If you have heavy periods, your doctor may discuss Oriahnn with you.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used to treat heavy periods caused by fibroids in the uterus. (Fibroids are noncancerous growths.) This drug is prescribed for adult females* who haven’t yet gone through menopause.

To learn more about how Oriahnn is used, see the “What is Oriahnn used for?” section below.

It’s important to note that Oriahnn isn’t recommended for use longer than 24 months. This is because the drug may cause bone loss that can’t be reversed. See the “What are Oriahnn’s side effects?” section below for more information.

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Oriahnn basics

Oriahnn comes as capsules you’ll swallow. You’ll take one type of capsule in the morning and one type at night.

Oriahnn contains the active drug elagolix and two hormones:

This medication is only available as the brand-name drug Oriahnn. It doesn’t come in a generic version.

Read on to learn about Oriahnn’s side effects, cost, how it’s taken, and more.

Like most drugs, Oriahnn may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Oriahnn may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Oriahnn. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Oriahnn can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Oriahnn’s medication guide.

Mild side effects of Oriahnn that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Oriahnn can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Oriahnn, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Oriahnn that have been reported include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

SUICIDE PREVENTION

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Oriahnn may cause.

Boxed warning

Oriahnn has a boxed warning about increasing the risk of blood clots and certain blood vessel problems. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The drug’s boxed warning is described below.

Blood clots and certain blood vessel problems. Taking hormone therapy with estrogen and progestin may increase the risk of blood clots. Oriahnn is this type of therapy.

Examples of blood clots that may occur include pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in your lung) and deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in certain veins in your body). Other blood vessel problems, such as stroke and heart attack, may also occur with Oriahnn.

Certain people may have an increased risk for these side effects. This includes females* older than 35 years of age who smoke. It also includes females with health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure that’s not controlled, high cholesterol, or obesity. And it includes females who’ve had a blood clot or blood vessel problem in the past.

Symptoms of a blood clot can vary based on the location of the clot. But they may include:

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

What might help

Be sure to discuss with your doctor your health history and any medical conditions you have. Also, tell your doctor if you smoke or if any family members have had stroke, heart attack, or other blood vessel problems.

Your doctor can let you know if your risk for serious side effects, such as blood clots, is increased. They’ll recommend if it’s safe for you to take Oriahnn.

Call your doctor right away if you have any symptoms of blood clots while you’re taking Oriahnn. But call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening.

Weight gain

Oriahnn may cause weight gain. But this is a less common side effect of the drug.

Whether or not you’ll gain weight with Oriahnn can depend on:

  • your genetics and lifestyle
  • other medications you’re taking
  • how long you’ve been taking Oriahnn

What might help

If you have weight gain while you’re taking Oriahnn, talk with your doctor. They may offer suggestions to help you manage a healthy body weight.

Don’t stop taking Oriahnn on your own if you’re concerned about weight gain. Instead, ask your doctor for more information about this side effect.

Bone loss

Taking Oriahnn can cause bone loss.

With bone loss, your bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced. BMD describes the strength of your bones. Changes in BMD have happened in people taking this drug.

The risk of bone loss with Oriahnn is higher if you take the drug for more than 24 months and if you have other risk factors. Because of this, Oriahnn isn’t recommended for use longer than 24 months.

Other risk factors of bone loss include:

What might help

Before you start taking Oriahnn, your doctor may order a test called a DEXA scan. This test is used to check your BMD. Your doctor will also monitor your bone density while you’re taking this drug.

Your doctor may suggest ways to improve your bone health. These could include taking vitamin D and calcium supplements while you’re taking Oriahnn.

If you have significant risk factors for bone loss, your doctor may suggest another treatment instead of Oriahnn for your condition.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Oriahnn or one of its inactive ingredients. These include the artificial food coloring called yellow 5.

