If you have certain types of cancer that affect blood cells, your doctor may suggest Revlimid (lenalidomide) as a treatment option.

Revlimid is a prescription medication that’s used to treat the certain types of the following cancers in adults:

Revlimid comes as a capsule that you swallow. It contains the active drug lenalidomide.

Revlimid belongs to a group of medications called immunomodulators. These drugs work to treat cancer by boosting the ability of your immune system to fight the cancer’s growth. Immunomodulators also target and kill cancer cells and cut off their blood supply.

This article describes the dosages of Revlimid, including its form, strengths, and how to take the drug. To learn more about Revlimid, see this in-depth article.

Note: This article covers Revlimid’s typical dosages, which are provided by the drug’s manufacturer. But when using Revlimid, always take the dosage that your doctor prescribes.

Below are answers to common questions about the dosage of Revlimid.

What is Revlimid’s form?

Revlimid comes as a capsule you take by mouth. You’ll swallow them whole with water.

What strengths does Revlimid come in?

Revlimid is available in several strengths: 2.5 milligrams (mg), 5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg, 20 mg, and 25 mg.

What are the typical dosages of Revlimid?

The information below describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended for Revlimid. The dosage of Revlimid depends on the condition being treated. For most conditions, your doctor will give you a dosing schedule or cycle for you to follow while taking this medication.

Be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They may adjust your dosage over time to reach the right amount for you.

Dosage for multiple myeloma

The usual starting dose of Revlimid for multiple myeloma depends on whether or not you’ve had a stem cell transplant.

If you haven’t had a stem cell transplant, the starting dose of Revlimid for multiple myeloma is 25 mg. You’ll take this dose once daily on days 1 to 21 of a 28-day cycle. You won’t take the drug on days 22 to 28 of the cycle. Once a cycle ends, you’ll start a new cycle. Your doctor will tell you how many cycles you should complete.

If you haven’t had a stem cell transplant, you’ll take Revlimid along with dexamethasone, a steroid medication.

If you’ve had a stem cell transplant, the starting dose of Revlimid for multiple myeloma is 10 mg once daily. You’ll take this dose every day of a 28-day cycle.

Once a cycle ends, you’ll start a new cycle. Your doctor will tell you how many cycles you should complete. They may adjust your dosage of Revlimid when you start a new cycle.

Dosage for mantle cell lymphoma

The usual dose of Revlimid for mantle cell lymphoma is 25 mg. You’ll take this dose once daily on days 1 to 21 of repeated 28-day cycles. You won’t take Revlimid on days 22 to 28 of the cycle.

Your doctor may adjust your dosage of Revlimid over time.

Dosage for myelodysplastic syndromes

The usual dosage of Revlimid for myelodysplastic syndromes is 10 mg daily.

Your doctor may adjust your dosage of Revlimid over time.

Dosage for follicular or marginal zone lymphoma

The usual dose of Revlimid for follicular or marginal zone lymphoma is 20 mg. You’ll take this dose once daily on days 1 to 21 of repeated 28-day cycles. You won’t take Revlimid on days 22 to 28 of the cycle.

Once the cycle ends, you’ll start a new cycle. Your doctor will tell you how many cycles you should complete, up to 12. They may adjust your dosage of Revlimid over time.

To treat these conditions, you’ll take Revlimid along with a medication called rituximab (Riabni, Rituxan, Ruxience, Truxima).

Is Revlimid used long term?

Yes, Revlimid is typically used as a long-term treatment. For most conditions, your doctor will give you a dosing schedule or cycle to follow. Based on how your body responds to this drug, your doctor will tell you how many cycles to complete.

Your doctor will monitor how your body responds to Revlimid treatment using blood tests. If you develop certain side effects (such as decreased blood cell levels or severe skin reactions), your doctor may adjust your dosage. Or they may have you temporarily stop treatment and then restart it at a lower dosage.

If you have questions about how long you’re likely to take Revlimid, talk with your doctor.

Dosage adjustments

If you have renal failure or other kidney problems, your doctor will likely prescribe a lower dosage of Revlimid for you. Your doctor will adjust your dose depending on the severity of your kidney problems.

For more details about renal dosing adjustments for Revlimid, see the drug’s prescribing information.

The dosage of Revlimid you’re prescribed may depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Revlimid to treat
  • how your body responds to the drug
  • any side effects you may experience
  • other conditions you may have (see “Dosage adjustments” directly above)

You should take Revlimid according to your doctor’s instructions.

Depending on the condition being treated, your doctor may give you a dosing schedule or cycle to follow while taking Revlimid. A typical dosing cycle is 28 days. During this timeframe you’ll likely take a dose on days 1 to 21 and no dose on days 22 to 28. Once the cycle ends, you’ll start a new cycle. Your doctor will tell you how many cycles you should complete.

You should take your daily dose of Revlimid around the same time each day (according to your dosing cycle). Choose the time of day that’s easiest for you to remember to take it. You may take Revlimid with or without food.

You’ll swallow Revlimid capsules whole with water. You shouldn’t open, break, or chew the capsules.

You should not touch or handle Revlimid capsules any more than you have to. If powder from inside the capsules comes in contact with your skin, wash the area immediately with soap and water. If the powder gets into your eyes, nose, or mouth, rinse the area thoroughly with water.

You should take your dose of Revlimid at about the same time each day. If you miss a dose of Revlimid, take the missed dose as soon as possible, up to 12 hours after your usual time.

But if you miss your dose of Revlimid by 12 hours or more, skip that day’s dose. Then, the next day, you should take Revlimid at your usual time. Don’t take two doses to make up for a missed dose.

If you need help remembering to take your dose of Revlimid on time, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or downloading a reminder app on your phone.

Don’t use more Revlimid than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an overdose can include:

What to do in case you take too much Revlimid

Call your doctor right away if you think you’ve taken/used too much Revlimid. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, call 911 (or your local emergency number) immediately or go to the nearest emergency room.

The sections above describe the typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Revlimid for you, they will prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

Remember, you shouldn’t change your dosage of Revlimid without your doctor’s recommendation. Only take Revlimid exactly as prescribed. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your current dosage.

Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Should my dosage change if Revlimid isn’t working well enough for me?
  • Will you need to alter my dosage of Revlimid if I take certain other medications with it?
  • How long is it safe to take Revlimid?

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.