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This Instagram Star Won’t Be Shamed for Having a C-Section

Chontel Duncan clapped back at the negative comments about her cesarean delivery, reminding us all that childbirth is always tough — and rewarding.

 

chontel duncan
Image Source: @chontelduncan

Australian model Chontel Duncan is best known for her awe-inspiring abs and the popular fitness and lifestyle tips she shares on her Instagram account. But she’s also never afraid to open up about important issues.

This time, the 28-year-old mother of two is getting real about C-sections, today referred to as cesarean deliveries, and the stigma attached to them.

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After giving birth to her second child, Swayde — via cesarean delivery — Duncan wrote that she had been harassed by online commenters suggesting she’d taken the easy way out by opting for a caesarian rather than natural birth.

“I’ll catch the trolls before they give me their two cents because I didn’t push my baby out which was (mind you) out of my control,” she wrote in one post.

I’ll catch the trolls before they give me their two cents because I didn’t push my baby out which was (mind you) out of my control. There’s nothing easy about a cesarean either....the tugging, the pushing, the sounds, the smells, the feeling of no control, the fear of something going wrong, the recovery it all terrifies me. But I would do it all again in a heart beat... The top photo captures me at my weakest point and my husband incredibly helpless, the middle photo captures the sound of Swayde’s cry & visual of his privates and bottom photo captured the most incredible feeling of all, two parents falling in love at first sight. No matter how we birth or how our babies come into our lives we all experience fear, excitement and fall in love. Natural, caesarean, surrogate, adoption what ever the situation we all go through the journey in some way shape or form & we all should be dam proud of ourselves. @sam_hiitaustralia

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“There’s nothing easy about a cesarean either....the tugging, the pushing, the sounds, the smells, the feeling of no control, the fear of something going wrong, the recovery it all terrifies me,” she continued.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cesareans make up 32 percent of all deliveries in the United States. And for most mothers, the decision to undergo the procedure is often out of their control. Indeed, cesareans are most often performed when there are complications during normal labor.

Such was the case with Duncan’s first pregnancy. And when it came to delivering her second baby, Swayde, a cesarean was planned due to the position of the baby in the womb, she told CafeMom.

That’s just one of many reasons why a cesarean could be performed. Others include when the baby has developmental conditions, their head is too big for the birth canal, a breech birth, or when the mother is having health problems herself. This is why it’s important not to judge how a mother delivers her baby. Because regardless of whether she opts for vaginal birth or cesarean delivery — or whether the decision was even hers to begin with — the goal is the same: a gorgeous, healthy baby.

For Duncan, a cesarean was the best option for her and her child. The photos she shared of Swayde’s birth show all the emotions any mother goes through during birth — natural or not — the worry, excitement, and joy of bringing a new life into the world.

“No matter how we birth or how our babies come into our lives we all experience fear, excitement and fall in love,” she writes. “Natural, caesarean, surrogate, adoption whatever the situation we all go through the journey in some way shape or form & we all should be dam [sic] proud of ourselves.”

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Allison Krupp

Allison Krupp is an American writer, editor, and ghostwriting novelist. Between wild, multi-continental adventures, she resides in Berlin, Germany. Check out her website here.

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