Highlights for etanercept

  1. Etanercept injectable solution is available as brand-name drugs. It’s not available as a generic drug. Brand names: Enbrel, Erelzi.
  2. Etanercept comes only in the form of an injectable solution. It comes in a single-use prefilled syringe, a single-use prefilled pen, a multiple-use vial, an auto-injector, and a single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with a reusable auto-injector.
  3. Etanercept injectable solution is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and plaque psoriasis.

Important warnings

FDA warnings

  • This drug has black box warnings. These are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Black box warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.
  • Risk of infection warning: This drug can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Some people develop serious infections while taking this drug. These include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria. Some people have died from these infections. Your doctor may test you for TB before starting this drug. They may monitor you closely for symptoms of TB during treatment, even if you tested negative for TB. Your doctor may check you for symptoms of any type of infection before, during, and after your treatment with this drug. Don’t start taking this drug if you have any kind of infection unless your doctor says it’s okay.
  • Risk of cancer warning: There have been cases of unusual cancers in people who started using this type of medication when they were younger than 18 years. This drug may increase the risk of lymphoma or other cancers. People with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, especially those with very active disease, may be more likely to get lymphoma.

Other warnings

What is etanercept?

Etanercept is a prescription medication. It’s self-injectable and comes in five injected forms: a single-use prefilled syringe, a single-use prefilled pen, a multiple-use vial, an auto-injector, and a single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with a reusable auto-injector.

Etanercept injectable solution is available as the brand-name drugs Enbrel and Erelzi (Erelzi is a biosimilar*). Etanercept is not available as a generic drug.

Etanercept injectable solution may be used as part of a combination therapy. That means you may need to take it with other drugs.

* A biosimilar is a type of biologic drug. Biologics are made from a biological source, such as living cells. A biosimilar is similar to a brand-name biologic drug, but it’s not an exact copy. (A generic drug, on the other hand, is an exact copy of a drug made from chemicals. Most drugs are made from chemicals.)

A biosimilar may be prescribed to treat some or all of the conditions the brand-name drug treats and is expected to have the same effects on a patient. In this case, Erelzi is a biosimilar version of Enbrel.

Why it’s used

Etanercept injectable solution is used to treat:

Enbrel is used to treat all of these conditions. However, Erelzi is only used to treat RA, JIA, and AS.

How it works

Etanercept injectable solution belongs to a class of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

TNF is normally found in your body and causes inflammation. However, certain diseases can cause your body to make too much TNF. This can result in too much inflammation, which can be harmful. Etanercept works to lower the levels of TNF in your body, which helps to control excess inflammation.

Etanercept side effects

Etanercept injectable solution doesn’t cause drowsiness, but it can cause other side effects.

More common side effects

The more common side effects that can occur with etanercept include:

If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Infections. Symptoms can include:
    • cough that doesn’t go away
    • fever
    • unexplained weight loss
    • sweats or chills
    • blood in your phlegm
    • pain or burning with urination
    • diarrhea or stomach pain
    • skin sores or red, painful areas on your skin
    • loss of body fat and muscle
  • Hepatitis B infection. Symptoms can include:
    • muscle aches
    • clay-colored stools
    • feeling very tired
    • fever
    • dark urine
    • chills
    • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes
    • stomach pain
    • little or no appetite
    • skin rash
    • vomiting
  • Nervous system problems. Symptoms can include:
    • numbness or tingling in any part of your body
    • vision changes
    • weakness in your arms and legs
    • dizziness
  • Blood problems. Symptoms can include:
    • fever
    • bruising or bleeding very easily
    • looking pale
  • Heart failure. Symptoms can include:
    • shortness of breath
    • swelling of your lower legs or feet
    • sudden weight gain
  • Psoriasis. Symptoms can include:
    • red, scaly patches on your skin
    • raised bumps that may be filled with pus
  • Allergic reactions. Symptoms can include:
    • severe rash
    • swollen face
    • trouble breathing
  • Lupus-like syndrome. Symptoms can include:
    • rash on your face and arms that gets worse in the sun
  • Liver problems. Symptoms can include:
    • excessive tiredness
    • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes
    • poor appetite or vomiting
    • pain on the right side of your abdomen

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.

Injection site reactions

  • Injection site reactions are common after an injected dose. However, you should call your doctor right away if you have an injection site reaction that doesn’t go away within a few days or gets worse.

