Nexletol (bempedoic acid) is a prescription drug that’s taken to treat high cholesterol. This drug can interact with other medications. For example, Nexletol can interact with simvastatin (FloLipid, Zocor) and pravastatin.

Nexletol is taken to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with either of the following conditions:

For this use, doctors prescribe Nexletol with a statin drug and a diet that’s low in cholesterol.

Nexletol comes as a tablet that you swallow. Its active ingredient (what makes a drug work) is bempedoic acid.

An interaction can occur because one substance causes another substance to have a different effect than expected. Interactions also can occur if you have certain health conditions.

Keep reading to learn about Nexletol’s possible interactions. And for more information about Nexletol, including details about its uses, see this article.

Before you start taking Nexletol, tell your doctor and pharmacist about any prescription, over-the-counter, or other drugs you take. Sharing this information with them may help prevent possible interactions. (To learn whether Nexletol interacts with herbs or vitamins and supplements, see the “Are there other interactions with Nexletol?” section below.)

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The table below lists drugs that may interact with Nexletol. Keep in mind that this table does not include all drugs that may interact with Nexletol. For more information about these interactions, see the “Drug interactions explained” section below.

Drug groupDrug examplesWhat can happen
certain statinssimvastatin (FloLipid, Zocor)
pravastatin
can increase the risk of muscle problems as a side effect of statins
fluoroquinolone antibiotics• ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
levofloxacin
moxifloxacin
• ofloxacin
can increase the risk of tendon damage as a side effect of Nexletol* or fluoroquinolones
corticosteroidsprednisone (Rayos, Deltasone)
dexamethasone (Hemady, Decadron, DexPak)
methylprednisolone (Medrol)
can increase the risk of tendon damage as a side effect of Nexletol* or corticosteroids

* To learn more about Nexletol’s side effects, see this article.

Nexletol is not known to interact with alcohol. But Nexletol can cause high liver enzyme levels, which could indicate liver damage.

Drinking five or more beverages containing alcohol per day substantially increases the risk of liver damage. So during Nexletol treatment, drinking that much alcohol could make you more likely to have liver damage.

If you have questions about consuming alcohol while taking Nexletol, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Learn more about certain drug interactions that can occur with Nexletol.

Interaction with certain statins

Nexletol can interact with certain statins. Like Nexletol, statins treat high cholesterol.

The specific statins that may interact with Nexletol include simvastatin (FloLipid, Zocor) and pravastatin.

What could happen

Taking Nexletol with certain statins may cause your body to break down the statin too slowly. This can raise the level of the statin drug in your body. In turn, this high level could increase your risk of muscle problems as a side effect of the statin.

What you can do

If you take Nexletol with certain statins, your doctor will likely prescribe a reduced dosage of the statin. Doing so will help reduce your risk of muscle problems as a side effect. You should not take a dose of either medication that’s higher than your doctor prescribes.

If you have questions about taking Nexletol with certain statins, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Interaction with fluoroquinolone antibiotics

Nexletol can interact with certain fluoroquinolones. These are antibiotics prescribed to treat certain infections caused by bacteria.

Examples of fluoroquinolones include:

What could happen

Nexletol and fluoroquinolones both can cause tendon damage as a side effect. So taking these drugs together can raise this risk further.

What you can do

Before taking any antibiotic, be sure the doctor prescribing it knows you’re taking Nexletol. They can determine whether it’s safe to take specific antibiotics with this drug.

If you take Nexletol with a fluoroquinolone, tell your doctor right away if you have tendon damage symptoms. These may include swelling or severe pain around a joint. If you have these symptoms, your doctor can advise whether it’s safe to keep taking these medications together. They can also recommend whether treatment for the tendon damage is needed.

If you have questions about taking Nexletol with fluoroquinolones, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Interaction with corticosteroids

Nexletol can interact with corticosteroids. These medications are prescribed to treat conditions involving inflammation (swelling).

Examples of corticosteroids include:

What could happen

Nexletol and corticosteroids can cause tendon damage as a side effect. Taking these medications together can increase this risk further.

What you can do

Before taking any corticosteroid, be sure the doctor prescribing it knows you’re taking Nexletol. They can determine whether it’s safe to take these medications together.

If you take a corticosteroid with Nexletol, tell your doctor right away if you have tendon damage symptoms. These may include severe pain or swelling near a joint. If you have these symptoms, your doctor can advise whether it’s safe to continue taking these drugs together. They can also recommend whether treatment for the tendon damage is needed.

