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A quick look at the best at-home testosterone kits

Low testosterone levels can occur in people of any age. An underlying health problem like a pituitary gland disorder or an injury can reduce testosterone levels. Cancer treatments may also be a cause.

One way to check your testosterone levels is to take an at-home testosterone test. In this article, we’ll go over our picks for some of the best at-home testosterone test kits. We’ll also cover the symptoms and diagnosis of low testosterone.

Testosterone is a sex hormone produced in the testicles and ovaries. Production of testosterone ramps up during puberty and begins to gradually decline in adulthood.

It’s often considered the “male” sex hormone, but people of all sexes and genders produce testosterone. People assigned male at birth (AMAB) produce more testosterone than people assigned female at birth (AFAB), though.

Your body uses testosterone for many purposes, including:

  • development and function of reproductive organs, including the penis, testicles, and ovaries
  • voice deepening during puberty
  • development of facial hair and body hair as well as the progression of balding later in life
  • development, growth, and strength of bones
  • muscle mass and body fat distribution
  • sex drive (libido)
  • production of sperm
  • production of red blood cells

Testosterone levels may also play a role in regulating your mood and supporting cognitive function, though research is still inconclusive on exactly how this works. A decrease in testosterone levels is a normal part of aging for people assigned male at birth, especially after age 30.

When your testosterone levels are too high (hypergonadism) or too low (hypogonadism), you may experience uncomfortable symptoms. A blood or saliva test can check the amount of testosterone your body is making.

In males, testosterone levels should generally fall between 300–1,000 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL), or 10–35 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L).

In females, the testosterone levels produced in the ovaries are quite low, between 15–70 ng/dL, or .5–2.4 nmol/L.

A note on gender

You’ll notice that some of the language used to share stats and other data points is pretty binary, i.e. “male” and “female” or “men” and “women.”

Although we typically avoid language like this, specificity is key when reporting on research participants and clinical findings.

Unfortunately, not all resources regarding sex hormones report data on, or include, participants who are transgender, nonbinary, gender nonconforming, genderqueer, or agender.

We encourage you to talk with a healthcare professional if you need support navigating how the information in this article may apply to you.

Low testosterone may affect about 10 percent of men over 30, and up to 40 percent of men over 70.

Low T levels may cause different symptoms depending on your age, your sex assigned at birth, and whether or not you’re undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as part of a gender transition.

In adults assigned male at birth

If you’re AMAB and you aren’t intentionally modifying your hormone levels, symptoms of low testosterone levels (hypogonadism) may include:

  • erectile dysfunction
  • lowered sex drive
  • low semen volume
  • smaller testicle size
  • anemia or low blood counts
  • decreased muscle and/or bone mass
  • increased body fat, especially around the breasts
  • decreased body and/or facial hair
  • fatigue
  • hot flashes
  • trouble concentrating, depression, or other mood or cognitive changes

Consider talking with a healthcare professional if you experience any of these symptoms and suspect that you may have low or decreased testosterone. Low T can be a normal part of aging, but drastic or rapid changes could indicate a health condition that may need treatment.

In adults assigned female at birth

For AFAB adults who aren’t intentionally modifying their hormone levels, research is limited into what low testosterone feels like. There also isn’t a set guideline for what constitutes low T in this population.

Some symptoms, which are largely attributed to low estrogen levels, may include:

  • fatigue or sluggishness
  • menstrual irregularities
  • vaginal dryness
  • loss of bone density
  • lowered sex drive
  • trouble sleeping
  • problems with fertility
  • unintentional weight gain
  • mood changes, including depression

Consider talking with a healthcare professional if you experience any of these symptoms and suspect that you may have low or decreased testosterone. Again, since research is limited for low testosterone levels for AFAB adults, the symptoms could vary from those listed above.

The onset of menopause, dysfunction of the pituitary or adrenal glands, or problems with ovarian health could be causing your hormone levels to shift, and you may need to seek treatment or support managing symptoms.

You may need to check your testosterone levels if you’re experiencing any symptoms associated with low T, regardless of your age or sex.

Keeping an eye on your testosterone levels is important for transgender men and transmasculine people using masculinizing HRT, also known as female-to-male testosterone therapy or simply T therapy.

Before you start T therapy, your healthcare provider will need to check your base levels of the sex hormones testosterone and estrogen so you can take an appropriate dose of T to achieve the level of masculinization you want.

Current guidelines suggest getting your levels checked every 3 months for the first year that you’re on HRT and every 6–12 months afterward.