Etanercept may interact with other medications

Etanercept injectable solution can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Examples of drugs that can cause interactions with etanercept are listed below.

Biologic drugs

These drugs are created from natural sources. They may include vaccines, gene therapy, and blood components. Etanercept is a biologic drug. You may have a higher risk of getting a serious infection if you take etanercept with other biologics. Examples of other biologics include:

  • abatacept
  • anakinra
  • rilonacept

Live vaccines

Don’t receive a live vaccine while taking etanercept. The vaccine may not fully protect you from disease while you’re taking etanercept. Examples of live vaccines include:

  • nasal spray flu vaccine
  • measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine
  • chickenpox vaccine

Cancer drug

Don’t take cyclophosphamide while using etanercept. Taking these drugs together may increase your risk of certain types of cancers.

Ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis drug

Taking sulfasalazine with etanercept may cause a decrease in your white blood cell count. Tell your doctor if you’re currently taking sulfasalazine or have taken it recently.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

Etanercept warnings

This drug comes with several warnings.

Allergy warning

This drug can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your throat or tongue
  • hives

If you develop these symptoms, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal (cause death).

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to rubber or latex. The inner needle cover on the prefilled syringe and the needle cap on prefilled auto-injectors contain latex. Don’t handle the needle if you’re allergic.

Warnings for people with certain health conditions

For people with infections: Tell your doctor if you have any kind of infection. This includes small infections, such as an open cut or sore, or an infection that’s in your whole body, such as the flu. If you have an infection when taking etanercept, you may have a higher risk of serious side effects.

For people with tuberculosis: If you previously had a tuberculosis (TB) infection treated, your TB infection could come back while you’re taking this medication. Be sure to contact your doctor right away if the symptoms you had during your TB infection return.

For people with hepatitis B virus infection: If you carry the hepatitis B virus, it can become active while you use etanercept and damage your liver. Your doctor may do blood tests before you start treatment, while you’re using this drug, and for several months after you stop using this drug.

For people with nervous system problems: This drug can worsen symptoms of some nervous system problems. Use this drug with caution if you have:

  • transverse myelitis
  • optic neuritis
  • multiple sclerosis
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome

For people with heart failure: This medication can make heart failure worse. Call your doctor right away if you have symptoms of worsening heart failure. These symptoms include shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain.

For people with diabetes: This medication may affect your body’s ability to control blood sugar. If you’re taking etanercept with diabetes medications, your doctor may adjust your diabetes medications. Tell your doctor if you have diabetes.

For people with latex allergy: Tell your doctor if you are allergic to rubber or latex. The inner needle cover on the prefilled syringe and the needle cap on the prefilled auto-injectors contain latex. Don’t handle the needle cover if you’re allergic to latex.

Warnings for other groups

For pregnant women: Studies of the drug in pregnant animals have not shown risk to the fetus. However, some studies in humans have shown a slightly increased risk to a fetus when a pregnant woman takes this drug.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk.

For women who are breastfeeding: Data suggests this medication is present in low amounts in human milk and can be passed to a breastfed child. You and your doctor may need to decide whether you’ll take this drug or breastfeed.

For seniors: If you’re over the age of 65 years, you may be at higher risk for a serious infection or certain types of cancers while taking this drug.

For children: This drug hasn’t been studied in children younger than 2 years with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It also hasn’t been studied in children younger than 4 years with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

When to call the doctor

  • During your treatment with this drug, call your doctor right away if you have an infection, a history of infections that keep coming back, or other problems that can increase your risk of infections
  • Also call your doctor if you are scheduled to receive any vaccines. People using this drug shouldn’t receive live vaccines.

How to take etanercept

All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dose, form, and how often you take it will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

Dosage for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

Brand: Enbrel

  • Form: single-use prefilled syringe
  • Strengths:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
    • 25 mg: 0.51 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: SureClick auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with AutoTouch reusable auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: multiple-dose vial
  • Strength: 25 mg

Brand: Erelzi

  • Form: Single-dose prefilled syringe
  • Strength: 25 mg/0.5 mL solution, 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Single-dose prefilled Sensoready Pen
  • Strength: 50 mg/mL solution

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older)

  • Typical dosage: 50 mg once per week.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

This drug is not prescribed for this age group for this condition.

