Acne is a common skin condition that affects around 85% of young adults (1).

It’s caused by various factors, such as increased sebum and keratin production, hormones, acne-causing bacteria, inflammation, and blocked pores (2).

Although various acne treatments are available, including benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and niacinamide, many people are looking for natural alternatives.

Recently, derma drink has gained popularity on social media as a supplement containing nutrients found naturally in fruits and vegetables — with many anecdotal reports that it’s highly effective.

However, there’s little research on its effectiveness, safety, and side effects.

This article reviews derma drink, its benefits, side effects, and more.

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Derma drink is a nutritional beverage that claims to treat acne and breakouts.

Unlike most skin care products that work on the surface of your skin, derma drink is claimed to treat the underlying cause of acne by strengthening the immune system with concentrated vitamins and minerals.

However, it’s important to note these claims aren’t scientifically proven.

One bottle of derma drink contains the following nutrients (3):

  • Vitamin A: 10,500 mcg, 1,167% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin E: 14.7 mcg, 98% of the DV
  • Zinc: 24 mg, 218% of the DV
  • Selenium: 24 mcg, 44% of the DV
  • Sodium: 10 mg, less than 1% of the DV

Also, derma drink contains undisclosed amounts of several other ingredients, including purified water, citric acid, copper gluconate, sucralose, potassium sorbate, potassium benzoate, xanthan gum, and natural flavors.

However, per recommendations on the company website, manufacturers advise taking two bottles of derma drink per day. As such, you’ll consume twice the amount of the nutrients above daily for the advised duration based on your skin condition.

Derma drink is made in the United States and can be purchased online through their website.

Summary

Derma drink is a nutritional product that claims to treat acne internally with a large dose of vitamins and minerals. However, these claims aren’t scientifically proven.

Currently, no scientific studies have investigated derma drink’s effect on acne.

However, research on the individual ingredients found in derma drink suggests it may help reduce acne and breakouts, as well as prevent their recurrence.

First, derma drink is high in vitamins A, E, and zinc, which may help reduce redness, acne, and inflammation on the skin and within the body (4, 5, 6, 7).

For example, a 3-month study in 164 participants with mild-to-moderate acne found that taking a supplement containing vitamin E and zinc twice daily significantly reduced acne and signs of inflammation, compared with those in a placebo group (6).

Another study including 150 participants compared the diets of those with acne to those with healthy skin. The study found that people with acne had significantly lower blood levels of vitamins E, A, and zinc than those with healthy skin (8).

Research suggests supplementing with selenium may help increase glutathione (GSH) levels. This antioxidant appears to play a role in fighting inflammation and acne (9, 10, 11).

However, it’s worth noting that these studies did not use vitamins A, E, zinc, and selenium in the amounts found in derma drink. Therefore, it’s unclear whether supplementing in the amounts found in derma drink is any more beneficial.

Summary

Research has shown that the individual nutrients in derma drink appear to help treat acne. However, the studies did not use these nutrients in the amounts found in derma drink, and no studies have investigated the effectiveness of derma drink for acne.

As noted earlier, there are no scientific studies on derma drink.

However, based on the ingredients found in derma drink, research suggests it may have other potential health benefits.

Packed with antioxidants

Derma drink contains high amounts of nutrients that function as antioxidants.

Antioxidants are compounds that neutralize unstable molecules called free radicals. When levels of free radicals become too high in the body, they can cause cellular damage, which is linked to chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes (12).

Also, nutrients like selenium in derma drink act as a glutathione cofactor. This means it’s a substance the body needs for glutathione activity (13).

Glutathione is one of the most important antioxidants in the body. It plays a role in various aspects of your health, such as brain health, fighting insulin resistance, and skin conditions like psoriasis, wrinkles, and skin elasticity (14, 15, 16, 17).

May boost your immunity

Derma drink is high in nutrients, including vitamins A, E, zinc, and selenium, all of which may help strengthen your immune system.

As mentioned above, all of these nutrients act as antioxidants, which help combat oxidative stress (12).

Also, a deficiency in any of these nutrients may harm immune cell function, which may impair your immune response (18, 19, 20).

Lastly, research suggests that nutrients such as zinc, vitamin A, and selenium appear to aid wound healing (21, 22, 23).

Summary

In addition to potentially helping treat acne, the combination of nutrients in derma drink may help increase your body’s antioxidant status and support your immune system.

Several health risks may come along with taking derma drink.

Derma drink contains very high amounts of vitamins A and E, which are fat-soluble vitamins. This means they are both stored in your body, and excess consumption may lead to toxic blood levels of these vitamins.

Consuming excess preformed vitamin A — the kind found in most supplements — may cause a condition called hypervitaminosis A. It can cause dizziness, nausea, headaches, pain, and even death in severe cases (24).

Similarly, consuming excess vitamin E from supplements may cause nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, fatigue, weakness, blurred vision, rashes, bruising, and increased bleeding risk (25, 26).

Lastly, taking supplements high in certain antioxidants has been linked to other important health risks, such as reduced exercise performance, an increased risk of cancer, and congenital disabilities (24, 27, 28, 29).

It’s also worth noting that no short- or long-term scientific studies have investigated the safety of derma drink in humans, so research is needed in this area before recommending it.

Summary

Derma drink contains excessively high levels of nutrients, especially vitamins A and E, which can pose various health problems. Also, high antioxidant supplements may harm your health.

Derma drink can be purchased online through the company website.

Manufacturers claim the following dosage is effective for your skin condition (3):

  • Emerging breakouts: 2 bottles per day for 2–3 days
  • Mild acne: 2 bottles per day for 4–6 days
  • Moderate acne: 2 bottles per day for 6–8 days
  • Severe acne: 2 bottles per day for 16–21 days

You can purchase derma drink in either a 4-, 8-, or 16-day supply at the following prices (3):

  • 4-day supply (8 bottles): $44.99
  • 8-day supply (16 bottles): $64.99
  • 16-day supply (32 bottles): $109.99

The price includes free shipping within the United States, and discounts are sometimes offered on the website.

Summary

Derma drink is relatively costly and starts at $44.99 for a 4-day supply. The number of bottles you’re advised to take varies based on your skin condition, and dosage recommendations can be found on the company website.

Derma drink is a nutritional beverage that claims to treat acne internally.

Although research on its individual nutrients suggests it may have potential, no scientific studies have proven that derma drink treats acne.

Also, derma drink contains excessively high amounts of fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins A and E, which may pose serious health concerns. High doses may cause nausea, headaches, fatigue, weakness, blurred vision, and increased bleeding risk.

Due to the health concerns linked to high doses of these nutrients, derma drink shouldn’t be advised for acne until long-term studies on its safety and effectiveness are available.