Monitoring your testosterone levels is important because taking too much testosterone can have adverse effects like metabolic problems, while doses that are too low may induce a hypogonadism-like state and could cause significant losses in bone density.

Not to mention, if your testosterone levels aren’t high enough, you may not experience the masculinization you desire or you may notice changes happening very slowly.

Remember, though, that it can take several years for the maximum effects of T therapy to develop. Plus, not everyone taking T will experience the same effects — everybody is different!

A note on accessing gender-affirming hormone replacement therapy

The best option is to work with a healthcare professional you trust, such as a primary care physician or endocrinologist experienced in trans health or an LGBTQIA+ health clinic.

However, finding trans-informed medical providers isn’t always realistic, especially as it’s increasingly difficult to access gender-affirming healthcare — including T therapy — in many states.

If you’re struggling to access HRT in your area, this map maintained by trans activist Erin Reed can help you find a clinic that operates on an informed consent basis. That means you won’t need to provide a letter from a therapist or go through other gatekeeping measures to start HRT.

Alternately, trans-led telemedicine services like Plume and Folx Health may be able to provide you with the care you deserve.

And these resources could help you identify a healthcare professional who is an LGBTQIA+ ally.

If you’re taking an at-home testosterone test, the type of collection method used to test testosterone levels may vary. Different types of collection methods may include blood samples, urine samples, or saliva samples.

Testosterone levels vary throughout the day and are highest in the morning. For this reason, your test instructions may say that you should collect samples between 7:00 and 10:00 a.m.

A blood test for testosterone can tell a healthcare professional how much free testosterone is circulating in your blood. It can also show the total amount of the hormone in your body.

One study from 2016 indicates that measuring free testosterone is a better way to diagnose hypogonadism accurately.

Remember that many factors can affect total testosterone levels, and high or low levels do not necessarily indicate a clinical problem.

Some factors that could lead to decreases in T levels might include:

  • your age
  • your weight
  • disorders of the testicles, pituitary gland, or brain
  • use of medications, especially anticonvulsants
  • use of tobacco, alcohol, or caffeine
  • liver disease
  • hyperthyroidism
  • type 2 diabetes
  • sleep apnea
  • chronic narcotic use, like heroin or methadone

You may be tempted to test your testosterone levels using one of the home testosterone testing products you’ve seen advertised. Before you try a test kit, make sure you understand:

  • how it works
  • how reliable it is
  • what information it will give you
  • what to do with your results

For the brands listed, we reviewed each of their medical and business practices, including:

  • their ratings, reviews, and accreditations from the Better Business Bureau
  • the health claims they make, and whether or not they’re acceptable and accurate
  • the accuracy of results and if they provide assistance after results are delivered

Many products are available for testing your hormone levels at home before seeing your doctor. All of these examine either your saliva, urine, or blood. How you collect your sample and how many samples you take may vary depending on the product.

All home test kits require you to mail your collections to a certified lab for testing. You may get the results within a few days or a few weeks.

Best overall at-home testosterone kit: LetsGetChecked***

Price: $69-$179

LetsGetChecked offers testosterone testing kits that use a finger prick to measure testosterone levels in the blood. After you collect your sample, you send it to the lab on the same day you collect it using prepaid shipping supplies.

Within 2 to 5 days, your results will be available to you online. If you have questions, there’s a team of nurses available 24/7 to help explain your results.

LetsGetChecked offers four at-home tests that include testosterone testing:

  • Testosterone Test ($69): Only testosterone testing
  • Male Hormone Test ($139): Testosterone testing, sex hormone binding globulin, and free androgen index
  • Male Hormone Plus ($159): Contains all from Male Hormone Test kit, plus Prolactin and Estradiol results
  • Male Hormone Advanced ($179): Contains all from Male Hormone Plus kit, plus Cortisol results

Pros

  • testing labs are CLIA approved and CAP-accredited
  • test results arrive quickly and digitally
  • the company has a team of nurses that can help explain your results

Cons

  • tests require a finger prick
  • testing is limited to certain days of the week (samples should not be collected or mailed Friday through Sunday)
  • results are not descriptive

Best medical support testosterone kit: Everlywell

Price: $49

Everlywell’s at-home testosterone kit tests your saliva to see if you’re producing the average amount of testosterone for your age. After you collect your saliva sample, you mail it off to the Everlywell labs in prepaid shipping, and within days you’ll receive online results that indicate whether your testosterone levels are normal, low, or high.

In addition to their testosterone kit, Everlywell has a more extensive Men’s Health kit at a higher price point.