Dosage for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

Brand: Enbrel

  • Form: single-use prefilled syringe
  • Strengths:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
    • 25 mg: 0.51 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: SureClick auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with AutoTouch reusable auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: multiple-dose vial
  • Strength: 25 mg

Brand: Erelzi

  • Form: Single-dose prefilled syringe
  • Strength: 25 mg/0.5 mL solution, 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Single-dose prefilled Sensoready Pen
  • Strength: 50 mg/mL solution

Child dosage (ages 2–17 years)

The dosage is based on your child’s weight.

  • Typical dosage for children who weigh 138 pounds or more: 50 mg once per week.
  • For children who weigh less than 138 pounds:
  • Enbrel: 0.8 mg per 2.2 pounds of bodyweight once per week.
  • Erelzi: No dosage form is available for children who weigh less than 138 pounds.

Child dosage (ages 0–1 year)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Dosage for psoriatic arthritis (PsA)

Brand: Enbrel

  • Form: single-use prefilled syringe
  • Strengths:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
    • 25 mg: 0.51 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: SureClick auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with AutoTouch reusable auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: multiple-dose vial
  • Strength: 25 mg

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older)

  • Typical dosage: 50 mg once per week.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Dosage for ankylosing spondylitis (AS)

Brand: Enbrel

  • Form: single-use prefilled syringe
  • Strengths:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
    • 25 mg: 0.51 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: SureClick auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with AutoTouch reusable auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: multiple-dose vial
  • Strength: 25 mg

Brand: Erelzi

  • Form: Single-dose prefilled syringe
  • Strength: 25 mg/0.5 mL solution, 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Single-dose prefilled Sensoready Pen
  • Strength: 50 mg/mL solution

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older)

  • Typical dosage: 50 mg once per week.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Dosage for plaque psoriasis

Brand: Enbrel

  • Form: single-use prefilled syringe
  • Strengths:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
    • 25 mg: 0.51 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: SureClick auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with AutoTouch reusable auto-injector
  • Strength:
    • 50 mg: 0.98 mL of a 50 mg/mL solution
  • Form: multiple-dose vial
  • Strength: 25 mg

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older)

  • Typical starting dosage: 50 mg taken twice per week for 3 months.
  • Typical maintenance dosage: 50 mg once per week.

Child dosage (ages 4–17 years)

The dosage is based on your child’s weight.

  • Typical dosage for children who weigh 138 pounds or more: 50 mg once per week.
  • For children who weigh less than 138 pounds: 0.8 mg per 2.2 pounds of bodyweight once per week.

Child dosage (ages 0–3 years)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.

Take as directed

Etanercept injectable solution is used for long-term treatment. It comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If you don't take it all: Your condition won’t improve and it could get worse.

If you stop taking it: Your condition may get worse if you stop taking etanercept.

If you take too much: If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

What to do if you miss a dose: This medication is used once a week. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. Never try to catch up by giving two injections at the same time. This could result in dangerous side effects. If you’re not sure when to take your next dose, call your doctor.

How to tell if the drug is working: For arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: You should have less joint pain and be able to move better.

For plaque psoriasis: Your skin lesions should be smaller and your skin should improve.

Important considerations for taking etanercept

Keep these considerations in mind if your doctor prescribes etanercept for you.

General

  • Take this drug once a week.

Self-management

If your healthcare provider decides that you or a caregiver can give your injections at home, you or your caregiver should receive training on the right way to do the injection. Don’t try to inject this drug until you’ve been shown the right way to give the injections by your healthcare provider.

There are five ways to administer this drug. Your doctor or nurse will tell you which one you’re using and show you how to give it. Here are some tips for preparing to use the different types of injections:

Single-use prefilled syringe

For Enbrel:

  • Gather your alcohol swab, a cotton ball or gauze, an adhesive bandage, and a safe needle disposal container.
  • Carefully take the prefilled syringe out of the box. Be sure to avoid shaking it.
  • Don’t use the syringe if the needle cover is missing. If it’s missing, return the syringe to your pharmacy.
  • Leave the syringe at room temperature for about 15–30 minutes before injecting. Don’t warm it up any other way.
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water.
  • Hold the syringe with the covered needle pointing down. If you see bubbles in it, very gently tap the syringe so the bubbles rise to the top.
  • Turn the syringe so the purple horizontal lines on the barrel are facing you. Check to see if the amount of liquid in the syringe falls between the purple lines. The top of the liquid might be curved. If the liquid isn’t in that range, don’t use the syringe.
  • Make sure the solution in the syringe is clear and colorless. White particles are okay. Don’t use the solution if it’s cloudy or discolored.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your Enbrel syringe.

