If you’ve been diagnosed with a certain mental health condition, your doctor may recommend quetiapine ER oral tablet.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used in adults and some children to treat:

Your doctor may prescribe quetiapine alone for schizophrenia. The drug is used alone or together with other medications for bipolar disorder. And it’s used together with an antidepressant for MDD.

To learn more about these conditions and how quetiapine treats them see the “What is quetiapine ER oral tablet used for?” section below. Read on to learn about quetiapine ER oral tablet’s uses, dosage, side effects, and more.

Quetiapine ER oral tablet basics

Quetiapine is an active drug ingredient. It comes as oral tablets that you’ll swallow. It’s classified as an atypical antipsychotic. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in similar ways.)

Quetiapine ER oral tablets are an extended-release form of the drug. This means the tablets slowly release their contents into your body over a period of time. This is unlike immediate-release tablets, which release their contents all at once.

Note: Quetiapine also comes as immediate-release oral tablets. But only extended-release quetiapine tablets are described in this article. If you’d like to learn about quetiapine’s other forms, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Quetiapine ER oral tablet brand-name versions

Quetiapine ER oral tablet is the generic version of the brand-name drug Seroquel XR.

Note: The other forms of quetiapine have other brand-names. To learn about these other versions, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Quetiapine ER oral tablets are a generic drug, which means they’re an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The brand-name medication that quetiapine ER oral tablets are based on is called Seroquel XR.

Generic drugs are thought to be as safe and effective as the brand-name drug they’re based on. In general, generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs do.

If you’d like to know more about using Seroquel XR instead of quetiapine ER oral tablets, talk with your doctor. And, view this Healthline article to learn more about the differences between generic and brand-name drugs.

Like most drugs, quetiapine ER oral tablets may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that quetiapine ER oral tablets may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of quetiapine ER oral tablets. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that quetiapine ER oral tablets can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read quetiapine ER oral tablet’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of quetiapine ER oral tablets that have been reported include:

  • constipation
  • dry mouth
  • dizziness
  • tiredness
  • sleep problems, such as sleepiness or insomnia (trouble falling asleep or staying asleep)*

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from quetiapine ER oral tablets can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from quetiapine ER oral tablets, call your doctor right away. If you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of quetiapine ER oral tablets that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects quetiapine ER oral tablets may cause.

Boxed warnings

Quetiapine ER oral tablets have boxed warnings. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The drug’s boxed warnings are described below.

Increased risk of death in certain people. Certain older adults ages 65 years and older have an increased risk of death with use of quetiapine. This risk applies to people with psychosis that’s related to dementia. (With dementia, you have changes in your mental status.)

Symptoms of psychosis can include:

In studies, most of the deaths related to this risk were caused by:

Suicidal thoughts or actions. Drugs used to treat depression can rarely increase the risk of worsening depression and suicidal thoughts or actions. (Keep in mind that quetiapine treats depression.) People at highest risk are children, adolescents, and young adults ages 24 and younger.

It’s important to note that quetiapine shouldn’t be used in children younger than 10 years of age.

What might help

It’s not clear why quetiapine use has an increased risk of death in older adults with psychosis that’s linked to dementia. This risk may be higher if you have other health conditions or take other medications with similar side effects.

Your doctor can give you more information about this risk. And they’ll recommend if quetiapine is right for you.

The risk of suicidal thoughts or actions with quetiapine in younger people is higher if they have other mental health conditions. These could include conditions such as depression or bipolar disorder.

If you have concerns about taking quetiapine given these side effects, talk with your doctor. Share your medical history, including if you’ve ever had suicidal thoughts or actions or other mental health conditions. Your doctor can tell you about the pros and cons of using this drug for your condition.

SUICIDE PREVENTION

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Weight gain

Quetiapine may cause weight gain. This is a common side effect of an atypical antipsychotic, which is the type of drug quetiapine is.

How much weight you may gain with this drug can depend on:

  • your diet
  • your lifestyle and activity level
  • your genetics
  • other factors, such as how long you’ve been taking quetiapine

What might help

If you have a weight change with quetiapine, discuss it with your doctor. They can suggest ways to manage your weight while you’re taking this drug. They may recommend certain changes in your diet and exercise habits.

Don’t stop taking quetiapine on your own if you gain weight with the drug. Instead, talk about your concerns with your doctor and ask them how to manage this side effect.

Sleep problems, such as insomnia or sleepiness

You’ll likely feel sleepy or drowsy while you’re taking quetiapine ER oral tablets.

