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Treadmills have long been a favorite among fitness enthusiasts looking for a convenient way to boost their cardio performance from home.

However, many treadmills are quite large, making them a poor fit if you’re tight on space.

That’s where the Echelon Stride comes in.

The Stride boasts auto-folding technology and a lightweight design, making it easy to stow away when it’s not in use.

This article reviews the pros, cons, and key features of the Echelon Stride to help you decide if it’s the right folding treadmill for you.

Echelon is a fitness brand that is known for producing gym-quality cardio machines, including bikes, rowers, and the Reflect Smart Fitness Mirror.

The Stride is the first and only treadmill from Echelon.

It stands out from others on the market thanks to its auto-folding technology, which makes storing the machine a breeze.

The Stride arrives mostly assembled, with just the smartphone holder, safety lanyard, and power cord packaged separately.

To get started, simply unfold the treadmill, attach the power cord, and turn on the machine.

The Stride can be used as a basic treadmill, with eight built-in workouts and manual incline and speed adjustments.

However, with an Echelon United membership, you can also connect to the Echelon Fit app for trainer-led workouts and performance tracking.

Just keep in mind that the Stride doesn’t include a touch screen. Instead, you’ll need a tablet or smartphone for streaming classes

How to connect to the Echelon Fit app

In addition to treadmill workouts, the Echelon Fit app also provides access to a large library of live and on-demand classes, including yoga, strength training, kickboxing, and Pilates.

You can also track your progress over time, compete on live leaderboards, and earn badges for various accomplishments, such as completing a certain number of workouts each week.

To connect your device, start by setting up your account online and downloading the Echelon Fit app on your smartphone or tablet.

Next, connect your treadmill by clicking “Select Equipment” in the app and following the prompts on the screen.

Using the machine

The Stride doesn’t include a touch screen. Instead, it’s equipped with a digital touch console, which shows your time, incline, speed, altitude, steps, and heart rate.

When streaming classes, your tablet will cover part of the display. However, if you’re using the Echelon Fit app, you can view your stats on your device instead.

One thing to keep in mind is that, unlike many other smart treadmills, the Stride doesn’t offer trainer-controlled incline and speed adjustments during classes.

Instead, speed and incline adjustments must be made manually using either the up and down arrows on the handlebars or the quick buttons on the digital display.

How to fold the treadmill

One of the main advantages of the Echelon Stride is how easy it is to fold and stow away.

Here’s how to fold the treadmill:

  1. Fold the tablet holder down so that it’s parallel with the handlebars.
  2. Press the release lever under the handlebars and pull up to lower the center display.
  3. Finally, press the red lever on the left side of the running deck to engage the automatic folding mechanism.

Additionally, as it weighs just 156 pounds (70.8 kg) and features transport wheels, the Stride can be easily leaned up against a wall or rolled into a storage closet.

The standout feature of the Echelon Stride treadmill is its auto-folding technology, which folds the machine to just over 10 inches (25.4 cm) deep.

It also boasts plenty of training features as well, including speeds of up to 12 miles per hour (19.3 kilometers per hour) and 12 levels of incline that max out at 10%.

You can also change your speed and incline using buttons on either the digital display or handlebars.

Speaking of which, the handlebars also include heart rate sensors, though you can also pair your own Bluetooth-enabled heart rate monitor to the Echelon Fit app.

The center console features an adjustable digital display and a device holder for streaming classes on your smartphone or tablet.

Other notable features include two cup holders — one of which can be converted to a smartphone holder — and a safety stop lanyard, which can be clipped onto your clothes while running and pulled quickly to automatically stop the machine.

The Echelon Stride is lighter and smaller than many similar treadmills on the market. However, it also has a less-powerful motor, offering just 1.75 horsepower (HP).

Another thing to note is the running deck is a bit short and isn’t ideal for runners over 6 feet (183 cm) tall.

Still, for those under 6 feet (183 cm) tall, the Stride is a great option for runners, as its frame-balanced elastomer and cushioned deck help absorb impact to protect your joints.

The Echelon Stride treadmill retails for $1,299.

When purchasing the treadmill, you’re required to sign up for an Echelon United membership, though you can cancel it later on.

There are three membership plans to choose from, and depending on which plan you choose, shipping is either free or costs an additional $200.

Here are the current subscription options:

  • $39.99 per month, plus $199.99 for shipping
  • $399 per year, plus free shipping
  • $699 every 2 years, plus free shipping

To help make the machine more affordable, Echelon offers special financing options for qualified customers.

Echelon also offers a 30-day risk-free return policy if you purchase the Stride from their website.

Finally, the included warranty is quite short, only covering the treadmill for up to 1 year.