If you’re allergic to yellow 5 or any other ingredients in Oriahnn, tell your doctor before starting this drug. See the “What should be considered before taking Oriahnn?” section below for more information about this.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Oriahnn. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Oriahnn in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Oriahnn manufacturer’s website to see if they have support options.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about Oriahnn.

What should I know about Oriahnn vs. Orilissa or other alternatives?

Oriahnn and Orilissa are both brand-name drugs used to treat certain conditions affecting the female reproductive system.* These drugs have some similarities and some differences.

Oriahnn is used to manage heavy periods from uterine fibroids. (Fibroids are noncancerous growths.) Orilissa, on the other hand, is used to manage symptoms of endometriosis. (Endometriosis is a condition that causes growth of uterine tissue outside of the uterus.)

Both Oriahnn and Orilissa contain the drug elagolix, but Oriahnn also contains estradiol and progestin. So, Oriahnn and Orilissa may share some of the same side effects. But they have some differing side effects, too. Both drugs also have some similar serious warnings.

Oriahnn comes as capsules and Orilissa comes as tablets. Oriahnn is taken twice each day. Orilissa may be taken once or twice each day.

Alternative medications are also available to treat heavy periods from fibroids and endometriosis. Some examples include:

Ask your doctor about which drug is right for your condition. You can also look at Oriahnn and Orilissa’s medication guide to learn more about these two options.

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

How does Oriahnn work?

Oriahnn works to treat heavy periods caused by uterine fibroids. (Fibroids are noncancerous growths.) How the drug works is known as its mechanism of action.

Oriahnn has three active ingredients:

To learn more about how Oriahnn is used, see the “What is Oriahnn used for?” section below. If you have questions about how Oriahnn works for your condition, ask your doctor for more information.

Is Oriahnn used to treat uterine fibroids?

No, Oriahnn doesn’t treat uterine fibroids themselves. Instead, Oriahnn is used to treat heavy periods caused by fibroids.

Fibroids are noncancerous growths that can cause painful periods or heavy menstrual bleeding. Oriahnn helps reduce certain hormone levels, leading to lighter periods. But Oriahnn won’t make fibroids disappear. So if you stop taking Oriahnn, your heavy bleeding may come back.

Keep in mind that Oriahnn is not recommended for use more than 24 months. This is because the drug can cause bone loss, which may increase your risk for bone fractures. It’s not known if you can start taking Oriahnn after you’ve stopped taking it for a while.

If you’d like to know about treatment options for uterine fibroids, talk with your doctor.

Can Oriahnn be used with birth control?

Yes, it can. But it should only be used with nonhormonal birth control. Examples of nonhormonal birth control methods include condoms and diaphragms.

It’s unclear if it’s safe to use hormonal birth control together with Oriahnn. Doing so may make Oriahnn less effective.

Keep in mind that Oriahnn isn’t safe to take during pregnancy. This is why it’s important to use an effective nonhormonal form of birth control to help prevent pregnancy for as long as you’re taking Oriahnn. You should keep using birth control for at least 1 week after you stop taking Oriahnn.

If you’re taking hormonal birth control, be sure to let your doctor know before you start using Oriahnn. Discuss with your doctor other effective forms of birth control to use with Oriahnn.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Oriahnn. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking Oriahnn

Oriahnn comes as capsules you’ll swallow. You’ll take one type of capsule in the morning and one type at night.

Packages of the drug each hold a week’s supply of capsules. And there are four packages in each carton of Oriahnn.

Oriahnn contains the active drug elagolix and two hormones:

Each morning capsule of Oriahnn is white and yellow in color and contains:

  • elagolix
  • estradiol
  • norethindrone acetate

Each evening capsule is white and blue in color, and contains only elagolix.

Dosage

Oriahnn is usually taken twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening.

Questions about taking Oriahnn

Here’s a list of common questions related to taking Oriahnn.