Sleepiness was the most commonly reported side effect in studies of the drug. For most people, sleepiness from quetiapine improves within a few days or weeks. But sleepiness may sometimes continue for as long as you’re taking the drug.

Less commonly, some people have insomnia (trouble falling asleep or staying asleep) with quetiapine. In some cases, insomnia can be an early warning sign of worsening depression, which quetiapine is used to treat.

While rare, drugs that treat depression can increase the risk of worsening depression and suicidal thoughts or actions. This risk is higher in people ages age 24 or younger. See the “Boxed warnings” section above for more details.

What might help

Because sleepiness is a possible side effect of quetiapine, it’s best to take the drug in the evening.

If you have drowsiness or sleepiness with quetiapine, be careful doing any activities that require you to be alert. This could include activities such as driving or operating machinery. Be cautious until your body becomes used to the effects of quetiapine.

Also, be sure to tell your doctor if you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep while taking quetiapine. They may suggest changes to your treatment plan.

Ask your doctor for more information about sleep problems with quetiapine and how to manage them. If the problems continue or are bothersome, your doctor can discuss other treatment options. But don’t stop taking quetiapine on your own. Instead, talk with your doctor about any concerns you have with the drug.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to quetiapine ER oral tablets.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to quetiapine ER oral tablets. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about quetiapine ER oral tablets.

Is quetiapine used for sleep, anxiety, or dementia? If so, what’s the dosage for these uses?

Quetiapine isn’t approved for these uses. But, your doctor may prescribe quetiapine off-label for certain anxiety disorders, sleep problems, or other conditions. (With off-label use, a drug is prescribed for a condition other than what it’s approved to treat.)

You should know that anxiety and sleepiness are side effects of this drug. Using quetiapine in older adults to treat psychosis that’s related to dementia increases their risk of death.* (With psychosis, you lose touch with reality. With dementia, you have changes in your mental status.)

Your doctor can provide more information about quetiapine’s uses and your condition. They can also tell you about other medications that are used for anxiety, sleep problems, or dementia.

* Quetiapine ER oral tablets have a boxed warning for this risk. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information about these warnings, see the “What are quetiapine ER oral tablet’s side effects?” section above.

Is quetiapine a controlled substance? Will it make you feel ‘high’?

No, quetiapine isn’t a controlled substance.

Controlled substances have an increased risk for misuse, dependence, and addiction. (With misuse, a drug is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed. With dependence, your body needs the drug to feel normal. And with addiction, a drug is taken even if it’s causing harm.)

There weren’t any reports of euphoria (feeling high) in studies of quetiapine. But, there have been reports of drug misuse with quetiapine, especially misusing it with illegal drugs.

If you’ve ever experienced substance misuse, tell your doctor. Drugs that affect your brain chemicals can lead to misuse in some people. It’s unclear if this can happen with quetiapine, though.

Your doctor will closely monitor you while you’re taking quetiapine to make sure you don’t have problems with the drug. For more information about misuse, see the “Can quetiapine ER oral tablets be misused?” section below.

Does stopping quetiapine cause withdrawal symptoms?

Stopping a drug used to treat depression, such as quetiapine, after you’ve been taking it for a while may cause withdrawal symptoms. This is also called drug discontinuation syndrome.

Having withdrawal symptoms doesn’t mean you’re addicted to the drug. (With addiction, a drug is taken even if it’s causing harm. And you may have intense cravings for the drug.) Instead, it means your body has become used to having the drug, and you may have certain side effects when suddenly stopping the drug.

Stopping quetiapine ER oral tablets may cause withdrawal symptoms. If you suddenly stop taking the drug, these symptoms may last for around 1 week. Possible symptoms include:

  • irritability
  • insomnia (trouble sleeping)
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • headache

It’s important that you don’t suddenly stop taking quetiapine unless your doctor instructs you to do so.

If you’re having side effects or have other concerns with quetiapine, talk with your doctor. They may have you gradually reduce your dose before stopping the drug altogether. They may also suggest a different medication to replace quetiapine.

How does quetiapine work? How long does it stay in your system and work?

Quetiapine’s mechanism of action (how it works) isn’t clear. But the drug is thought to work by changing the levels of certain neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) to help improve moods. The neurotransmitters that quetiapine is thought to work on are dopamine and serotonin.

How long quetiapine stays in your system and works depends on factors including your genetics and how well your liver is working. The drug can stay in your system for a few days.

