Yaz (drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol) is a prescription birth control pill that’s also used to treat acne and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in certain people. Yaz can interact with other medications, such as seizure drugs and certain supplements.

An interaction can occur because one substance causes another substance to have a different effect than expected. Interactions can also occur if you have certain health conditions.

Before you start taking Yaz, tell your doctor and pharmacist about any prescription, over-the-counter, or other drugs you take. Sharing this information with them may help prevent possible interactions. (To learn whether Yaz interacts with herbs or vitamins and supplements, see the “Are there other interactions with Yaz?” section below.)

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The table below lists drugs that may interact with Yaz. Keep in mind that this table does not include all drugs that may interact with Yaz. For more information about some of these interactions, see the “Drug interactions explained” section below.

Drug group or drug nameDrug examplesWhat can happen
certain seizure medicationscarbamazepine (Tegretol, others)
• phenobarbital
phenytoin (Dilantin)
topiramate (Topamax)
can make Yaz less effective
potassium-sparing diureticseplerenone (Inspra)
spironolactone (Aldactone, Carospir)
• triamterene (Dyrenium)
can increase the risk of a high potassium level
certain HIV drugs • atazanavir (Reyataz)
• cobicistat (Tybost)
• ritonavir (Norvir)
• tipranavir (Aptivus)
can make Yaz less effective or increase the risk of side effects from Yaz
certain antibioticsclarithromycin
erythromycin (Ery-Tab, Eryc)
• rifabutin (Mycobutin)
• rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane)
can make Yaz less effective or increase the risk of side effects from Yaz
certain antifungals• itraconazole (Sporanox)
griseofulvin
ketoconazole
can make Yaz less effective or increase the risk of side effects from Yaz
certain cancer drugs• bexarotene (Targretin)
• dabrafenib (Tafinlar)
• lorlatinib (Lorbrena)
• mitotane (Lysodren)
can make Yaz less effective
certain blood pressure medicationsACE inhibitors such as lisinopril (Zestril)
• angiotensin receptor blockers, such as losartan (Cozaar)
can increase the risk of a high potassium level
ulipristal (Ella, Logilia)can make Yaz less effective
tirzepatide (Mounjaro, Zepbound)can make Yaz less effective
armodafinil (Nuvigil) and modafinil (Provigil)can make Yaz less effective

Certain health conditions or other factors could raise your risk of harm if you take Yaz. In such cases, your doctor may not prescribe Yaz for you. These are known as contraindications. The list below includes contraindications of Yaz.

If you have kidney, liver, or adrenal gland problems: If your kidneys, liver, or adrenal glands don’t function as they should, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because you may have an increased risk of a high potassium level while taking the drug. You can ask your doctor about other forms of birth control that may be better options for you.

If you’ve had breast cancer: If you have breast cancer or have had it in the past, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because taking Yaz could make your breast cancer get worse or come back. Your doctor can tell you about other forms of birth control that may be safer for you.

If you have abnormal vaginal bleeding: If you have abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as irregular or heavy periods, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz until they’ve looked into the cause. This is because taking Yaz could change your periods and make it difficult to diagnose any problems.

If you have a high risk of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke: If you have a high risk of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because taking the drug can increase your risk of these issues. You can ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better options for you. Examples of health factors that increase the risk of blood clots, heart attack, and stroke include:

  • being older than age 35 years old and smoking cigarettes* or having migraine
  • current or past blood clot, such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism
  • heart disease, irregular heartbeat, or past heart attack or stroke
  • high blood pressure that’s not well-managed
  • diabetes with complications that affect your blood vessels
  • blood disorders that increase the risk of clotting

If you’ve had an allergic reaction: If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Yaz or any of its ingredients, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because taking the drug could cause another allergic reaction. You can ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better options for you.

Before you start taking Yaz, talk with your doctor if any of the factors above apply to you. Your doctor can determine whether Yaz is safe for you to take.

* Yaz has a boxed warning about the risk of cigarette smoking and serious cardiovascular events. To learn more, see the “Boxed warning” section above.

Yaz is not known to interact with alcohol. It’s likely safe to consume alcohol while taking Yaz.

If you have questions about consuming alcohol while taking Yaz, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Learn more about certain drug interactions that can occur with Yaz.

Interaction with certain seizure medications

Yaz can interact with certain seizure medications, which are prescribed to treat seizure disorders such as epilepsy. Some are also prescribed for certain other conditions, such as bipolar disorder, migraine, and certain types of nerve pain.

Examples of seizure medications that can interact with Yaz include:

What could happen

Certain seizure medications can increase the activity of an enzyme (type of protein) in your body that helps break down Yaz. Taking Yaz with one of these seizure medications can lower the amount of Yaz in your body. This can make Yaz less effective.

