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Alongside the rise in popularity of high end stationary bikes from Peloton and Echelon, the overall demand for stationary bikes has soared.

These high end options might be too expensive for many people who want to enjoy the health benefits of indoor cycling. However, there are some more affordable options.

Why are people choosing to add an exercise bike to their home gym?

For those who love to ride, an exercise bike can offer a way to do it without having to worry about time of day or weather. You also won’t have to keep an eye out for cars or pedestrians while you ride!

One systematic review found that indoor cycling can increase aerobic capacity and, when combined with diet changes, can help improve cholesterol levels, contribute to weight loss, and reduce blood pressure (1).

When handles and arm movement are included, your upper body can also get in on the workout. Many stationary bikes offer various resistance levels, making interval training possible too.

To help you in your search for an affordable exercise bike, we’ve compiled a list of several types of budget-friendly indoor exercise bikes that offer a wide variety of features.

When deciding which bikes should make the cut, we considered:

  • Special features. More affordable exercise bikes may not always have the same features as more expensive models, but we tried to include bikes with features that stood out from the pack.
  • Type. We included a variety of exercise bike styles: recumbent, upright, and indoor cycling (where you head is above the handlebars, most similar to Peloton and Echelon bikes).
  • Price. We know budgets vary, but we tried to make sure all the bikes on this list cost less than $400.
  • Customer feedback. There are some things only those who have actually used a particular exercise bike will know. We know this information matters to you, so we made sure to consider what real consumers were saying.
  • Vetting. All the companies and bikes on this list have been vetted by Healthline for their business practices and safety.

A note on price

General price ranges with dollar signs ($–$$$) are indicated below. One dollar sign means the product is rather affordable, whereas three dollar signs indicate a higher cost.

Generally, prices range from $150–$400, though this may vary depending on where you shop.

Pricing guide

  • $ = under $200
  • $$ = $200–$300
  • $$$ = over $300

Best overall

Sunny Health & Fitness Programmable Recumbent Bike

  • Price: $$$
  • Levels of resistance: 16
  • Display: yes, color meter display
  • Built-in classes: 12 preset workouts
  • Style: recumbent
  • Pulse sensor: yes

This recumbent exercise bike tops the list because of the number of features it offers for the price.

In addition to 16 levels of resistance and 12 preset workouts, the bike has a tablet holder so you can use your favorite fitness app to access even more workouts. It also features a wide seat with a mesh seatback to help keep you cool.

The bike is easy to get on thanks to a step-through style, and you can use the side handle to adjust the seat while you’re sitting in it. It also has a bottle holder, wheels to help move it out of the way, and non-slip pedals with adjustable straps.

Pros

  • 16 levels of resistance and 12 preset workouts
  • includes a tablet holder
  • breathable mesh seatback to add comfort and support for those who need it

Cons

  • higher price than some other options on our list
  • some complaints of wiring and belt problems

Best for multitasking

FlexiSpot Adjustable Exercise Workstation Bike Desk

  • Price: $$$
  • Levels of resistance: 8
  • Display: no
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: no

If you’re working or studying from home, this desk is a great way to avoid sitting still for hours on end.

Although it’s otherwise no-frills, it features a built-in desk surface large enough to hold a laptop, notebook, and phone. And thanks to its transport wheels, you can roll it out of the way when you’re not using it.

The bike includes eight resistance levels and is designed so that the seat and desk are easy to adjust. You won’t have a monitor to track your progress, but that way you also won’t be distracted from your work.

Pros

  • includes a desk to work on
  • easily adjustable seat and desk
  • has transportation wheels to make it easier to move out of the way between work sessions

Cons

  • may actually cost a bit more than $400, depending on what color you want and where you buy it
  • battery not included
  • no monitor to help you track your data

Best for the office

DeskCycle 2

  • Price: $
  • Levels of resistance: 8
  • Display: yes, removable 6-function LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: desk pedals
  • Pulse sensor: no

These pedals are ideal if you work in an office. They’re heavy enough that they won’t slide around during use, and their low profile/adjustable pedal height allows them to be used with desks as low as 27 inches.

Because it’s important to keep noise down in an office, these pedals use the quietest form of resistance, magnetic resistance, for the eight preset levels.

The LCD monitor displays your strides per minute, distance, calories burned, and time, so you can keep track of your progress while you work.

Pros

  • fits under desks as low as 27 inches
  • 8 magnetic resistance levels
  • LCD monitor that tracks strides per minute, distance, calories burned, and time

Cons

  • no built-in classes
  • does not include a seat
  • individuals with longer legs may find the tops of their legs hitting their desk as they pedal

Best recumbent

ProForm 325 CSX Recumbent Bike

  • Price: $$$
  • Levels of resistance: 22
  • Display: yes, 5-inch high contrast display
  • Built-in classes: 24 preset workouts
  • Style: recumbent
  • Pulse sensor: yes

The ProForm 325 stands out for the number of extra features it includes.

