Highlights for mupirocin

  1. Mupirocin topical ointment is available as a brand-name drug. It’s also available as a generic drug. Brand name: Centany.
  2. Mupirocin comes as an ointment and as a cream you apply to your skin. It also comes as a nasal ointment you apply to the inside of your nose.
  3. Mupirocin topical ointment is used to treat impetigo.

  • Contact warning: Be careful not to get this drug in your eyes. If it comes into contact with your eyes, rinse your eyes well with water. Don’t use this form of the drug inside your nose. It can cause stinging or drying.
  • Allergic reactions warning: If you have an allergic reaction or severe irritation on your skin where you apply the ointment, stop using this drug and call your doctor. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include trouble breathing or swallowing, shortness of breath, swelling of your throat or tongue, itching, or a body rash. Your doctor may give you a different treatment for your infection.
  • Length of treatment warning: Using this drug for a long time can cause microscopic organisms, such as bacteria or fungi, to overgrow. You should only use this drug for as long as your doctor recommends.
  • Antibiotic-associated diarrhea warning: Almost all antibiotics, including mupirocin, can cause diarrhea due to an infection. This infection can cause mild diarrhea or severe inflammation of your colon. Severe reactions can be fatal (cause death). Tell your doctor if you have diarrhea. If you have this infection, you’ll need to stop using mupirocin and get treatment.

Mupirocin is a prescription drug. It comes as a topical ointment, topical cream, and nasal ointment.

Mupirocin topical ointment is available as the brand-name drug Centany. It’s also available as a generic drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version. In some cases, they may not be available in every strength or form as the brand-name drug.

Mupirocin topical ointment may be used as part of a combination therapy. This means you may need to use it with other medications.

Why it’s used

Mupirocin topical ointment is used to treat impetigo. This is a skin infection caused by bacteria.

How it works

Mupirocin belongs to a class of drugs called topical antibacterials. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

Mupirocin works to kill the bacteria that are causing your infection. These include strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. Mupirocin stops the bacteria from multiplying.

Mupirocin topical ointment doesn’t cause drowsiness, but it can cause other side effects.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of mupirocin topical ointment can include:

  • burning, stinging, pain, itching, rash, redness, dryness, tenderness, or swelling of the treated skin
  • nausea
  • increased oozing at the infection site

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Diarrhea that doesn’t go away. The diarrhea may be due to an infection caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which is often called C. difficile or C. diff.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well. To help prevent interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking.

To find out how mupirocin topical ointment might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

This drug comes with several warnings.

Allergy warning

Mupirocin can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:

  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • shortness of breath
  • swelling of your throat or tongue
  • itching
  • body rash
  • chest tightness
  • skin on your face or body that’s pale or flushed (warm and red)
  • a panic attack or feeling that bad things are going to happen

If you develop these symptoms, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Don’t use this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Using it again could be fatal (cause death).

Contact with drug warning

This drug can be transferred to other people if they touch your treated skin. Talk to your doctor about what you should do to prevent this from happening. One way to prevent drug transfer is to cover the treated area with a gauze dressing.

Warnings for other groups

For pregnant women: Mupirocin is a category B pregnancy drug. That means two things:

  1. Studies of the drug in pregnant animals have not shown a risk to the fetus.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in pregnant women to show if the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Talk to your doctor if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant. This drug should be used only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk.

For women who are breastfeeding: It’s not known whether mupirocin passes into breast milk or causes side effects in a child who is breastfed. Talk to your doctor if you breastfeed your child. You may need to decide whether to stop breastfeeding or stop using this medication.