Vitamin K is an important nutrient that plays a vital role in blood clotting and bone and heart health.

While vitamin K deficiency is rare, suboptimal intake may impair your health over time. Inadequate intake may impair blood clotting, weaken your bones, and increase your risk of heart disease (1, 2).

For this reason, you should make sure to obtain plenty of this vitamin from your diet. Getting the Daily Value (DV) of 120 mcg should prevent insufficiency in most people.

Here are 20 foods that provide especially high amounts of vitamin K, plus a few lists categorized by food group.

Which foods contain vitamin K?

Vitamin K is a group of compounds divided into two groups — K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone).

Vitamin K1, the most common form, is mainly found in plant foods, especially dark leafy greens. K2, on the other hand, is only found in animal foods and fermented plant foods, such as natto (3).

The following 20 foods are good sources of vitamin K (4).

1. Kale (cooked) — 443% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 531 mcg (443% of the DV)
100 grams: 817 mcg (681% of the DV)

2. Mustard greens (cooked) — 346% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 415 mcg (346% of the DV)
100 grams: 593 mcg (494% of the DV)

3. Swiss chard (raw) — 332% of the DV per serving

1 leaf: 398 mcg (332% of the DV)
100 grams: 830 mcg (692% of the DV)

4. Collard greens (cooked) — 322% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 386 mcg (322% of the DV)
100 grams: 407 mcg (339% of the DV)

5. Natto — 261% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 313 mcg (261% of the DV)
100 grams: 1,103 mcg (920% of the DV)

6. Spinach (raw) — 121% of the DV per serving

1 cup: 145 mcg (121% of the DV)
100 grams: 483 mcg (402% of the DV)

7. Broccoli (cooked) — 92% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 110 mcg (92% of the DV)
100 grams: 141 mcg (118% of the DV)

8. Brussels sprouts (cooked) — 91% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 109 mcg (91% of the DV)
100 grams: 140 mcg (117% of the DV)

9. Beef liver — 60% of the DV per serving

1 slice: 72 mcg (60% of the DV)
100 grams: 106 mcg (88% of the DV)

10. Pork chops — 49% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 59 mcg (49% of the DV)
100 grams: 69 mcg (57% of the DV)

11. Chicken — 43% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 51 mcg (43% of the DV)
100 grams: 60 mcg (50% of the DV)

12. Goose liver paste — 40% of the DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 48 mcg (40% of the DV)
100 grams: 369 mcg (308% of the DV)

13. Green beans (cooked) — 25% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 30 mcg (25% of the DV)
100 grams: 48 mcg (40% of the DV)

14. Prunes — 24% of the DV per serving

5 pieces: 28 mcg (24% of the DV)
100 grams: 60 mcg (50% of the DV)

15. Kiwi — 23% of the DV per serving

1 fruit: 28 mcg (23% of the DV)
100 grams: 40 mcg (34% of the DV)

16. Soybean oil — 21% of the DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 25 mcg (21% of the DV)
100 grams: 184 mcg (153% of the DV)

17. Hard cheeses — 20% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 25 mcg (20% of the DV)
100 grams: 87 mcg (72% of the DV)

18. Avocado — 18% of the DV per serving

Half of a fruit, medium: 21 mcg (18% of the DV)
100 grams: 21 mcg (18% of the DV)

19. Green peas (cooked) — 17% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 21 mcg (17% of the DV)
100 grams: 26 mcg (22% of the DV)

20. Soft cheeses — 14% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% of the DV)
100 grams: 59 mcg (49% of the DV)

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The best sources of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) are dark, leafy green vegetables. In fact, the prefix “phyllo” in this vitamin’s name refers to leaves.

1. Beet greens (cooked) — 290% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 349 mcg (290% of the DV)
100 grams: 484 mcg (403% of the DV)

2. Parsley (fresh) — 137% of the DV per serving

1 sprig: 164 mcg (137% of the DV)
100 grams: 1,640 mcg (1,367% of the DV)

3. Cabbage (cooked) — 68% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 82 mcg (68% of the DV)
100 grams: 109 mcg (91% of the DV)

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Fatty meats and liver are excellent sources of vitamin K2, though the content varies by the animal’s diet and may differ between regions or producers. Keep in mind that research on the vitamin K2 content of animal foods is incomplete (5, 6, 7, 8, 9).

1. Bacon — 25% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 30 mcg (25% of the DV)
100 grams: 35 mcg (29% of the DV)

2. Ground beef — 7% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 8 mcg (7% of the DV)
100 grams: 9.4 mcg (8% of the DV)

3. Pork liver — 6% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 6.6 mcg (6% of the DV)
100 grams: 7.8 mcg (7% of the DV)

4. Duck breast — 4% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 4.7 mcg (4% of the DV)
100 grams: 5.5 mcg (5% of the DV)

5. Beef kidneys — 4% of the DV per serving

3 ounces: 4.9 mcg (4% of the DV)
100 grams: 5.7 mcg (5% of the DV)

6. Chicken liver — 3% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 3.6 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 13 mcg (11% of the DV)

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Dairy foods and eggs are decent sources of vitamin K2.