Based on customer reviews, there’s no doubt that the Echelon Stride is an excellent treadmill option for small spaces, thanks to its compact design and unique folding mechanism — though, some feel that it’s a bit too heavy to be stored vertically.

Customers also agree that while the display is pretty simplistic, it’s well-lit and easy to read.

What’s more, most reviewers are satisfied with the variety of classes offered by the Echelon Fit app.

One of the biggest downsides mentioned is the relatively small running surface, which measures 5 inches (12.7 cm) shorter and 2 inches (5.1 cm) narrower than comparable treadmills.

This is particularly troublesome for taller runners who may have to shorten their natural stride.

Finally, several reviewers note disappointment in the training options.

While some wish for a decline option, others complain that the incline maxes out at 10%, compared with 15% offered by similar treadmills.

Here’s how the Echelon Stride treadmill compares with some of its competitors:

Echelon StrideNordicTrack Commercial 1750Sole Fitness F80
Price$1,299$1,799$2,799
App subscription cost$300 annual fee is required for the first yearfree iFit family membership for the first year; $396 per year thereafternone
Warranty1-year
• 1-year frame
• 2-year parts
• 1-year labor
• 5-year electronics and parts
• 2-year labor
• lifetime motor and frame
Dimensions69.3 × 31 × 49.2 inches
(176 × 78.7 × 125 cm)
81.3 × 39.3 × 62.8 inches
(206.5 × 99.8 × 159.5 cm)
82 × 37 × 66 inches
(208.3 × 94 × 167.6 cm)
Folded dimensions
69.3 × 31 × 10.3 inches
(176 × 78.7 × 26 cm)
37.3 × 39.3 × 75.8 inches
(94.7 × 99.8 × 192.5 cm)
48 × 37 × 72 inches
(121.9 × 94 × 182.9 cm)
Running surface55 × 20 inches
(138.7 × 50.8 cm)
60 × 22 inches
(152.4 × 55.9 cm)
60 × 22 inches
(152.4 × 55.9 cm)
Weight156 lbs (70.8 kg)310 lbs (140.6 kg)278 lbs (126 kg)
Max user weight300 lbs (136 kg)300 lbs (136 kg)375 lbs (170 kg)
Motor1.75 HP3.75 HP3.5 HP
Trainer-led classesyesyesno
Displaydigital 10-inch (25.4-cm) touch screenLCD
Incline0–10%-3–15%0–15%
Max speed12 mph (19.3 kph)12 mph (19.3 kph)12 mph (19.3 kph)

The Echelon Stride is the lightest, most compact, and least expensive of the three options.

However, it also offers the smallest running deck, the least powerful motor, and the lowest max incline.

What’s more, once you add the cost of a yearly Echelon United membership, the Stride isn’t that much cheaper than the NordicTrack Commercial 1750.

Another area where the NordicTrack shines is the inclusion of an HD touch screen for streaming classes.

Meanwhile, the Sole Fitness 80 is the most expensive, though it doesn’t have the added cost of an app membership. It also offers a lifetime warranty on the frame and motor, as well as up to a 15% incline.

However, when it comes to ease of folding, the Stride is hard to beat as it’s the only option that folds automatically and can be stored vertically or under your bed.

With a variety of workout options, both on and off the treadmill, the Echelon Stride suits runners of varying fitness levels.

What’s more, its automatic folding technology and compact size make it ideal if you’re tight on space.

With that said, there are several downsides to consider.

In addition to its smaller running deck, the Stride is also less powerful and has a shorter warranty than its competitors.

Furthermore, when you include the price of a yearly Echelon United membership, the treadmill isn’t that much cheaper than the NordicTrack Commercial 1750, which includes a free 1-year subscription to iFit, has more training options, and comes equipped with an HD touch screen.

Overall, the NordicTrack Commercial 1750 offers the best value, though the Sole 80 is also worth considering if you don’t want the added cost of an app subscription.

However, if your main priority is finding an option that is compact and folds easily, then the Stride is worth considering.

If you value being able to store your treadmill under your bed or in a closet, then the Echelon Stride might just be your perfect fit.

With 8 built-in workouts, speeds of up to 12 mph (19.3 kph), and 0–10% incline, the Stride offers a challenging workout regardless of your fitness level.

Using your own device, you can also connect to the Echelon Fit app to stream live and on-demand classes, though you’ll need an Echelon United membership to do so.

While the smaller size of the Echelon Stride may be a pro for some, the treadmill’s short running deck may be too small for taller individuals to use comfortably.

Furthermore, serious runners may find the treadmill to be limited in terms of power and incline.

Overall, while the Stride is ideal if you’re tight on space, it’s worth considering spending a little bit more on a treadmill that offers more bang for your buck.