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LensDirect is one of the leading online suppliers of contact lenses. They also other eyewear and accessories.

If you’re considering LensDirect, you’re probably curious about what to expect, how they stack up alongside their competitors, and their online reputation. This article will guide you through everything you need to know if you’re ordering contacts or other eyewear through LensDirect.

LensDirect is a direct-to-consumer eyewear company. They’re best known for selling eyeglass lenses and contact lenses. They also sell eyeglass frames, sunglasses, and blue light glasses.

LensDirect also offers lens replacement services for eyeglass frames.

LensDirect sells a wide variety of prescription contact lenses. Bausch and Lomb, Soflens, Acuvue, and PureVision are just some of the brands that they carry.

For prescription eyeglasses, they offer standard clear lenses in addition to several types of premium lens coatings, such as anti-scratch coating and anti-glare. They also carry ultra-thin lenses. You can add blue-light filtering, extra UV-blocking, tinted lenses, progressive, or transition lenses to your prescription order.

They also have lens replacement services for people who want new lenses in existing frames.

LensDirect also offers non-prescription sunglasses, fashion lenses, and readers (nonprescription magnifiers).

While the site says that glasses start at $74, that’s only for frames that don’t include any type of prescription lenses.

Prescription eyeglasses from LensDirect start at around $85 if you choose their most basic lens package and select frames at their lowest price point. This basic lens package does include a water-resistant coating, an anti-scratch coating, and UV protection.

From there, your price will depend on what lens upgrades you choose. For example, a smudge-resistant set of lenses with blue-light protection (which LensDirect touts as their most popular option) will add $75 to your price. If you choose the thinnest lenses available in addition to that blue-light-filtering and smudge-proof coating, your price will raise to over $230 before tax.

If you aren’t in a huge hurry to order, you can also give LensDirect your email address and wait for a coupon or a special deal, which they run often.

The good news is, you don’t have to calculate shipping in the price. Shipping over $49 is free, and no eyeglasses from LensDirect will cost you less than that.

When you’re shopping for glasses from LensDirect on their website, it all starts with choosing your frame. You can even use your device’s camera to access their virtual try-on tool, which will show you how different frames will look on your face.

Once you’ve chosen your frames, you’ll be asked to select whether you need glasses for distance (for nearsightedness) or glasses for reading (for farsightedness).

The next few selection screens will offer you different lens options, from lenses that are premium grade and super-thin to lenses that are meant for nighttime use. Each of these lens upgrades will add to the price of your glasses.

The website is pretty easy to navigate on mobile or on desktop, and it keeps track of your total price until you’re finished building your selection, and have added it to your cart.

If you’re ordering a prescription pair of eyeglasses, you’ll need your prescription information before you place your order.

You can upload a photo of your prescription, or you can enter the information online.

How to order from LensDirect

Before you order from LensDirect, search their website for promo codes or special deals.

Next, you can filter through different types of frame shapes, styles, and colors.

After you’ve selected a frame, choose the lens type and any upgrades, if you want them. It’s best to have a general idea of the upgrades that you’d like before you finish your order, so you don’t pay for more than you need.

Finally, you’ll enter your prescription information and pay for your order.

If you’re submitting your optical care purchase to your insurance to get a reimbursement, print and keep a copy of your email receipt.

Order prescription and nonprescription eyewear at LensDirect online.

If you choose the “free” or standard USPS shipping option, you should get your glasses within 6 business days, if not sooner.

To get them faster, you’ll need to pay for shipping. To get your glasses in 1-3 days, you’ll need to pay $30 extra.

Your order won’t ship until you provide your prescription information, so keep it on hand to avoid delays.

LensDirect has a 4.4 rating on review aggregator Trustpilot. Considering there are over 4,000 reviews, that’s considered excellent.

LensDirect’s Better Business Bureau (BBB) listing tells a very different story. LensDirect only has 1 out of 5 stars based on a handful of customer reviews on their BBB listing. However, it does look like every customer complaint on that website has been resolved. Also, people tend to use BBB to lodge complaints, not necessarily to leave positive reviews about their experience with a retailer. The BBB has given LensDirect a B rating.

Most negative reviews about LensDirect online refer to lost orders or lens replacement in existing frames. There are some instances where it appears a customer’s order was lost and communication could have been quicker to resolve the situation.

LensDirect is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to eyewear options. Competitors to LensDirect that offer similar services include:

If you see a pair of frames that are exclusive to LensDirect that you absolutely love, buying eyeglasses from them is probably worth it.

LensDirect is also a good option if you can’t do without a variety of premium lens upgrade options, blue light filters, thinner lenses that are impact-resistant, or if you don’t care about price.

LensDirect’s specialty really is the lenses, so in that sense, you get what you pay for. You also might want to wait for a good deal or a coupon to get the price lower.


Kathryn Watson is a freelance writer covering everything from sleep hygiene to moral philosophy. Her recent bylines include Healthline, Christianity Today, LitHub, and Curbed. She lives in New York City with her husband and two children, and her website is kathrynswatson.com.