Pros

  • results are easy to read
  • collection samples are pain-free

Cons

  • doesn’t give specific time frame for results
  • tests aren’t available in some states

Best for testing blood and saliva: myLAB Box***

Price: $259

myLAB Box offers an at-home men’s health test that measures testosterone levels, as well as cortisol, estradiol, and DHEA. Like other tests in this list, you collect your samples — both saliva and a finger prick — and send them off to their labs. The company claims the finger prick is 100 percent pain-free, and results should arrive online within 5 days of sending results to the lab.

Pros

  • pain-free sample collection
  • tests are FDA registered
  • multiple hormones are tested

Cons

  • tests aren’t available outside of United States
  • tests are more expensive than other brands

Most affordable at-home testosterone kit: Verisana***

Price: $49.95-$219.95

If you’re experiencing symptoms of depression, potency issues, weight gain, increased body fat, or fatigue, Verisana’s testosterone testing kit might be for you. Verisana uses saliva to test testosterone levels. Once you collect your sample and mail it to the lab, Verisana will send you a detailed report with your results.

Verisana offers a few tests that measure testosterone, including:

Pros

  • once ordered, tests are delivered immediately
  • company gives results based on age
  • company offers multiple tests that measure testosterone

Cons

  • there are no medical professionals available to answer questions about results
  • tests are unavailable in some states

Most comprehensive at-home test: Roman

Price: $69

The Roman testosterone testing kit is provided through Ro, a telemedicine men’s health company. It may be a good choice for someone who is intimidated by or unfamiliar with taking their own blood samples.

Step-by-step video guidance is available to help you through the sample collection process, and you can connect with live agents if you need additional assistance. When your results have been analyzed, you’ll receive an emailed PDF report — usually within about four business days.

Pros

  • test results arrive within four business days
  • comprehensive test kit includes step-by-step video instructions, access to live support, and a cell phone stand so you can watch hands-free

Cons

  • tests require a finger prick
  • not available in Maryland, Alaska, or Hawaii
  • there are no medical professionals available to answer questions about results

Most personalized results: Cerascreen

Price: $59

Cerascreen offers quick and easy testing by using saliva to measure testosterone levels. Once you take your saliva sample, you set up an online account with Cerascreen and answer a questionnaire that will help give you personalized recommendations with your results. Results take 3 to 5 days to return to you via an online portal.

Pros

  • results are given with personalized medical advice
  • tests use saliva, which is painless
  • tests are shipped same-day if ordered by 2pm

Cons

  • testosterone tests are new for the company, so there are few reviews
  • tests aren’t available in all states

If you decide to measure your testosterone levels with a home kit, you should be prepared to take any necessary next steps. The laboratory results should come with an explanation of your measured testosterone level.

If your level is considered normal, but you still have symptoms that concern you, it’s a good idea to talk with a healthcare professional like a doctor or endocrinologist.

If your results come back as lower than average, make an appointment to see a doctor before trying any home remedies. Over-the-counter testosterone supplements aren’t approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and could carry a risk of side effects, especially if you’re taking other medications.

Plus, at-home test kits aren’t likely as accurate as in-office lab tests. A doctor may want to double-check your levels before recommending any treatment.

Not to mention, low T can sometimes be a sign of a serious underlying medical condition. It’s important to work with a professional to rule out or treat any conditions.

It’s important to choose a home testosterone kit produced by a reputable brand that delivers results on a timeline that works for you. You might also want to think about costs, collection methods, and whether the brand connects you with medical professionals to go over your results. Some other qualities to look out for are:

  • Results delivery time. Some at-home testosterone kits take longer to return your results than others. If you’re experiencing uncomfortable symptoms that could be associated with low T, you may want to spring for a kit that offers faster results.
  • Collection methods. Testosterone levels can be tested in your saliva or your blood. While blood tests are considered more reliable, most people have an easier time collecting saliva samples. Be sure to think through which method you’d prefer.
  • Access to support. Some companies connect you with in-house medical professionals, who can help you decipher your test results and talk over next steps if your levels are out of the normal range. Ask yourself how confident you are in your ability to understand your results and determine whether this kind of support is important to you.
  • Affordability. The at-home testosterone kits on our list range from $49 to more than $200. Most insurance plans won’t cover these kits, so be sure to keep that in mind as you consider your budget.
  • Brand integrity. When submitting your sample for analysis, you’re trusting the lab with potentially sensitive health information. It’s important to choose a brand that you feel will respect your privacy. It may be a good idea to read reviews from real consumers before selecting a testosterone kit.

A note about at-home tests

Whichever test you decide is best for you, talking with a doctor or specialist to go over your results with you will help you determine the next best steps. Some doctors may require a lab test to confirm results before moving forward.