This recumbent bike offers 22 levels of resistance and 24 preset workouts. For a cycling-class experience at home, you can connect your phone to the bike’s built-in speaker system. (The bike is iFit-enabled and comes with a 30-day free trial.)

It also features wheels for transport, a fan, a 5-inch display, a drink holder, and an oversized seat with a cushioned backrest. The step-through design makes it easier to get on than more traditional bikes.

To help protect your investment, it comes with a 10-year frame warranty and a 1-year warranty on parts and labor.

Pros

  • includes 22 resistance levels and 24 preset workouts
  • iFit- and Bluetooth-enabled (30-day iFit membership is included with purchase)
  • oversized seat with a cushioned backrest for comfort

Cons

  • more expensive than some other options on our list
  • membership fees required to use iFit($396/year for Yearly Family Plan, $39/month for a Monthly Family Plan, or $180/year for a Yearly Individual Plan)

Best upright

Schwinn Fitness 130 Upright Exercise Bike

  • Price: $$$
  • Levels of resistance: 16
  • Display: yes, 5.5-inch LCD
  • Built-in classes: 13 preset workouts, classes available with tablet and app subscription
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: yes

This upright exercise bike stands out for the number of exercise class options it offers.

When paired with a tablet and two app subscriptions (Explore the World and Zwift) that feature more than 1,000 unique classes, this upright bike can provide a similar experience to high end options like Peloton and Echelon.

It’s also Bluetooth-enabled so you can connect the bike to your preferred fitness app to help track your progress.

When deciding whether this bike fits your budget, you’ll want to keep in mind the additional expense of monthly subscriptions ($14.99/month for Zwift and $9.99/month for Explore the World).

If you’re willing to spend a little more money (over $500), Schwinn has a version of this bike called the 170 Upright Exercise Bike that offers even more exercise class options.

Pros

  • 16 levels of resistance
  • 13 preset workouts, plus compatibility with Explore the World and Zwift apps
  • enhanced Bluetooth connectivity to track your workout data in apps

Cons

  • monthly subscription costs if you chose to use Zwift or Explore the World
  • must provide your own tablet or smartphone to watch classes

Best for small spaces

Ativafit R8 Foldable Exercise Bike

  • Price: $
  • Level of resistance: 8
  • Display: yes, LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: recumbent
  • Pulse sensor: yes

This bike can be folded in half to save space between workouts. It also has wheels to help you roll it out of the way.

The X-shaped design helps riders feel stable on the bike despite its smaller footprint, and built-in arm resistance bands allow a full-body workout without taking up much additional space.

You can track your heart rate, speed, time, and distance on the LCD monitor. You can also adjust the seat and handlebars for a more comfortable ride.

While it doesn’t have built-in classes, it includes a tablet holder, so you can watch videos or use an app to complete workouts.

Pros

  • folds up and has wheels to move out of the way between workouts
  • large seat with backrest for comfort
  • very budget-friendly price tag

Cons

  • no built-in preset classes
  • designed for riders 5 feet 1 inch to 6 feet 2 inches; won’t work for shorter or taller people
  • relatively low weight limit of 275 pounds

Best recumbent folding

XTERRA Fitness FB350 Folding Exercise Bike

  • Price: $
  • Levels of resistance: 8
  • Display: yes, 2-inch x 1-inch LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: recumbent
  • Pulse sensor: yes

Recumbent bikes generally take up more space than upright options, but this highly portable exercise bike from XTERRA Fitness folds into a small size for easy storage and has wheels for easier transport.

Although compact, it features a comfortable padded seat, a pulse sensor, and a pocket for your phone.

Something to consider is that while this bike has a lower price point, it doesn’t offer built-in classes. It also has only a 2-inch x 1-inch LCD window, and the weight capacity maxes out at 225 pounds.

Pros

  • folds for easy storage
  • includes wheels for easy transport
  • budget-friendly price point, especially for a recumbent bike

Cons

  • lacks built-in classes
  • display window is only 2 inches by 1 inch

Best upright folding

Marcy Foldable Upright Exercise Bike

  • Price: $
  • Level of resistance: 8
  • Display: yes, LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: no

If you prefer upright bikes but need something portable and compact, this one is a great choice. The seat height is adjustable to accommodate most statures, and the bike is sturdy despite weighing less than 40 pounds (18 kg).

While this bike has a relatively low price, one thing to keep in mind is that it doesn’t come with a lot of the bells and whistles more expensive options offer. It has no built-in classes or pulse sensors and has only a small LCD window.

