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After a year in quarantine, there’s never been a more apt time to take care of your mental health.

Therapy is an effective way to address a wide range of mental health conditions, including depression and anxiety. Therapy can also help you improve your communication skills, develop strategies to manage stress, and build more self-awareness.

Finding the right therapist can sometimes feel like the biggest challenge. That’s where SonderMind comes in. SonderMind is an online virtual and in-person therapy service that connects licensed therapists with users based on their unique needs.

Read on to learn more about how it works and whether it’s the right fit for you.

SonderMind is a service that connects individuals with licensed mental health professionals.

SonderMind accepts many types of insurance, though anyone can use the service, regardless of insurance status.

While telehealth services are a popular therapy option right now, especially in quarantine, SonderMind offers both video telehealth and in-person therapy options.

Signing up for SonderMind is a simple process that starts with answering questions to match you with a licensed therapist who has experience specific to your needs.

Once you answer the intake questions, you provide contact, insurance, and credit card information. SonderMind will store your credit card in their system to automatically charge for copays and missed sessions. Once you match with a therapist, the final step is to schedule a video or in-person session.

SonderMind works to match users with therapists as quickly as possible, and you can expect to be matched in 24 to 48 hours.

Once you match with your therapist, SonderMind recommends that you talk with them to decide whether you are going to do a virtual or in-person session.

Video telehealth sessions

SonderMind offers video telehealth sessions that are a safe and convenient way to connect with a therapist. Video sessions are a great option if you can’t find therapists near you. And it’s an especially great option during the pandemic.

In-person sessions

One of the things that makes SonderMind unique is its in-person therapy offerings. While many online services connect users with therapists virtually, SonderMind offers the option to connect in person with a therapist near you.

SonderMind is an excellent service for anyone looking to start therapy and get help finding a therapist specific to their unique needs.

This service is also a great option for anyone who wants to explore both virtual video and in-person therapy.

While the research on online therapy is limited, available studies have suggested it provides benefits.

Research from 2016 showed that virtual therapy is as clinically effective as traditional in-person therapy. That same study also indicated that clients were as satisfied with their results from virtual therapy as those who went with in-personal therapy.

A separate small 2016 study found that patients with major depressive disorder who experienced a blended therapy protocol of face-to-face and online sessions reported improvements in depression, health-related quality of life, and anxiety.

A 2018 review also found that both internet-based and traditional treatment can yield a significant reduction in depression symptoms. That being said, researchers of this study concluded that further exploration into the effectiveness of internet-based treatment is needed.

Therapy can be expensive. If you have insurance, you may be able to bring down the cost, though.

SonderMind is in-network with a wide range of insurance networks: Aetna, Anthem (Blue Cross Blue Shield), Apostrophe, Bright Health, Cigna, Friday Health Plans, Kaiser, Optum, and United Healthcare.

Unfortunately, SonderMind therapists are not in-network with Medicare, Medicaid, or Tricare. If you have insurance, you can call the customer service number on the back of your card to confirm your specific benefits and find out how much you’ll pay per session out of pocket.

Without insurance, most therapists charge $75–$150 per session.

Patients can sleep easy knowing that their information is protected through SonderMind. SonderMind uses HIPAA-compliant, encrypted software, and the company states that they follow the highest national standards for security and privacy for all clients and therapists. Video calls are never recorded.

SonderMind is accredited with the Better Business Bureau, and they have an A+ rating.

Overall, reviewers share positive experiences working with SonderMind. People who rate SonderMind positively say that the company was able to match them with a therapist who they liked and continued working with.

However, some reviewers say they had major billing issues, stating that SonderMind was difficult to work with when it came to billing insurance.

There also doesn’t seem to be a stated policy for patient access to medical records.

Additionally, there’s no recourse for customers if there’s a case of negative clinical outcome or patient harm. SonderMind’s Terms of Service states that SonderMind and their affiliates must be held harmless for a variety of claims and liabilities.

One of the first things to ask yourself when embarking on the therapy journey is what kind of communication medium you want, and what kind of therapist you want to work with.

If you’re interested in both video and in-person therapy, and you’re looking for a service that can help identify therapists for you, then SonderMind may be a good fit.

There’s no question that taking care of your mental health is important. However, finding a therapist who you feel comfortable with can be a challenge.

SonderMind is a service that helps connect individuals with licensed professionals, both virtually and in person. Anyone looking for a basic, no frills therapy matching service will find luck with SonderMind.


Lucia Whalen is a Chicago-based writer and multimedia journalist specializing in the intersection of health, science, and environment. She is also a co-founder of Trashy Magazine. Her writing has been featured in Atlas Obscura, South Side Weekly, MindBodyGreen, and other publications. She is a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.