If you have questions about taking Nexletol with corticosteroids, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Nexletol may have other interactions. They could occur with supplements, foods, vaccines, or even lab tests. See below for details. Note that the information below does not include all other possible interactions with Nexletol.

Does Nexletol interact with supplements?

Before you start taking Nexletol, talk with your doctor and pharmacist about any herbs or vitamins and supplements you take. Sharing this information with them may help you avoid possible interactions.

If you have questions about interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Nexletol and herbs

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with herbs. But this doesn’t mean that interactions with herbs won’t be recognized in the future.

For this reason, it’s still important to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products while taking Nexletol.

Nexletol and vitamins

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with vitamins. But this doesn’t mean that interactions with vitamins won’t be recognized in the future.

For this reason, it’s still important to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products while taking Nexletol.

Does Nexletol interact with food?

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with food. If you have questions about eating certain foods during your treatment with Nexletol, talk with your doctor.

Does Nexletol interact with vaccines?

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with vaccines. If you have questions about getting certain vaccines during your Nexletol treatment, talk with your doctor.

Does Nexletol interact with lab tests?

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with lab tests. If you have questions about having certain lab tests during your treatment with Nexletol, talk with the healthcare professional ordering the test.

Does Nexletol interact with cannabis or CBD?

Nexletol currently has no reports of interactions with cannabis (commonly called marijuana) or cannabis products such as cannabidiol (CBD). But as with any drug or supplement, talk with your doctor before using cannabis with Nexletol.

Note: Cannabis is illegal at a federal level but is legal in many states to varying degrees.

Certain medical conditions or other health factors may raise the risk of interactions with Nexletol. Before taking Nexletol, talk with your doctor about your health history. They’ll determine whether Nexletol is right for you.

Health conditions or other factors that might interact with Nexletol include:

Tendon damage or factors that increase the risk of it: Nexletol may cause tendon damage as a side effect, which may include the tearing of tendon tissue. Certain factors could increase this risk. These include having tendon damage in the past, having kidney failure, or being over age 60 years old.

If any of these factors apply to you, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Nexletol. They’ll recommend alternative treatments instead.

Gout or a high blood level of uric acid: Before taking Nexletol, tell your doctor if you have gout or a high blood level of uric acid. Nexletol may cause high uric acid as a side effect, which could lead to gout. If you already have gout or high uric acid, Nexletol could worsen either condition.

Your doctor can recommend whether Nexletol is a safe treatment option for you.

Severe liver or kidney problems: It isn’t known for certain whether Nexletol is safe for people who have severe liver or kidney problems. If you have either, talk with your doctor before starting Nexletol treatment. They can tell you whether Nexletol is the right treatment option for you.

Pregnancy: Nexletol may not be safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor before taking Nexletol.

Breastfeeding: It’s not known whether it’s safe to take Nexletol while breastfeeding. It’s possible that the drug may pass into breast milk and cause side effects in a child who’s breastfed. To be safe, your doctor may advise you not to breastfeed during Nexletol treatment.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about your options.

Allergic reaction: If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Nexletol or any of its ingredients, your doctor likely won’t prescribe Nexletol. This is because taking the drug could cause another allergic reaction. You can ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better choices for you.

Taking certain steps can help you avoid interactions with Nexletol. Before starting treatment, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Things to discuss with them include:

  • Whether you drink alcohol or use cannabis.
  • Other medications and herbs you take, as well as any vitamins and supplements. Your doctor or pharmacist can help you fill out a medication list.
  • What to do if you start taking a new drug during your Nexletol treatment.

It’s also important to understand Nexletol’s label and other paperwork that may come with the drug. Colored stickers that describe interactions may be on the label. And the paperwork (sometimes called the patient package insert or medication guide) may have other details about interactions. If you did not get paperwork with Nexletol, ask your pharmacist to print a copy for you.

If you have difficulty reading or understanding this information, your doctor or pharmacist can help.

Taking Nexletol exactly as prescribed can also help prevent interactions.

If you still have questions about Nexletol and its possible interactions, talk with your doctor.

Questions you may want to ask your doctor include:

  • Should I tell you if I stop any medications or start any new ones while I’m taking Nexletol?
  • Does my Nexletol dosage affect my risk of interactions?
  • Do other treatments for lowering cholesterol have interactions similar to Nexletol?

To learn more about Nexletol, see these articles:

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.