  • What if I miss a dose of Oriahnn? If you miss a dose of Oriahnn, either in the morning or evening, take it as soon as you remember as long as it’s within 4 hours of your scheduled dose. If it’s been longer than 4 hours, skip the missed dose and just take your next scheduled dose. Don’t take two doses of Oriahnn to catch up on a missed dose. Doing so can increase your risk for serious side effects.
  • Will I need to use Oriahnn long term? Oriahnn isn’t recommended for use longer than 24 months. This is because the drug increases the risk of bone loss, which can increase your risk for bone fractures. Talk with your doctor about how long you should take this drug.
  • Can Oriahnn be chewed, crushed, or split? No, you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew Oriahnn capsules. It’s not known if this can change how the drug works. If you have trouble swallowing pills, ask your doctor for suggestions. You can also try these tips to help you swallow pills more easily.
  • Should I take Oriahnn with food? Food doesn’t change how Oriahnn works. So, you can take the drug either with or without food.
  • How long does Oriahnn take to work? It may take up to 1 month for Oriahnn to reduce your symptoms. Ask your doctor what you can anticipate with treatment and when you can expect to have lighter periods.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Oriahnn and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will Oriahnn affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

If you have heavy periods, your doctor may talk with you about Oriahnn.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used to treat heavy menstrual bleeding that’s caused by fibroids in the uterus. (Fibroids are noncancerous growths.) This drug is prescribed for adult females* who haven’t yet gone through menopause.

Fibroids can cause you to have heavy bleeding with your periods. It’s not known for sure why this happens.

Oriahnn works to lower certain hormone levels in your body. This way, the lining inside your uterus doesn’t grow as thick as usual. This leads to a lighter flow during your periods.

It’s important to note that Oriahnn isn’t recommended for use longer than 24 months. This is because the drug may cause bone loss that can’t be reversed. See the “What are Oriahnn’s side effects?” section above for more information.

Ask your doctor for more information about using Oriahnn for heavy periods caused by fibroids.

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Before taking Oriahnn, tell your doctor about all your health conditions and medications.

These and other factors to consider are discussed below.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Oriahnn, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Oriahnn.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Oriahnn can interact with several types of drugs. In some cases, your doctor may need to adjust the doses of your medications to help you avoid side effects if you’re taking the medications with Oriahnn.

Examples of drugs that may interact with Oriahnn include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with Oriahnn. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of Oriahnn.

Other interactions

Don’t drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit while you’re taking Oriahnn. Doing so can increase the level of Oriahnn in your body. This can increase your risk for side effects of the drug.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information about this interaction.

Boxed warning

Oriahnn has a boxed warning about increasing the risk of blood clots and certain blood vessel problems. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Taking hormone therapy with estrogen and progestin may increase the risk of blood clots. Oriahnn is this type of therapy.

Examples of blood clots that may occur include pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in your lung) and deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in certain veins in your body). Other blood vessel problems, such as stroke and heart attack may also occur with Oriahnn.

Certain people may have an increased risk for these side effects. This includes females* older than 35 years of age who smoke. It also includes females with health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure that’s not controlled, high cholesterol, or obesity. And it includes females who’ve had a blood clot or blood vessel problem in the past.

For more information about these warnings, see the “What are Oriahnn’s side effects?” section above.

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Other warnings

In certain situations, Oriahnn has contraindications (warnings against its use). The drug may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Oriahnn.

Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • History of blood clots or blood vessel disease. Oriahnn is contraindicated in females* who’ve had blood clots or blood vessel diseases, such as heart attack or stroke. It’s also contraindicated in females who are at high risk for blood clots or blood vessel disorders. See the boxed warnings section just above for more information.
  • Osteoporosis. If you have osteoporosis (a condition that causes weakened bones), taking Oriahnn can make your bones even weaker. Oriahnn is contraindicated in people with osteoporosis. Your doctor will check your bone mineral density before you start treatment with Oriahnn. (Bone mineral density describes the strength of your bones.) They’ll recommend if it’s safe for you to take this drug.
  • Hormone-sensitive cancer. You should not take Oriahnn if you have or have had breast cancer. You also shouldn’t take this drug if you’re at risk for hormone-related cancers, such as those with BRCA gene mutations. Tell your doctor if you’ve ever had cancer before starting Oriahnn.
  • Suicidal thoughts or behavior. Tell your doctor if you’ve ever had a mental health condition, including suicidal thoughts or actions, depression, or other mood disorders. Oriahnn may not be right for you if you have these conditions.
  • Migraine. If you’re 35 years of age or older and have had migraine with aura or other headaches, Oriahnn may not be right for you. This drug increases the risk of blood clots, stroke, and heart attack. And your risk is increased if you have headaches or migraine. Your doctor can discuss other treatment options that are safer for you.
  • Liver problems. Oriahnn is contraindicated for use in people with serious liver disease. Taking the drug may worsen liver conditions. If you have liver problems, talk with your doctor. They can tell you if it’s safe for you to take Oriahnn.
  • Allergic reaction, including to aspirin or yellow 5. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Oriahnn or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Oriahnn. This includes an allergy to the food coloring called yellow 5, which Oriahnn contains. Some people who are allergic to aspirin are also allergic to this dye. If you’re allergic to aspirin or yellow 5, tell your doctor. Oriahnn may not be safe for you to take. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Undiagnosed uterine bleeding. Oriahnn is contraindicated in people with abnormal uterine bleeding that has an unknown cause. If you have abnormal bleeding, your doctor will need to determine the cause of your bleeding before you can start taking Oriahnn. In some people, abnormal bleeding may be due to cancer.

* In this article, the term “female” refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Oriahnn and alcohol

There’s no known interaction between alcohol and Oriahnn. But drinking alcohol while you take Oriahnn may increase certain side effects of the drug. These could include hot flashes and the risk of blood clots, for example.

If you’d like, ask your doctor for more information about this. They can tell you if it’s safe for you to drink alcohol and how much is safe to drink with Oriahnn.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Oriahnn may cause miscarriage if it’s taken during pregnancy. Because of this, the drug isn’t safe to use while you’re pregnant, especially during the first few months of pregnancy.

Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while you’re taking Oriahnn. And ask your doctor about birth control options to help prevent pregnancy while you’re taking this drug.

To help prevent pregnancy, you’ll need to use a nonhormonal birth control method while you’re taking Oriahnn. And you should keep using birth control for at least 1 week after you stop taking the drug. For more information about this, see “Can Oriahnn be used with birth control?” in the “What are some frequently asked questions about Oriahnn?” section above.

Keep in mind that Oriahnn can cause irregular or light periods. This can make it tough to tell if you’re pregnant. Watch for early pregnancy symptoms, such as nausea, weight gain, and breast tenderness. Tell your doctor right away if you think you may be pregnant.

If you do take Oriahnn during pregnancy, you can sign up for the drug’s pregnancy registry by calling 833-782-7241. Your doctor can provide more information about this registry.

It’s not known if Oriahnn passes into breast milk or if it’s safe for a child who’s breastfed. Ask your doctor for more information about taking Oriahnn while breastfeeding.

Don’t take more Oriahnn than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an Oriahnn overdose can include:

What to do in case you take too much Oriahnn

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Oriahnn. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

If you’re having heavy periods caused by uterine fibroids, your doctor may discuss Oriahnn with you. (Fibroids are noncancerous growths.)

A few questions you might consider asking your doctor include:

  • Will Oriahnn cure my fibroids?
  • Can I take Oriahnn again if I stop taking it and have problems with fibroids later on?
  • What alternatives treatments are available for my heavy periods?

You can read more about treatment options for fibroids and heavy menstrual bleeding. You can also check out these ways to help stop heavy periods.

Additionally, you can sign up for Healthline’s women’s wellness newsletter here. Through this newsletter, you may learn more about your condition and its treatment options.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.