If you have migraine, your doctor might suggest Vyepti as a treatment option. It’s a prescription drug used to help prevent migraine episodes in adults.

Vyepti contains the active ingredient eptinezumab-jjmr, which is a kind of drug called a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist. It blocks a protein that’s involved in causing migraine episodes. Vyepti is a biologic drug, which means it’s made using living cells.

Vyepti is given by intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into your vein given over time). Your healthcare professional will give you Vyepti infusions in your doctor’s office, a hospital, or an infusion center.

This article describes the dosage of Vyepti, as well as its strength and how to use it. To learn more about Vyepti, see this in-depth article.

Note: This article covers Vyepti’s typical dosages, which are provided by the drug’s manufacturer. But your doctor will prescribe the Vyepti dosage that’s right for you.

Here’s some information on the dosage of Vyepti used to help prevent migraines.

What form does Vyepti come in?

Vyepti comes as a liquid solution inside a single-dose vial. It’s given by intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into your vein given over time). Your healthcare professional will give you Vyepti infusions in your doctor’s office, a hospital, or an infusion center.

What strength does Vyepti come in?

Vyepti comes in one strength: 100 milligrams (mg) per milliliter (mL).

What are the typical dosages of Vyepti?

The information below describes the dosages most commonly given or recommended. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

The typical Vyepti infusion dosage is 100 mg given once every 3 months.

If that dosage isn’t effective, your doctor may increase it to 300 mg once every 3 months.

Is Vyepti used long term?

Yes, Vyepti is typically used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Vyepti is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely receive it long term.

Vyepti is given by intravenous (IV) infusion. This is an injection into a vein (in this case, in your arm) that’s given over time. Each infusion typically takes about 30 minutes.

Your healthcare professional will give you Vyepti infusions in your doctor’s office, a hospital, or an infusion center. You’ll typically have an infusion once every 3 months.

For each infusion, be sure to:

  • drink plenty of water beforehand so you’re well hydrated
  • wear comfortable clothing that can be rolled up over your elbow

After the infusion, you should be able to go about your day as usual.

If you miss an appointment for a Vyepti infusion, call your doctor’s office as soon as possible to reschedule. Your migraine episodes may come back or get worse if you miss a dose.

The sections above describe the typical dosage provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Vyepti for you, they will prescribe the dosage that’s right for you. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your current dosage.

Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • If the 100-mg dosage of Vyepti doesn’t work well enough for me, is it likely that 300 mg will?
  • How long will I need to wait before my dosage can be increased?
  • Does a higher dosage increase my risk of side effects from Vyepti?
  • Does my dosage of Vyepti need to change if I take other medications?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.