Will quetiapine cause erectile dysfunction or joint pain? Does the drug cause long-term side effects?

It’s possible to have sexual side effects, including erectile dysfunction, with quetiapine use. In some people, the drug can cause hyperprolactinemia (increased prolactin level). This condition can also cause erectile dysfunction.

Joint pain isn’t a reported side effect of quetiapine. But the drug can cause back pain and other movement-related problems.

In some cases, there may be long-term side effects of quetiapine. This depends on factors including your prescribed dosage, your overall health, and how long you’ve been taking quetiapine. Long term side effects can include:

Your doctor can tell you more about the possible side effects and risks of long-term side effects with quetiapine.

Is quetiapine a sleeping pill or a narcotic?

No, quetiapine isn’t a sleeping pill or a narcotic. Instead, quetiapine belongs to group of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. It’s used to manage symptoms of certain mental health conditions.

Quetiapine may cause sleepiness as a side effect, especially when you first start taking it. But it’s not approved for use as a sleep aid.

Opioid drugs are also called narcotics. These drugs are used for pain management.

To learn more about quetiapine’s uses, ask your doctor for more information.

Your doctor will explain how you should take quetiapine ER oral tablets. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking quetiapine ER oral tablet

You’ll take quetiapine ER oral tablets by mouth.

Quetiapine ER oral tablets are an extended-release form of the drug. This means the tablets slowly release their contents into your body over a period of time. This is unlike immediate-release tablets, which release their contents all at once.

Quetiapine ER oral tablets come in several strengths:

  • 50 milligrams (mg)
  • 150 mg
  • 200 mg
  • 300 mg
  • 400 mg

Quetiapine ER oral tablets don’t come in other strengths, such as 25 mg or 100 mg. But, immediate-release quetiapine tablets come in 25-mg and 100-mg strengths.

If your doctor prescribes a dose of quetiapine ER oral tablets that’s not available in a tablet strength, they’ll explain how you should take the prescribed dose.

Dosage

You’ll take quetiapine once each day. Your prescribed dosage will depend on:

  • the condition being treated
  • other health conditions you have and how well your liver, heart, and other organs are working
  • other medications you’re taking
  • your age

Your doctor will likely have you start with a low dosage of quetiapine. Then, they’ll increase it until they find the lowest effective dosage for your condition.

Taking quetiapine ER oral tablet with other drugs

Your doctor may prescribe quetiapine ER oral tablets either alone or together with other drugs. Whether you’ll take quetiapine with other drugs depends on your condition. For example:

To learn more about these conditions and how quetiapine treats them, see the “What is quetiapine ER oral tablet used for?” section below.

Some types of antidepressants that may be used with quetiapine include:

Ask your doctor for more information about taking quetiapine with other drugs.

Questions about taking quetiapine ER oral tablet

Here’s a list of questions related to taking quetiapine ER oral tablets.

  • What if I miss a dose of quetiapine ER oral tablets? If you miss a dose of quetiapine, take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next regular dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your normal schedule. Don’t take two doses of quetiapine to make up for the missed dose. Doing so can cause serious side effects. It’s important to take regular doses of quetiapine to manage your condition. The drug won’t work if you miss doses regularly. You might consider using a reminder tool to help keep you on track with your schedule.
  • Will I need to use quetiapine ER oral tablets long term? Quetiapine ER oral tablet is meant to be a long-term treatment. How long you’ll take it depends on how well this drug works to treat your condition. If you and your doctor decide that quetiapine is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.
  • Can quetiapine ER oral tablets be chewed, crushed, or split? No, you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew quetiapine ER oral tablets. Doing so can change how the drug works in your body. If you have trouble swallowing these tablets, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different form of quetiapine or offer other suggestions on how to take the drug. You can also try these tips for helping you swallow pills.
  • Should I take quetiapine ER oral tablets with food? Quetiapine ER tablets should be taken either on an empty stomach or with a light meal that contains about 300 calories.
  • How long do quetiapine ER oral tablets take to work? It may be a few weeks after you’ve started taking quetiapine regularly before your symptoms improve. Exactly how long it takes for quetiapine to work for you depends on your condition and how your body responds to the drug. Your doctor can tell you more about this and what to expect with treatment.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about quetiapine ER oral tablets and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will quetiapine ER orals tablet affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So, don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Talk with your doctor about all of your health conditions and the medications you take before starting treatment with quetiapine ER oral tablets. Your doctor can tell you if it’s safe for you to take this drug.

