Green vaginal discharge is typically considered a sign of infection. When you’re pregnant, extra caution is the rule, so if you’re pregnant and have green discharge, see your doctor right away.

The green discharge could be the sign of an infection that could cause serious complications for your pregnancy.

Common causes of green vaginal mucus include:

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted bacterium in the United States.

Symptoms

Most women, including pregnant women, do not have symptoms with a chlamydial infection. For those women who do have symptoms, they may include:

Can chlamydia impact my pregnancy?

Untreated chlamydia in pregnant women has been associated with:

Testing for chlamydia

During your first prenatal visit, your doctor should screen you for chlamydia. Your doctor will most likely screen you again during your third trimester if:

  • you are under 25
  • have a new sex partner
  • have more than one sex partner
  • have a sex partner with more than one sex partner
  • have a sex partner with an STD (sexually transmitted disease)

If the tests indicate that you have a chlamydial infection, you should be retested at three weeks and three months following completion of treatment.

Treating chlamydia

Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics, such as azithromycin or doxycycline.

Gonorrhea is an STD that is most common in young adults. It is sometimes referred to as the clap.

Symptoms

Most women, including pregnant women, do not know that they have gonorrhea because they have no symptoms. For those women with symptoms, they are often mild and mistaken for a vaginal or bladder infection. For some, symptoms include:

Can gonorrhea impact my pregnancy?

If you have gonorrhea, during delivery, you can give the infection to your baby. Health problems for babies that contract gonorrhea from their mothers may include:

Testing for gonorrhea

During your first prenatal visit, your doctor will typically screen you for gonorrhea if you are in a high risk category. If you are at continued high risk, your doctor will most likely screen you again during your third trimester. Risk factors include:

  • being under 25
  • having a previous or coexisting STD
  • living in a high-morbidity area
  • having a new sex partner
  • having more than one sex partner
  • exchanging sex for money or drugs

Treating gonorrhea

Typically, your doctor will prescribe two drugs, such as ceftriaxone and azithromycin to take concurrently (dual therapy).

According to the CDC, treating gonorrhea is becoming increasingly difficult with growing antimicrobial resistance in the bacteria. If symptoms persist following treatment, see your doctor for reevaluation.

Trichomoniasis, sometimes referred to as trich, is a common STD caused by infection by the Trichomonas vaginalis parasite. According to the CDC, an estimated 3.7 million people in the United States have the infection.

Symptoms

Because most women, including pregnant women, with the parasite do not have symptoms, they cannot tell that they are infected.

For those women with symptoms, they are often mild and mistaken for a vaginal or bladder infection. For some, symptoms may include:

Can trichomoniasis impact my pregnancy?

If you are pregnant and have trichomoniasis, you are more likely to:

Testing for trichomoniasis

Your doctor’s diagnosis of trichomoniasis can be confirmed by viewing a sample of vaginal fluid under a microscope.

According to the Mayo Clinic, while traditionally growing a culture has been used to diagnose trichomoniasis, that is being replaced by faster tests such as nucleic acid amplification and rapid antigen tests.

Risk factors for trichomoniasis include:

  • having had more than one sex partner
  • having had trichomoniasis previously
  • having a history of STDs
  • having sex without a condom

Treating trichomoniasis

Your doctor will typically prescribe either tinidazole (Tindamax) or metronidazole (Flagyl). Once you have been treated for trichomoniasis, you can get it again. According to the CDC, about 20 percent of people receiving the treatment get infected again within 3 months.

If you are pregnant and have green vaginal discharge, make an appointment to see your doctor. Green discharge could indicate an infection, such as:

  • chlamydia
  • gonorrhea
  • trichomoniasis

Infections such as these have the potential to cause serious complications for your health and your pregnancy. Your healthcare provider will be able to get you started on medications right away to treat the infection.