What you can do

Your doctor will likely not prescribe Yaz with a seizure medication that interacts with Yaz. Instead, they may recommend either a different form of birth control or switching to a different seizure medication that doesn’t interact with Yaz.

If you take Yaz with a seizure medication that can affect Yaz, your doctor will likely recommend that you use an extra form of birth control as well. Examples include condoms or a diaphragm. You should use extra birth control for as long as you take the seizure medication and for 1 month after stopping it.

If you have questions about taking Yaz with seizure medications, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Interaction with certain antibiotics

Yaz can interact with certain antibiotic drugs, which are prescribed to treat bacterial infections.

Examples of antibiotics that can interact with Yaz include:

What could happen

Certain antibiotics, such as rifampin and rifabutin, can increase the activity of an enzyme in your body that helps break down Yaz. Taking Yaz with one of these antibiotics can lower the amount of Yaz in your body. This can make Yaz less effective.

Certain other antibiotics, such as clarithromycin or erythromycin, can reduce the activity of an enzyme that helps break down Yaz. This could make Yaz build up in your body, which could raise your risk of side effects from Yaz.

Antibiotics can sometimes cause vomiting or diarrhea. If you have vomiting or diarrhea when taking an antibiotic with Yaz, this could prevent Yaz from being absorbed into your body correctly. This could make Yaz less effective.

What you can do

If you take Yaz with an antibiotic, you should continue taking Yaz as prescribed by your doctor.

If you take certain antibiotics with Yaz, such as rifampin or rifabutin, your doctor will likely recommend using extra birth control, such as condoms or a diaphragm. They’ll likely recommend continuing the extra birth control for 1 month after finishing treatment with the antibiotic.

If you take certain other antibiotics with Yaz, such as clarithromycin, your doctor may monitor you for certain side effects of Yaz. These include a high potassium level.

If you have vomiting or diarrhea while taking an antibiotic with Yaz, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about what to do. They may recommend using an extra form of birth control for a short time.

If you have questions about taking Yaz with antibiotics, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Interaction with potassium-sparing diuretics

Yaz can interact with potassium-sparing diuretics, which are prescribed to treat fluid buildup from certain conditions, such as heart failure. Diuretics are sometimes called water pills.

Examples of potassium-sparing diuretics include:

What could happen

Both Yaz and potassium-sparing diuretics can cause a high potassium level in your blood. Taking Yaz with a potassium-sparing diuretic can raise your risk of this side effect.

If you have kidney problems or diabetes, you may have a higher risk of high potassium if you take Yaz with a potassium-sparing diuretic.

What you can do

If you take Yaz with a potassium-sparing diuretic, your doctor may order blood tests to monitor your potassium level during your treatment. Tell your doctor if you have symptoms of high potassium. These may include muscle twitching, cramps, or weakness.

If you have questions about taking Yaz with diuretics, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Yaz may have other interactions. They could occur with supplements, foods, vaccines, or even lab tests. See below for details. Note that the information below does not include all other possible interactions with Yaz.

Does Yaz interact with supplements?

Before you start taking Yaz, talk with your doctor and pharmacist about any herbs or vitamins and supplements you take. Sharing this information with them may help you avoid possible interactions.

If you have questions about interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Yaz interactions with herbs

Yaz can interact with St John’s wort, which some people take to help ease symptoms of depression and other conditions.

Your doctor will likely recommend that you avoid taking St. John’s wort while taking Yaz. That’s because St. John’s wort speeds up the action of an enzyme (type of protein) in your body that helps break down Yaz. So taking St. John’s wort with Yaz can make Yaz less effective.

There aren’t currently any other reports of herbs interacting with Yaz. But it’s still important to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other herbal products while taking Yaz.

Yaz interactions with vitamins and minerals

Taking vitamin C supplements with Yaz may stop your body breaking down the ethinyl estradiol in Yaz as well as it should. This could raise your risk of certain estrogen-related side effects of Yaz, such as headache or breast tenderness.

Taking potassium supplements with Yaz can also increase your risk of a high potassium level, which is another possible side effect of Yaz.

For this reason, you should check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking vitamin C, potassium, or multivitamin supplements while taking Yaz.

Does Yaz interact with food?

Consuming grapefruit or grapefruit juice with Yaz may stop your body from breaking down Yaz correctly. This could raise your risk of side effects from Yaz, such as an increased potassium level.

Your doctor may recommend that you don’t suddenly change the amount of grapefruit or grapefruit juice you consume while you’re taking Yaz. Or they may recommend that you avoid grapefruit products or limit the amount you consume while taking Yaz.