These and other considerations are described below.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking quetiapine ER oral tablets, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with quetiapine ER oral tablets.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Quetiapine ER oral tablets can interact with several types of drugs. Certain medications may increase or decrease the effects of quetiapine.

Your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of quetiapine if you need to take it with another drug that interacts with it.

Examples of drugs that interact with quetiapine ER oral tablets include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with quetiapine ER oral tablets. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of quetiapine ER oral tablets.

Boxed warnings

Quetiapine ER oral tablets have boxed warnings for use in certain people. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This drug’s boxed warnings are described below.

Increased risk of death in older adults with psychosis that’s related to dementia. Quetiapine should not be used in older adults ages 65 years and older to treat psychosis that’s associated with dementia. (With psychosis, you lose touch with reality. And with dementia, you have changes in your mental status.) If older people with this condition use quetiapine, their risk of death is increased.

Increased risk of suicidal thoughts or actions in people ages 24 years and younger. Drugs used to treat depression can rarely increase the risk of worsening depression and suicidal thoughts or actions. (Keep in mind that quetiapine treats depression.) People at highest risk are children, adolescents, and young adults ages 24 and younger. Quetiapine shouldn’t be used in children younger than 10 years of age.

For more information about these warnings, see the “What are quetiapine ER oral tablet’s side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

Quetiapine ER oral tablets may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take quetiapine ER oral tablets. Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Liver problems. If you have serious liver problems, your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of quetiapine. Tell your doctor if you have liver disease or other problems with your liver.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to quetiapine ER oral tablets or any of their ingredients, you shouldn’t take this medication. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Diabetes. Quetiapine can increase your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, taking quetiapine may increase your risk of serious complications, such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Your doctor may want you to monitor your blood sugar levels closely while you take quetiapine. Ask your doctor for more information about this.
  • Blood pressure or heart rhythm problems. Taking quetiapine can cause problems with your heart rhythm and blood pressure. For example, your blood pressure could become either too high or too low. Tell your doctor if you have a history of blood pressure issues or heart problems.
  • Seizures. Quetiapine may increase your risk of seizures. If you have a history of seizures, tell your doctor. They can tell you if it’s safe for you to take quetiapine.
  • Cholesterol problems. Quetiapine may increase your cholesterol levels. If you already have high cholesterol, the drug could worsen your condition. Your doctor may monitor your cholesterol levels during treatment with the drug and may recommend cholesterol-lowering medications.
  • Dehydration. Quetiapine can affect how your body temperature is regulated. This can increase your risk of becoming dehydrated (having a low fluid level in your body). Be sure to drink plenty of water while taking quetiapine, especially if you’re exposed to hot weather or are exercising.
  • Cataracts. Quetiapine may worsen cataracts. (With cataracts, you have cloudiness in the lens of your eye.) Be sure to let your doctor know if you have this condition. They’ll monitor your eyes before you start quetiapine and while you’re taking the drug.
  • Problems with your bladder, enlarged prostate, or constipation. Tell your doctor if you have constipation, prostate problems, or trouble emptying your bladder. Taking quetiapine could worsen these conditions. Ask your doctor for more information about these risks.
  • Low white blood cell level. Quetiapine can cause a low level of white blood cells (WBCs). If you already have a low WBC level, taking quetiapine could increase your risk of developing serious infections. Be sure to talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to take quetiapine.

Quetiapine ER oral tablet and alcohol

Drinking alcohol isn’t recommended while taking quetiapine. This is because alcohol can worsen some side effects of the drug, such as:

  • dizziness
  • sleepiness
  • movement problems
  • liver problems

If you drink alcohol, ask your doctor if it’s safe for you to drink while you’re taking quetiapine. Check with them to see how much alcohol is safe for you to consume.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

There’s not enough information known about the risks of taking quetiapine ER oral tablets during pregnancy.

Some data shows that antipsychotic drugs can cause extrapyramidal side effects in babies exposed to the drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy. (Extrapyramidal side effects are movement disorders caused by certain drugs.) Keep in mind that quetiapine is antipsychotic drug.

Newborn babies exposed to antipsychotics including quetiapine during pregnancy may experience withdrawal symptoms following birth. Examples of these symptoms include:

  • trouble feeding
  • tremors
  • sleepiness
  • trouble breathing

Your doctor can provide more information about the risks of quetiapine use during pregnancy. Be sure to tell your doctor if you become pregnant while taking quetiapine.