Pros

  • 8 resistance levels
  • weighs less than 40 pounds (18 kg) and folds up
  • has 5 seat height options

Cons

  • no built-in classes
  • no pulse sensors
  • has only a small LCD window

Best indoor cycling exercise bike

Exerpeutic Bluetooth Indoor Cycling Smart Exercise Bike

  • Price: $$
  • Levels of resistance: infinite resistance options
  • Display: no
  • Built-in classes: yes, with tablet and app subscription
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: no

Although it doesn’t feature a display of its own, this bike has Bluetooth connectivity and a tablet holder so you can use your own app.

The bike is designed to be used with the MyCloudFitness app, which tracks your workout stats and offers several workout videos and programs.

This particular app has a free version and a premium version, which will cost $14.99/month. (The premium version includes the app’s personal coaching programs and its Scenic World Tour Ride.)

One design feature that’s particularly useful when streaming classes is the ability to stand up and cycle (simulating an uphill climb). Some users say they miss having a pulse sensor, though.

Pros

  • includes a wide tablet holder
  • workouts can be tracked with the MyCloudFitness app
  • design allows user to stand up and cycle

Cons

  • no display
  • lower user weight capacity (only 220 pounds)
  • uses friction instead of magnetic resistance

Best with an extended weight capacity

Exerpeutic Gold Heavy Duty Foldable Exercise Bike

  • Price: $$
  • Levels of resistance: 8
  • Display: yes, LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: yes

Most stationary bikes have a weight capacity of 250–300 pounds (113–136 kg), so they can’t accommodate people who weigh more than that. However, this one has a weight capacity of 400 pounds (181 kg), as well as a wide seat cushion for larger bodies.

This sturdy bike is also foldable and has wheels for portability. It offers eight levels of resistance and a display that shows calories burned, distance, time, speed, and pulse rate. However, it does not include built-in classes.

Pros

  • weight capacity of 400 pounds (181 kg) and wide seat cushion
  • foldable with wheels for easier transport
  • 8 resistance levels

Cons

  • no built-in classes
  • no tablet holder

Best for comfort

YOSUDA Indoor Cycling Bike

  • Price: $$$
  • Level of resistance: infinite resistance adjustments possible
  • Display: yes, LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: no

Two-way adjustable handlebars, a padded seat that’s adjustable four ways, and a large range of resistance make exercising on the YOSUDA a more comfortable biking experience.

Additionally, a water bottle holder makes it easy to stay hydrated during a workout, and transport wheels make it easier to move the bike out of the way afterward.

Although this bike does have an iPad holder to allow for streaming your favorite shows and workouts, it’s not as integrated with built-in classes as the other indoor cycling style bike higher up on our list is — the Exerpeutic Indoor Cycling Smart Exercise Bike. It does not come with a pulse sensor. Its friction resistance will also require more maintenance than magnetic resistance would.

Pros

  • includes iPad holder and water bottle holder
  • has transport wheels to help move the bike between workouts
  • designed with adjustable handlebars and four-way adjustable padded seat for comfort

Cons

  • no built-in classes
  • no pulse sensor
  • friction instead of magnetic resistance

Best for short riders

Marcy Exercise Upright Fan Bike

  • Price: $$$
  • Level of resistance: air resistance to match pedaling speed
  • Display: yes, LCD
  • Built-in classes: no
  • Style: upright
  • Pulse sensor: no

If you’re under 5 feet tall, it can be hard to find an exercise bike that will fit comfortably. This bike can be adjusted to fit someone with a 21-inch inseam. (And for those sharing their bike with a taller individual, it can adjust up to a 33-inch inseam.)

While air resistance is a louder form of resistance, the fan’s cool air can be a welcome comfort for those who tend to work up a sweat during workouts.

The bike includes wheels to make it easier to move out of the way after workouts. It also has an LCD monitor that tracks speed, time, distance, and calories.

While it may not be the best fit for those who love preset exercise programs, it does have handles that will work your arms at the same time as your legs.

Pros

  • can be adjusted to fit someone with a 21-inch inseam
  • fan offers a cool breeze while working out
  • moving handles for an upper body workout at the same time

Cons

  • air resistance is louder and can’t be mechanically controlled
  • batteries are not included
  • no built-in exercise programs