For Erelzi:

Warning: The needle cap on the prefilled syringe contains latex. Don’t handle the syringe if you’re sensitive to latex.

  • Gather your alcohol swab, a cotton ball or gauze, an adhesive bandage, and a safe needle disposal container.
  • Carefully take the prefilled syringe out of the box. Be sure to avoid shaking it.
  • Don’t remove the needle cap until just before you give the injection.
  • The syringe has a needle guard that will be activated to cover the needle after the injection is given. Don’t touch the “wings” on the needle guard before use. Touching them may cause the needle guard to be activated too early.
  • Don’t use the syringe if the blister tray is broken. Also, don’t use the syringe if it’s broken or the needle guard is activated. In case of these problems, return the syringe to your pharmacy.
  • Leave the syringe at room temperature for about 15–30 minutes before injecting. Don’t warm it up any other way.
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water.
  • Make sure the solution in the syringe is clear, and colorless to slightly yellow. Small white particles are okay. Don’t use the solution if it’s cloudy or discolored, or contains large lumps or flakes. In case of these problems, return the syringe to your pharmacy.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your Erelzi syringe.

Single-use prefilled pen:

Warning: The needle cover inside the cap of the pen contains latex. Don’t handle the pen if you’re sensitive to latex.

  • Carefully take the prefilled pen out of the box. Be sure to avoid shaking it.
  • Don’t use the pen if you drop it with the cap removed, or if the pen looks damaged after you drop it.
  • Leave the pen at room temperature for about 15–30 minutes before injecting. Don’t warm it up any other way.
  • Gather your alcohol swab, a cotton ball or gauze, an adhesive bandage, and a safe needle disposal container.
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water.
  • Make sure the solution in the prefilled pen is clear and colorless to slightly yellow. White particles are okay. Don’t use the solution if it’s cloudy, discolored, or has large lumps, flakes, or particles in it.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your Erelzi pen.
  • When you’ve finished your injection, the window in the pen will turn green. If the window has not turned green after you remove the pen, or if it looks like the medication is still injecting, you have not received a full dose. Call your doctor right away.

SureClick auto-injector:

  • Remove one auto-injector from the carton. Be sure to avoid shaking it.
  • If you drop it onto a hard surface, don’t use it. Use a new one instead.
  • Do NOT use the auto-injector if the white needle cap is missing or not securely attached.
  • Look at this drug through the inspection window. It should be clear and colorless, or it may have small white particles. Don’t use it if it looks cloudy, discolored, or has large lumps, flakes, or colored particles.
  • Leave the auto-injector at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before injecting. Don’t warm it up any other way. Leave the white cap on during this time.
  • Wash your hands well.
  • Don’t remove the white needle cap from the auto-injector until you’re ready to inject.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your SureClick auto-injector.
  • When you’ve finished your injection, the window in the auto-injector will turn yellow. After you remove the auto-injector, if the window has not turned yellow or if it looks like the drug is still injecting, you have not received a full dose. If this happens, you should call your doctor right away.

Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge for use with reusable AutoTouch auto-injector

  • If you drop your auto-injector onto a hard surface, don’t use it. Don’t use it if any part appears cracked or broken. Call your doctor to find out how to get a new auto-injector.
  • Don’t remove the purple cap from the cartridge before inserting it into the auto-injector. Don’t use the cartridge if the purple needle cap is missing or not securely attached, and don’t re-use or recap a cartridge.
  • Leave the cartridge at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before injecting. Don’t warm it up any other way. Leave the purple cap on during this time.
  • Wash your hands well.
  • Hold the cartridge with the labeled side facing out and slide it into the door of the auto-injector. Close the door and remove the purple cap.
  • Look at this drug through the inspection window. It should be clear and colorless, or it may have small white particles. Don’t use it if it looks cloudy, discolored, or has large lumps, flakes, or colored particles.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your auto-injector.