Although Yaz can interact with potassium and vitamin C supplements, there are currently no reports of Yaz interacting with foods that contain vitamin C or potassium. The amount of potassium or vitamin C in food is usually lower than the amount in supplements.

If you have questions about eating certain foods during your treatment with Yaz, talk with your doctor.

Does Yaz interact with vaccines?

There are currently no reports of Yaz interacting with vaccines. If you have questions about getting certain vaccines during Yaz treatment, talk with your doctor.

Does Yaz interact with lab tests?

Yaz can interact with the following lab tests:

If you need to have one of these tests done, make sure the healthcare professional administering the test knows you’re taking Yaz.

Does Yaz interact with cannabis or CBD?

Cannabis (commonly called marijuana) and cannabis products, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have been specifically reported to interact with Yaz.

Taking cannabis or cannabis products with Yaz could make your body break down Yaz faster than usual. This could make Yaz less effective.

Before you start treatment with Yaz, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you use cannabis. By sharing this information with them, you may help prevent possible interactions.

Note: Cannabis is illegal at a federal level but is legal in many states to varying degrees.

Certain medical conditions or other health factors may raise the risk of interactions with Yaz. Before taking Yaz, talk with your doctor about your health history. They’ll determine whether Yaz is right for you.

Health conditions or other factors that might interact with Yaz include:

Liver, kidney, or adrenal gland problems: If your kidneys, liver, or adrenal glands don’t function correctly, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because you may have an increased risk of high potassium while taking the drug.

Risk of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke: If you have a high risk of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. For more information, see the “When should I avoid Yaz?” section above.

Heart disease risk factors: If you have risk factors for heart disease, you may have a higher risk of blood clots, heart attack, and stroke with Yaz. These risk factors include smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. If you have any of these risk factors, talk with your doctor about whether Yaz is right for you.

Breast cancer: If you have breast cancer or have had it in the past, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz for you. This is because taking Yaz could make your breast cancer get worse or come back.

Abnormal vaginal bleeding: If you have abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as irregular or heavy periods, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Yaz until they’ve looked into the cause. This is because taking Yaz could change your periods and make it difficult to diagnose any problems.

Depression: Yaz can cause depression in some people. If you have depression or have had it in the past, talk with your doctor about whether Yaz is right for you.

Hereditary angioedema (HAE): If you have HAE, taking Yaz may worsen your condition. Talk with your doctor about whether Yaz is right for you.

Melasma during pregnancy: If you’ve had melasma while pregnant, you may have a higher risk of melasma while taking Yaz. To reduce this risk, your doctor may recommend protecting your skin from UV light and sunlight while taking Yaz.

Pregnancy: Yaz is prescribed to help prevent pregnancy. Your doctor won’t prescribe it if you’re pregnant. If you’ve recently given birth, your doctor won’t prescribe Yaz for at least 4 weeks after delivery. This is because there’s a higher risk of blood clots if you take Yaz during this time.

Breastfeeding: Doctors usually won’t prescribe Yaz if you’re breastfeeding. Yaz passes into breast milk, but it isn’t known whether the drug may cause side effects in a child who’s breastfed. Yaz can also reduce the amount of breast milk your body makes. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about other birth control options.

Allergic reaction: If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Yaz or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Yaz. This is because taking the drug could cause another allergic reaction. You can ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better choices for you.

Taking certain steps can help you avoid interactions with Yaz. Before starting treatment, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Things to discuss with them include:

  • Whether you use cannabis.
  • Other medications you take, as well as any vitamins, supplements, and herbs. Your doctor or pharmacist can help you fill out a medication list.
  • What to do if you start taking a new drug during your Yaz treatment.

It’s also important to understand Yaz’s label and other paperwork that may come with the drug. Colored stickers that describe interactions may be on the label. And the paperwork (sometimes called the patient package insert or medication guide) may have other details about interactions. (If you did not get paperwork with Yaz, ask your pharmacist to print a copy for you.)

If you have difficulty reading or understanding this information, your doctor or pharmacist can help.

Taking Yaz exactly as prescribed can also help prevent interactions.

If you still have questions about Yaz and its possible interactions, talk with your doctor.

Questions you may want to ask include:

  • Do other birth control pills have similar interactions to Yaz?
  • Are there any over-the-counter drugs I should not take with Yaz?
  • If I have a health condition that interacts with Yaz, will I need extra monitoring during my treatment?

To learn more about Yaz, see these articles:

To get information on different conditions and tips for improving your health, subscribe to any of Healthline’s newsletters. You may also want to check out the online communities at Bezzy. It’s a place where people with certain conditions can find support and connect with others.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.