NamePriceResultsSample typeOther callouts
LetsGetChecked$69-
$179
2 to 5 days; onlineblood samplenurses available 24/7 for questions
Everlywell$49within days (no exact number given)saliva sampleresults reviewed by independent board-certified physician in your state
myLabBox$259within 5 daysblood and saliva samplesFDA registered tests; test multiple hormones
Verisana$49.95- $219.95N/Asaliva sampleimmediate delivery of test
Roman$694 daysblood samplestep-by-step video guidance of instructions
Cerascreen$593 to 5 dayssaliva samplepersonalized recommendations based on questionnaire and your results

Research suggests that only about 5 to 10 percent of men with low testosterone are receiving treatment.

If a medical professional diagnoses you with low T, there are several treatment options available.

Depending on the cause(s) of your low T, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes as a front-line treatment. These could include influencing your weight, switching medications, and cutting back on alcohol or tobacco.

Your healthcare provider might also suggest that you start testosterone replacement therapy, a medical intervention through which you supplement your body’s natural T levels by taking synthetic testosterone.

Some popular types of T therapy include:

  • skin patch
  • topical gels
  • injections
  • oral medications

Each method comes with its own risks and benefits, and some might not be available in certain areas. Talk through your options with a medical professional like a physician or endocrinologist to choose the type that’s right for you.

Most people with low T begin to experience symptom relief within four to six weeks of starting T therapy, though some changes like muscle mass development can take a little longer.

If you’re trans and using HRT as part of your transition, your healthcare team can adjust your dose if your levels are consistently too low or too high. Talk with your provider(s) about your dose if you’re concerned.

Are at-home testosterone tests accurate?

Before you rely on the results of a testosterone home test kit, you should be aware of the accuracy of salivary testing versus blood testing.

Testing saliva is easier and less invasive than drawing blood. Still, testosterone in saliva samples can be affected by how they’re collected and stored, so researchers are interested in whether this method is reliable.

The results and expert opinions are mixed.

Some studies and reviews suggest that saliva testing is preferable because it’s less stressful for the patient. A 2016 study concluded that saliva is a reliable method to determine testosterone levels.

But there has not been enough analysis of commercial home testing kits. Whether they deliver accurate, reliable, and unvarying results has not been confirmed.

Are at-home testosterone kits as accurate as doctor-administered testosterone tests?

Research into at-home testosterone kits is lacking. It’s unclear how accurate they are compared with tests ordered by a doctor in a lab.

However, it’s safe to say that an in-office testosterone test will be less subject to human error. Doctors, especially endocrinologists, are trained in collecting and handling samples properly.

Plus, if you discuss the results of an at-home testosterone kit with a medical professional, chances are they’ll want to double-check your levels via a professional test anyway.

While at-home kits can provide a good baseline for starting a conversation with a provider, doctor-administered tests are likely more accurate.

When should I see my doctor about low testosterone?

Testosterone levels must be checked more than once to gain a complete understanding of your levels, according to the Endocrine Society.

Make an appointment with a healthcare professional if your test results show low testosterone or if you’re experiencing symptoms of low T. They’ll probably want to check again using a more reliable method to be sure.

Who should do testosterone testing?

You may need to check your testosterone levels if you’re experiencing any symptoms associated with low T, regardless of your age or sex assigned at birth.

Keeping an eye on your testosterone levels is also important for transgender men and transmasculine people who are using hormone replacement therapy as part of their transition.

Trans folks should check their levels every 3 months for the first year that they’re on HRT and every 6–12 months afterward.

How do I choose the right home testosterone test for me?

There are many different factors that go into choosing an at-home test, such as:

  • Would you rather avoid a finger prick?
  • Do you have a budget?
  • Are you on a time crunch?

You may also want to look at reviews to see if other people have found that certain brands provide better accuracy than others.

Also, certain brands may not be able to deliver results to certain states, so make sure you live in a state where the results of at-home kits can eventually be sent to you.

Does insurance cover at-home testosterone tests?

Health insurance plans don’t generally cover at-home tests. Most insurers prefer that you undergo laboratory testing in a doctor’s office if you have symptoms of low T.

However, you may be able to pay using a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) or Health Savings Account (HSA). You can also check with your insurance provider to see if you’re eligible for reimbursement.

Having low testosterone levels may be a regular part of your aging process. Alternately, you might have a condition that’s causing your levels to drop.

While at-home kits may provide some insight into your levels, the best solution is to work with a healthcare professional that you trust to get an accurate diagnosis and learn about your treatment options.