If you’re taking this drug during pregnancy, your doctor may talk with you about signing up with the National Pregnancy Registry for atypical antipsychotics. You can call them at 866-961-2388 or visit their website to learn more about the program.

It’s not known if quetiapine is safe to take while breastfeeding. The drug may pass into breast milk. Your doctor can tell you more about the safety of using quetiapine if you’re breastfeeding. They may also discuss using other ways to feed your child while you’re taking quetiapine.

If you’ve been diagnosed with a certain mental health condition, your doctor may recommend quetiapine ER oral tablet.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used for:

  • Schizophrenia. Quetiapine is used to treat schizophrenia in adults and children ages 13 years and older. It may be prescribed alone for schizophrenia treatment. With schizophrenia, you can have:
    • hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t really there)
    • disorganized thoughts or speech
    • agitation
    • changes in your mood and behavior
    • altered perceptions of reality
    • trouble with sleep
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD), which is also called depression. Quetiapine is used to treat depression in adults. It’s taken together with an antidepressant for this use. Symptoms of MDD can include:
    • sadness
    • loss of interest in daily life
    • trouble with sleep
    • appetite or weight changes
    • tiredness
    • trouble concentrating
  • Bipolar disorder. Quetiapine is used to treat bipolar disorder in adults and children ages 10 years and older. It may be used alone or with other medications for this condition. Symptoms of bipolar disorder include:
    • mania (a state of emotional excitement, impulsiveness, and increased energy)
    • depression

It’s not clear exactly how quetiapine works for these conditions. But scientists believe the drug improves symptoms of the conditions by changing levels of certain neurotransmitters (brain chemicals). These include the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.

Your doctor can tell you more about the uses, risks, and benefits of quetiapine for your condition.

* Quetiapine ER oral tablets have a boxed warning for this risk. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information about these warnings, see the “What are quetiapine ER oral tablet’s side effects?” section above.

Don’t take more quetiapine ER oral tablets than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects. Take quetiapine exactly as your doctor has prescribed it.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an overdose of quetiapine can include:

An overdose of quetiapine ER oral tablets can also cause a bezoar to form in your stomach. (A bezoar is a solid mass of material that can’t be digested.) A surgical procedure may be necessary to remove a bezoar.

What to do in case you take too much quetiapine

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much quetiapine. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or you can use its online resource. If you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for quetiapine ER oral tablets in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

Financial assistance to help you pay for quetiapine ER oral tablets may be available. Medicine Assistance Tool and NeedyMeds are two websites that provide resources to help reduce the cost of quetiapine ER oral tablets.

These websites also offer tools to help you find low-cost healthcare and certain educational resources. To learn more, visit their websites.

There have been reports of drug misuse with quetiapine, especially misusing it with illegal drugs. With misuse, a drug is taken differently than how it was prescribed.

It’s possible for drugs that work by regulating certain brain chemicals to be misused. (Keep in mind that this is how quetiapine works.)

But it’s important to take quetiapine exactly as your doctor has prescribed it for your condition. Taking it differently can cause serious side effects or lead to worsening of your condition. Before taking quetiapine, tell your doctor if you’ve ever experienced substance misuse or had substance use disorder.

Your doctor will monitor you carefully while you’re taking quetiapine. This way, they can make sure the drug is working for you, and they can watch to see if you develop tolerance to the drug. In some cases, your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of quetiapine.

With tolerance, your body stops responding to a normal dose of a drug and you need more of the drug to have the desired effect. But, tolerance doesn’t mean you’re addicted to a drug or have cravings for it. (With addiction, a drug is taken even if it’s causing harm. You may also have intense cravings for the drug.)

Don’t change your dosage of quetiapine on your own or take the drug differently than how it was prescribed. If you feel that quetiapine isn’t working for you, talk with your doctor about your concerns.

Many treatment options are available for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. Quetiapine ER oral tablets are one option your doctor may discuss with you.

To learn more about how quetiapine works for these conditions, see the “What is quetiapine ER oral tablet used for?” section above.

Before starting treatment with quetiapine, ask your doctor about the benefits and risks of using this drug. Here are a few questions to get you started:

  • What over-the-counter vitamins and supplements are safe to take with quetiapine?
  • What should I know about alternatives of quetiapine, such as olanzapine?
  • How long will I need to take quetiapine?

Additionally, you can read these Healthline articles to learn more about your condition:

You can also sign up for Healthline’s newsletter about depression and bipolar disorder to learn more about these conditions.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.