how the medication works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Qulipta, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including both prescription and over-the-counter ones. Also, describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Qulipta.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Qulipta can interact with several kinds of drugs. These include:

This list does not contain all kinds of drugs that may interact with Qulipta. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with Qulipta.

Warnings

Qulipta may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Qulipta. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Kidney problems, including any requiring dialysis. If you have severe kidney problems or are undergoing dialysis, your doctor will likely prescribe a lower dose of Qulipta. Severe kidney problems can affect your body’s ability to rid itself of Qulipta after you take a dose. Your doctor can provide more information about the dose of Qulipta that is right for you.
  • Liver problems. Doctors usually won’t prescribe Qulipta to people with severe liver problems. Severe liver problems can make it hard for your body to rid itself of Qulipta after you take a dose. If you have liver problems, let your doctor know. They can discuss with you whether Qulipta is safe for you to take.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Qulipta or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Qulipta. Ask them what other medications are better options for you.

Qulipta and alcohol

There are no known interactions between alcohol and Qulipta.

But alcohol can trigger a migraine episode for some people. If alcohol is a migraine trigger for you, consuming alcohol could affect how well Qulipta works to help prevent your migraine episodes.

If you consume alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe to drink while you’re taking Qulipta.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

It’s not known whether it’s safe to take Qulipta while pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant or breastfeed, talk with your doctor. They can discuss with you safe treatments for your condition.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Qulipta. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions.

Taking Qulipta

Qulipta comes as tablets that you swallow. Try to take this medication around the same time each day. This can help keep a consistent level of Qulipta in your body.

Accessible medication containers and labels

If it’s hard for you to read the label on your prescription, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Certain pharmacies may provide medication labels that:

  • have large print
  • use braille
  • contain a code you can scan with a smartphone to change the text into audio

Your doctor or pharmacist may be able to recommend a pharmacy that offers these options if your current pharmacy doesn’t.

Also, if you’re having trouble opening your medication bottles, let your pharmacist know. They may be able to put Qulipta in an easy-open container. Your pharmacist may also recommend tools to help make it simpler to open the drug’s container.

Questions about taking Qulipta

Below are some common questions about taking Qulipta.

  • Can Qulipta be chewed, crushed, or split? The manufacturer of Qulipta hasn’t stated whether the drug may be chewed, crushed, or split. If you’re having trouble swallowing pills, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may have suggestions to help you take Qulipta. You can also check out these tips for taking pills.
  • Should I take Qulipta with food? You may take Qulipta doses with or without food.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Qulipta and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will Qulipta affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Do not take more Qulipta than your doctor prescribes. Taking more than this can lead to serious side effects.

What to do in case you take too much Qulipta

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Qulipta. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you’re considering treatment with Qulipta, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Ask questions to help you feel more comfortable about the drug and your treatment options. Here are some suggestions to get you started:

  • What should I know about other treatments for migraine besides Qulipta?
  • If I have side effects with Qulipta, can I try a different calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) treatment?
  • Will I have withdrawal symptoms if I need to stop taking Qulipta?

For more information about migraine medications, see the following article:

If you’re looking to join a community of people who also live with migraine, check out Bezzy Migraine. And to get updates on migraine treatments and tips for managing headache pain, subscribe to Healthline’s migraine newsletter.

Q:

Will I need to take other migraine medications with Qulipta?

Anonymous

A:

It’s possible that you’ll take other migraine medications with Qulipta.

Qulipta is prescribed to help prevent migraine episodes in adults. It’s not meant to treat migraine episodes as they happen. So your doctor may also prescribe a medication that you take to treat a migraine episode when one occurs.

The following medications are generally safe to take with Qulipta. This list doesn’t include all medications that can be taken with Qulipta.

Work with your doctor to decide on the best migraine treatment plan for you. This includes discussing any migraine medications you’ll use together with Qulipta.

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.