If you have a certain type of autoimmune condition, your doctor might suggest Remicade (infliximab) as a treatment option for you.

Remicade is a prescription medication that’s used to treat:

This article describes the dosages of Remicade, including its form, strength, and how to take the drug. To learn more about Remicade, see this in-depth article.

Note: This article covers Remicade’s typical dosages, which are provided by the drug’s manufacturer. But your doctor will determine the dosage of Remicade that’s best for treating your condition.

Remicade is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein over a period of time). Each infusion usually lasts 2 hours. You’ll receive Remicade infusions at your doctor’s office or an infusion clinic.

What is Remicade’s form?

Remicade is available as a powder that comes in a vial. Before each infusion, your doctor will mix the powder with a liquid to form a solution.

What strength does Remicade come in?

Remicade comes in one strength: 100 milligrams (mg) per vial.

What are the typical dosages of Remicade?

The dosage of Remicade you’re prescribed will be based on your weight in kilograms (kg)* and the condition you’re using Remicade to treat.

Typically, your doctor will start you on the dosage that’s recommended to treat your condition. Your doctor may use a dosage calculator to determine this dose. Then they’ll monitor your condition over time to make sure the drug is working for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest maintenance dosage that provides the desired effect.

The information below describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

* One kg is about 2.2 pounds (lb).

Dosage for psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, plaque psoriasis, and ulcerative colitis

The recommended dosage level for Remicade is the same when used to treat the following conditions in adults:

For each of these conditions, your starting dose of Remicade is 5 mg per kg (mg/kg) of body weight. This is given for your first dose and the doses you’ll receive at weeks 2 and 6. After that, you’ll receive 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Over time, Remicade may become less effective at treating Crohn’s disease in some adults. If this happens, your doctor may increase your Remicade dosage to 10 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Dosage for ankylosing spondylitis

When prescribed to treat ankylosing spondylitis in adults, the recommended starting dose of Remicade is 5 mg/kg of body weight. This is given for your first dose and the doses you’ll receive at weeks 2 and 6. After that, you’ll receive 5 mg/kg every 6 weeks.

Dosage for rheumatoid arthritis

For treating rheumatoid arthritis in adults, the usual starting dose of Remicade is 3 mg/kg. This is given for your first dose and the doses you’ll receive at weeks 2 and 6. After that, you’ll receive 3 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Over time, Remicade may become less effective for treating your condition. If this happens, your doctor may increase your Remicade dosage up to 10 mg/kg every 8 weeks. Or they may prescribe 3 mg/kg as often as every 4 weeks.

What’s the dosage of Remicade for children?

Remicade is prescribed to treat ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease in children ages 6 years and older. The dosage of Remicade for children is the same dosage that’s used for these conditions in adults. For more information, see “Dosage for psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, plaque psoriasis, and ulcerative colitis” above.

Is Remicade used long term?

Yes, Remicade is typically used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Remicade is safe and effective for you, it’s likely that you’ll use it long term.

However, if you’re an adult with Crohn’s disease that doesn’t respond to Remicade by week 14, your doctor may switch you to a different medication.

Dosage adjustments

Your doctor may adjust your dosage if you have certain conditions, such as heart failure. Be sure to talk with your doctor about any health conditions you have before starting Remicade.

Remicade is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein over a period of time). Each infusion usually lasts 2 hours.

You’ll receive Remicade infusions at your doctor’s office or an infusion clinic. Your doctor will explain the infusion process (sometimes called the infusion protocol) so you know what to expect when receiving the drug.

You can also visit the drug manufacturer’s website to learn more about how Remicade is given.

Receiving premedications with Remicade

If you experience infusion side effects such as fever or itchy skin, your doctor may slow down your infusion. They may also give you certain medications, called premedications, before your next Remicade infusion to lower your risk for these side effects.

Premedications that you may receive include:

The dosage of Remicade you’re prescribed may depend on several factors. These include:

  • the condition you’re using Remicade to treat
  • your weight
  • other medications you take
  • other conditions you may have (see “Dosage adjustments” under “What is Remicade’s dosage?”)

It’s important to keep all your appointments to receive your Remicade doses. You need to receive consistent doses of the drug to improve your condition. If you do miss an infusion appointment, call your doctor’s office right away to reschedule.

If you need help remembering your infusion appointments, try setting a reminder on your phone.

The sections above describe the typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Remicade for you, they’ll prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

Remember, you won’t give yourself Remicade doses. You’ll receive the infusions at your doctor’s office or an infusion clinic. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your current dosage.

Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Would a different dosage raise or lower my risk for side effects from Remicade?
  • Will I have to receive my Remicade doses at a special infusion center?
  • What should I expect during my Remicade infusion?

You can subscribe to the Healthline newsletters for psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis if you use Remicade for either of these conditions.

Q:

Is there anything I should do to prepare for my Remicade infusions?

Anonymous patient

A:

Yes, there are a few things you can do to prepare for your Remicade infusions.

Drink plenty of fluids before your infusion. You’ll also want to wear comfortable clothes, in layers, in case you get too warm or cold.

Remicade infusions typically last about 2 hours. Consider bringing a book or your phone to help pass the time. (And if your child is receiving Remicade, you can bring toys or activity books to help keep them occupied.)

Before your infusion, your doctor or nurse will ask questions about your health. So be sure you’re ready to answer questions about your medical history.

If you have other questions about preparing for your Remicade infusions, talk with your doctor.

Dana Kim, PharmDAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.
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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.