Multiple-use vials:

  • Check to make sure the dose tray has these five items:
    • one prefilled diluent syringe containing 1 mL of diluent (liquid) with attached adapter and twist-off cap
    • one plunger
    • one 27-gauge 1/2-inch needle in a hard plastic cover
    • one vial adapter
    • one etanercept vial
  • Leave the dose tray at room temperature for about 15–30 minutes before injecting.
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water.
  • Peel the paper seal off the dose tray and remove all the items.
  • Inspect the volume of liquid in the syringe with the twist-off cap pointing down. Use the unit markings on the side of the syringe to make sure there’s at least 1 mL of liquid in the syringe. If the level of liquid is below the 1 mL mark, don’t use it.
  • Don’t use it if the twist-off cap is missing or not securely attached.
  • Follow the instructions for injecting that your doctor gave you, or that came with your multiple-use vials.

Storage

For Enbrel products:

  • Store this drug in the refrigerator. Keep it at a temperature between 36°F and 46°F (2°C and 8°C). If you can’t refrigerate it, you can store it at temperatures up to 77°F (25°C) for up to 14 days.
  • Once you’ve stored this drug at room temperature, don’t put it back into the refrigerator. If you don’t use an Enbrel product within 14 days at room temperature, throw it away properly. Mixed powder should be used right away or kept in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.
  • Don’t freeze this drug. Don’t use it if it was frozen and then thawed.
  • Be sure to avoid shaking the medication.
  • Keep this drug in its original carton until you use it to protect it from light. Keep it away from extreme heat or cold. Don’t use it after the expiration date printed on the label.
    • Store the AutoTouch reusable auto-injector at room temperature. Don’t refrigerate it.

For Erelzi products:

  • Store this drug in the refrigerator. Keep it at a temperature between 36°F and 46°F (2°C and 8°C). If you can’t refrigerate it, you can store it at a temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) for up to 28 days.
  • Once you’ve stored this drug at room temperature, don’t put it back into the refrigerator. If you don’t use an Erelzi product within 28 days at room temperature, throw it away properly.
  • Don’t freeze this drug. Don’t use it if it was frozen and then thawed.
  • Be sure to avoid shaking the medication.
  • Keep this drug in its original carton until you use it to protect it from light. Keep it away from extreme heat or cold. Don’t use it after the expiration date printed on the label.
  • Don’t throw used needles, syringes, pens, or cartridges away in your household trash. Don’t flush them down the toilet either.
  • Ask your pharmacist for a needle clipper and an FDA-approved disposal container for throwing away used needles, syringes, pens, and cartridges.
  • When the container is almost full, follow your community guidelines for the right way to throw it away. Your community may have a program for disposing of needles, syringes, pens, and cartridges. Be sure to follow any local laws your state may have on how to throw away these items.
  • Don’t throw the container in your household trash or recycle it. (If you need to put the container in the trash, label it “Do not recycle.”)

Disposal

Clinical monitoring

During your treatment with this drug, your doctor may do certain tests. These will help keep you safe while you take etanercept. These tests may include:

  • Tuberculosis (TB) test: Your doctor may test you for TB before starting this drug and check you closely for TB symptoms during treatment.
  • Hepatitis B virus test: If you carry the hepatitis B virus, your doctor may do blood tests before you start treatment, while you’re using this drug, and for several months after you stop using the drug.

Refills

A prescription for this medication is refillable. You should not need a new prescription for this medication to be refilled. Your doctor will write the number of refills authorized on your prescription.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Always carry your medication with you. When flying, never put it into a checked bag. Keep it in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t harm your medication.
  • You may need to show airport staff the pharmacy label for your medication. Always carry the original prescription-labeled container with you.
  • This medication normally needs to be refrigerated. When traveling, you can store it at temperatures up to 77°F (25°C) for up to 14 days.
  • Needles and syringes need to be used to take this medication. Check for special rules about traveling with needles and syringes.
  • Be sure you have enough medication before you start your trip. It may be difficult to get this medication at a pharmacy while you’re traveling.
  • Don’t put this medication in your car’s glove compartment or leave it in the car. Be sure to avoid doing this when the weather is very hot or very cold.

Availability

Not every pharmacy stocks this drug. When filling your prescription, be sure to call ahead to make sure your pharmacy carries it.

Hidden costs

In addition to this drug, you’ll need to buy sterile alcohol wipes, gauze, and a container for safe disposal of needles, syringes, pens, and cartridges.

Prior authorization

Many insurance companies require a prior authorization for this drug. This means your doctor will need to get approval from your insurance company before your insurance company will pay for the prescription.

Are there any alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be better suited for you than others. Talk to your doctor about other drug options that may work for you.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.