Like meat, their vitamin content depends on the animal’s diet, and specific values may vary by region or producer.

1. Jarlsberg cheese — 19% of the DV per serving

1 slice: 22 mcg (19% of the DV)
100 grams: 80 mcg (66% of the DV)

2. Soft cheeses — 14% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% of the DV)
100 grams: 59 mcg (49% of the DV)

3. Edam cheese — 11% of the DV per serving

1 slice: 13 mcg (11% of the DV)
100 grams: 49 mcg (41% of the DV)

4. Blue cheese — 9% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mcg (9% of the DV)
100 grams: 36 mcg (30% of the DV)

5. Egg yolk — 5% of the DV per serving

1 large: 5.8 mcg (5% of the DV)
100 grams: 34 mcg (29% of the DV)

6. Cheddar — 3% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 3.7 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 13 mcg (11% of the DV)

7. Whole milk — 3% of the DV per serving

1 cup: 3.2 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 1.3 mcg (1% of the DV)

8. Butter — 2% of the DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 3 mcg (2% of the DV)
100 grams: 21 mcg (18% of the DV)

9. Cream — 2% of the DV per serving

2 tablespoons: 2.7 mcg (2% of the DV)
100 grams: 9 mcg (8% of the DV)

7 more fruits high in vitamin K

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Fruits generally don’t contain as much vitamin K1 as leafy green vegetables, but a few provide decent amounts.

1. Blackberries — 12% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV)
100 grams: 20 mcg (17% of the DV)

2. Blueberries — 12% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV)
100 grams: 19 mcg (16% of the DV)

3. Pomegranate — 12% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV)
100 grams: 16 mcg (14% of the DV)

4. Figs (dried) — 6% of the DV per serving

5 pieces: 6.6 mcg (6% of the DV)
100 grams: 16 mcg (13% of the DV)

5. Tomatoes (sun-dried) — 4% of the DV per serving

5 pieces: 4.3 mcg (4% of the DV)
100 grams: 43 mcg (36% of the DV)

6. Grapes — 3% of the DV per serving

10 grapes: 3.5 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 15 mcg (12% of the DV)

7. Red currants — 3% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 3.1 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 11 mcg (9% of the DV)

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Some legumes and nuts provide decent amounts of vitamin K1 but generally much less than leafy greens.

1. Soybeans (cooked) — 13% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 16 mcg (13% of the DV)
100 grams: 33 mcg (28% of the DV)

2. Sprouted mung beans (cooked) — 12% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 14 mcg (12% of the DV)
100 grams: 23 mcg (19% of the DV)

3. Cashews — 8% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 9.7 mcg (8% of the DV)
100 grams: 34 mcg (28% of the DV)

4. Red kidney beans (cooked) — 6% of the DV per serving

1/2 cup: 7.4 mcg (6% of the DV)
100 grams: 8.4 mcg (7% of the DV)

5. Hazelnuts — 3% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 4 mcg (3% of the DV)
100 grams: 14 mcg (12% of the DV)

6. Pine nuts — 1% of the DV per serving

10 nuts: 0.9 mcg (1% of the DV)
100 grams: 54 mcg (45% of the DV)

7. Pecans — 1% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 1 mcg (1% of the DV)
100 grams: 3.5 mcg (3% of the DV)

8. Walnuts — 1% of the DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mcg (1% of the DV)
100 grams: 2.7 mcg (2% of the DV)

The richest sources of vitamin K1 are dark, leafy green vegetables. For example, just 1/2 cup (65 grams) of cooked kale provides 443% of the DV.

To get the most out of this vitamin in kale and other plant foods, consider eating them with butter or oil. That’s because vitamin K is fat-soluble and may be better absorbed when combined with fat.

Vitamin K2 is only found in animal foods and certain fermented dishes. Small amounts are also produced by your gut bacteria (10).

Natto, a Japanese dish made from fermented soybeans, is one of the best sources of vitamin K2. Other good sources include meat, liver, and cheese (11).

Evidence suggests that the metabolism and functions of vitamin K1 and K2 are slightly different, though this isn’t fully understood. While dietary guidelines don’t currently distinguish between the two, it’s probably a good idea to include both types in your diet (12, 13, 14).

Vitamin K can be found in numerous plant and animal foods. Although deficiencies are rare, it’s important to ensure that you’re getting enough of this essential vitamin through your diet.

Dark leafy greens are especially rich in this vitamin, with numerous types providing well over 100% of the DV in a single serving. Certain types of liver are good sources as well.

If you’re looking to up your vitamin K intake, look no further than the foods on this list.

Just one thing

Try this today: The next time you buy fresh beets, don’t throw out the leaves. Cook up the greens as a side dish that packs a hearty dose of vitamin K.