PriceResistance levelsStyleDisplayPulse sensorConsiderations
Sunny Health & Fitness Programmable Recumbent Bike $$$16recumbentyes, color meter displayyesincludes 12 preset workouts, tablet holder, bottle holder, transport wheels, and mesh seatback for comfort
FlexiSpot Adjustable Exercise Workstation Bike Desk $$$ (black, with desktop)8uprightnoneno• includes a desktop to work on
• no screen or tracking devices
DeskCycle 2 $8desk pedalsyes, removable 6-function LCDnono seat or built-in classes
ProForm 325 CSX Recumbent Bike $$$22recumbentyes, 5-inch high contrast displayyes• includes 24 preset workouts, transport wheels, a fan, a drink holder, and an oversized seat with a cushioned backrest
• iFit-enabled, but after the 30-day free trial, a subscription cost will be required ($396/year for a Yearly Family Plan, $39/month for a Monthly Family Plan, or $180/year for a Yearly Individual Plan)
Schwinn Fitness 130 Upright Exercise Bike $$$16uprightyes, 5.5-inch LCDyes• includes 13 preset workouts and is Bluetooth-enabled
• compatible with Zwift and Explore the World apps, but these require monthly subscription costs ($14.99/month for Zwift and $9.99/month for Explore the World)
Ativafit Indoor Cycling Bike $8recumbentyes, LCD yes• folds and has wheels to help move it out of the way between workouts
• no built-in preset workouts, but does have a tablet holder so you can watch classes on your own device
XTERRA Fitness FB350 Folding Exercise Bike $8recumbentyes, 2-inch x 1-inch LCDyes• folds and has wheels to help move it out of the way
• has no built-in preset workouts, and the LCD data window is only 2 inches x 1 inch
Marcy Foldable Upright Exercise Bike $8uprightyes, LCDno• weighs less than 40 pounds (18 kg) and folds up
• has no built-in preset classes
Exerpeutic Bluetooth Indoor Cycling Smart Exercise Bike $$infinite resistance adjustmentsuprightnono• has a tablet holder
• designed to connect with the MyCloudFitness app, which has a free version to help track basic workout metrics
Exerpeutic Gold Heavy Duty Foldable Exercise Bike $$8uprightyes, LCDyes• has a weight capacity of 400 pounds (181 kg), as well as a wide seat cushion for larger bodies
• does not include a tablet holder or built-in classes
YOSUDA Indoor Cycling Bike $$$infinite resistance adjustmentsuprightyes, LCDno• has adjustable handlebars, four-way adjustable padded seat, water bottle holder, and iPad holder
• no built-in classes
Marcy Exercise Upright Fan Bike$$$air resistance to match pedaling speeduprightyes, LCDno• can be adjusted for someone with a 21-inch inseam
• does not have built-in classes, but moving arm handles make an upper body workout possible

First, to choose your own affordable exercise bike, you’ll need to know exactly how much you’re willing to spend. All bikes on this list cost less than $400, but several models are right around the $200 mark.

Just be aware that the less expensive bikes will generally have fewer features and may be made with lower quality materials.

Additionally, you’ll want to consider the cost of an app subscription if you want unlimited access to workouts.

Next, choose the style of bike you want — upright, recumbent, or indoor cycling-style.

Upright bikes keep you in an upright position, while recumbent bikes feature a backrest and keep you in a more reclined position.

Indoor cycling bikes mimic standard outdoor bicycles, so during heavy workouts, you’ll be leaning forward with your head over the handlebars. For reference, both Peloton and Echelon offer indoor cycling bikes.

Finally, there may be other features you’re looking for. To replicate the experience of a high end bike, you’ll want to make sure the one you choose has a tablet holder.

Other important features you may want to look for are drink holders, an extended weight capacity, and the option to fold the bike for storage.

Do cheap exercise bikes work?

The price tag on an exercise bike won’t always tell you the whole story. An exercise bike may cost less because it’s on sale, has fewer features, comes from a less-known brand, or is made from more easily sourced materials.

Before buying any exercise bike, you’ll want to read customer reviews and think about the features most important to you to help determine whether a particular bike will work for you.

How much is a decent exercise bike?

Exercise bikes range greatly in price, from less than $200 to more than $2,000.

The amount you should expect to pay for a quality bike will depend on which features you’re expecting. Bikes under $500 will typically not have large touch screens or as many built-in workout programs, and they may have simpler forms of resistance.

As the cost increases, you can expect the bike to include features such as a swiveling touch screen, more resistance levels, the ability to livestream exercise classes, app storage for your data, and Bluetooth speakers.

Why are exercise bikes so expensive?

Exercise bikes can be expensive because of the cost of materials, the number of features/amount of technology a bike includes, or just the name of the brand on the bike. When choosing a bike, you’ll want to assess whether the reason for its price is worth the cost to you.

With the advent of high end workout bikes from brands like Peloton, many people have renewed interest in indoor cycling and at-home cycling classes. However, these bikes’ high prices make them an unrealistic purchase for many people.

Fortunately, several styles of stationary bikes are available for $450 or less and offer a variety of features. With one of these affordable exercise bikes, you can reap the health benefits of indoor cycling workouts without breaking your budget.