Medigap, or Medicare Supplement insurance, can help to pay for things that original Medicare doesn’t. Medigap has several different plans that you can choose from, two of which are Plan F and Plan G.

Medigap “plans” are different from Medicare “parts,” which are your options for Medicare coverage in general and can include:

So what exactly are Medigap plans F and G? And how do they stack up against each other? Continue reading as we take a deeper dive into these questions.

Medigap is also referred to as Medicare supplement insurance. It can be used to help pay for healthcare costs that aren’t covered by original Medicare (parts A and B).

Medigap is made up of 10 different plans, each designated with a letter. They include Plan A, Plan B, Plan C, Plan D, Plan F, Plan G, Plan K, Plan L, Plan M, and Plan N. Each plan includes a specific set of basic benefits.

Private insurance companies sell Medigap policies. A 2019 study estimated that 25 percent of individuals who had original Medicare had also purchased a Medigap policy.

All Medigap policies must be standardized. That means when you buy a Medigap policy, you must receive the same basic benefits included in the Medigap plan you’ve selected. For example, a Plan G policy that’s sold by Company X must include the same basic set of benefits as a Plan G policy sold by Company Y.

Medigap Plan F is generally considered to be the most inclusive Medigap plan. Like other Medigap plans, you’ll have a monthly premium for Plan F. What this is can depend on the specific policy you’ve purchased.

Most Medigap plans don’t have a deductible. However, in addition to the normal Plan F, you’re also given the option of purchasing a high-deductible policy. The premiums for these plans are lower, but you’ll have to meet a deductible before it begins to cover costs.

If you qualify to purchase Plan F, you can shop for a Plan F policy using Medicare’s search tool. This allows you to compare the different policies that are offered in your area.

Medigap Plan F covers 100 percent of the following costs:

  • Medicare Part A deductible
  • Medicare Part A coinsurance
  • Medicare Part A hospital costs
  • Medicare Part A hospice coinsurance and copay
  • skilled nursing facility coinsurance
  • blood (first three pints)
  • Medicare Part B deductible
  • Medicare Part B coinsurance and copay
  • excess charges associated with Part B

Medigap Plan F also covers 80 percent of emergency care that’s needed when traveling in a foreign country.

The enrollment rules for Plan F have changed for 2020. This change came about because Medigap plans are no longer allowed to cover the Medicare Part B deductible as of January 1st, 2020.

Since Plan F covers the Medicare Part B deductible, it’s been affected by these changes. Because of these new rules, some individuals may not be able to enroll in Plan F.

2020 rules for Medigap Plan f

The new rules for Plan F enrollment are as follows:

  • Plan F isn’t available for purchase for those new to Medicare starting on January 1st, 2020.
  • People already covered by Plan F prior to the 1st of January will be able to keep their plan.
  • Those who were eligible for Medicare before the 1st of January but haven’t purchased a Plan F policy may still be able to do so.

Similarly to Plan F, Medigap Plan G covers a wide variety of costs; however, it does not cover your Medicare Part B deductible.

You have a monthly premium with Plan G, and what you pay can vary depending on the policy you choose. You can compare Plan G policies in your area using Medicare’s search tool.

There’s also a high-deductible option for Plan G. Remember that these plans have lower premiums, but you’ll have to meet the deductible before costs are covered.

Medigap Plan G covers 100 percent of the costs listed below:

  • Medicare Part A deductible
  • Medicare Part A coinsurance
  • Medicare Part A hospital costs
  • Medicare Part A hospice coinsurance and copay
  • skilled nursing facility coinsurance
  • blood (first three pints)
  • Medicare Part B coinsurance and copay
  • excess charges associated with Part B

Like Medigap Plan F, Plan G also covers 80 percent of emergency costs during foreign travel.

Since Plan G does not cover the Medicare Part B deductible, anyone who is enrolled in original Medicare can purchase it. Plan G doesn’t have to follow the same enrollment rules as Plan F. In order to enroll in Plan G, you must have original Medicare parts A and B.

You can first buy a Medigap policy during your Medigap open enrollment period. This is a 6-month span of time that begins the month that you’re 65 or older and after you have enrolled in Medicare Part B.

Some people are eligible for Medicare prior to age 65. However, federal law doesn’t require companies to sell Medigap policies to people under the age of 65.

If you’re under 65, you may not be able to purchase the specific Medigap policy that you want. In some cases, you may not be able to purchase one at all. However, certain states require that companies offer at least one Medigap policy to people under 65.

So how do Plans F and G compare to one another? Overall, they’re very similar.

Both plans offer comparable coverage. The main difference is that Plan F covers the Medicare Part B deductible while Plan G doesn’t.

Both plans also have a high-deductible option. This option includes a deductible of $2,340 that must be met before the policy begins paying for benefits.

Another big difference between Plan F and G is who can enroll. Anyone new to Medicare can enroll in Plan G. This isn’t true for Plan F. Only those already covered and those new to Medicare prior to January 1st, 2020, may enroll.

Check out the tables below for a visual comparison of Plans F and G.

Side-by-side comparison Plans F and G

Benefit covered Plan F Plan G
Medicare Part A deductible 100% 100%
Medicare Part A coinsurance 100% 100%
Medicare Part A hospital costs 100% 100%
Medicare Part A hospice coinsurance and copay 100% 100%
Skilled nursing facility coinsurance 100% 100%
Blood (first 3 pints) 100% 100%
Medicare Part B deductible 100% no coverage
Medicare Part B coinsurance and copay 100% 100%
Excess charges associated with Part B 100% 100%
Foreign travel 80% 80%

You’ll have to pay a monthly premium for your Medigap plan. This is in addition to the monthly premium that you pay for Medicare Part B.

What your monthly premium is can depend on your specific policy. This is why it’s important to compare Medigap policies before deciding on one.

How Medigap premiums are set

Insurance companies can set their Medigap premiums using one of three ways:

  • Community-rated: Everyone with the policy pays the same premium amount regardless of his or her age.
  • Issue-age-rated: Premium amounts are set by the age at which you purchase the policy, with younger buyers receiving lower premiums. The premium amount doesn’t increase as you age.
  • Attained-age rated: The premium amount is set based on your current age. The amount you pay for your premium will increase as you age.

The way a company sets its premiums can impact what you pay. It’s important to note this when you’re comparing different Medigap policies.

Below is a comparison of the cost of Medigap plans F and G using five cities across the United States.

Average range of premiums for Plan F & Plan G

Medigap PlanAverage premium range
Plan F $117.40
–$307.40
Plan G $104.80
–$230.60
Plan G (high deductible)*$26
–$87.75

This is an average premium range for the following cities and zip codes:

*Not every area offers a Plan G high deductible option, but many do.

Medigap is supplemental insurance that helps cover costs that aren’t covered by original Medicare. Medigap Plans F and G are two of the 10 different Medigap plans that you can choose from.

Plans F and G are very similar overall. However, while Plan G is available to anyone new to Medicare, Plan F policies cannot be purchased by those new to Medicare after January 1st, 2020.

All Medigap plans are standardized, so you’re guaranteed to receive the same basic coverage for your policy regardless of the company you purchase it from. However, monthly premiums can vary by policy, so it’s always good to compare multiple policies before you buy.

The information on this website may assist you in making personal decisions about insurance, but it is not intended to provide advice regarding the purchase or use of any insurance or insurance products. Healthline Media does not transact the business of insurance in any manner and is not licensed as an insurance company or producer in any U.S. jurisdiction. Healthline Media does not recommend or endorse any third parties that may transact the business of insurance.

Healthline