If you’re considering treatment options for hepatitis C, your doctor may suggest Mavyret. Hepatitis C is an infection that’s caused by the hepatitis C virus. It leads to inflammation of your liver.

Mavyret is a prescription drug that’s used in certain adults and children to treat hepatitis C.

To learn more about hepatitis C and how Mavyret is used to treat it, see the “Is Mavyret used for hepatitis C?” section below.

Mavyret basics

Mavyret is an antiviral medication that contains two active ingredients: glecaprevir and pibrentasvir. It isn’t available in a generic form.

Mavyret comes as tablets and pellets. Each form is swallowed.

Read on to learn more about how Mavyret works, its uses, its side effects, and more.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Mavyret manufacturer’s website to learn what cost-saving options it offers.

Like most drugs, Mavyret may cause mild or serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that Mavyret may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of Mavyret. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Mavyret can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Mavyret’s patient information.

Mild side effects that have been reported with Mavyret include:

  • nausea
  • headache
  • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • diarrhea
  • high levels of bilirubin (a yellowish substance produced when blood cells break down)

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Mavyret can occur, but they aren’t common.

If you have serious side effects from Mavyret, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects* that have been reported with Mavyret include:

* For more information on these side effects, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects Mavyret may cause.

Boxed warning

Mavyret has a boxed warning for the risk of hepatitis B reactivation. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. If you have both hepatitis C and HBV, or have had a hepatitis B infection in the past, Mavyret treatment may cause HBV reactivation.

Hepatitis B infection is caused by the hepatitis B virus. With reactivation, an inactive virus that’s inside your body flares up and causes symptoms. In some cases, HBV reactivation could cause liver failure and, in some serious cases, death.

Your doctor will monitor you for signs of HBV reactivation during and after treatment with Mavyret. If you’re concerned about your risk of this side effect with the use of Mavyret, talk with your doctor.

Symptoms of hepatitis B include:

  • pain in the upper-right side of your belly
  • dark-colored urine
  • tiredness
  • fever
  • loss of appetite
  • jaundice (yellowish color of your skin or the whites of your eyes)

What might help

Your doctor will order a blood test to see if you have HBV before you start treatment with Mavyret.

If you have hepatitis B, you’ll likely receive treatment for HBV before you start taking Mavyret. Studies show that treatment for HBV helps prevent reactivation in people at risk for it.

If you’re having symptoms of hepatitis B infection, your doctor may order blood tests to check for reactivation. If you do have this condition, you’ll need treatment for HBV. In some cases, Mavyret may not be safe for you to take.

If you’d like, ask your doctor for more information about HBV reactivation with Mavyret.

Itching

You may have itchy skin while you’re taking Mavyret. In studies, this was a common side effect in people with chronic (long-lasting) kidney disease.

Keep in mind that itching is also a common side effect of liver disorders, including hepatitis C, which Mavyret is used to treat. Itching can also be caused by increases in your body’s bilirubin levels, which is a possible side effect of Mavyret. (Bilirubin is a yellowish substance produced when blood cells break down.)

What might help

If your skin is itchy while you’re taking Mavyret, talk with your doctor. They may order blood tests to check the condition of your liver.

Your doctor can also recommend treatment for the itching. If your itching is mild, these remedies may help relieve your discomfort. But always check with your doctor before using any new medications with Mavyret.

Side effects after stopping Mavyret

It’s possible to have side effects after stopping Mavyret treatment. But these likely aren’t caused by the drug itself.

Some people with cirrhosis (scarring in the liver) due to hepatitis C may have long-lasting symptoms of the condition, such as:

  • jaundice (yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes)
  • feeling confused, tired, or weak
  • nausea and vomiting
  • liver pain, which you may feel in the upper-right side of your belly
  • bleeding or bruising more easily than usual
  • bloating or swelling caused by fluid buildup in your belly
  • itchy skin

In addition, if you’ve had hepatitis B in the past, Mavyret may cause a reactivation (flare-up) of the virus. Your doctor will monitor you for signs of hepatitis B virus reactivation during treatment. And they’ll continue to monitor you after you’ve completed treatment with Mavyret. For more information about this, see the section above called “Boxed warning.”

What might help

Your doctor will monitor your liver function with blood tests while you’re taking Mavyret and after you finish treatment.

Tell your doctor if you’ve had hepatitis B or serious liver problems in the past. If you develop hepatitis B reactivation, it will need to be treated. Ask your doctor about treatment for this condition.

Your doctor will order a blood test to see if you have HBV before you start treatment with Mavyret.

If you have hepatitis B, you’ll likely receive treatment for HBV before you start taking Mavyret. Studies show that treatment for HBV helps prevent reactivation in people at risk for it.

If you’re having symptoms of hepatitis B infection, your doctor may order blood tests to check for reactivation. If you do have this condition, you’ll need treatment for HBV. In some cases, Mavyret may not be safe for you to take.

If you’d like, ask your doctor for more information about HBV reactivation with Mavyret.

Itching

You may have itchy skin while you’re taking Mavyret. In studies, this was a common side effect in people with chronic (long-lasting) kidney disease.

Keep in mind that itching is also a common side effect of liver disorders, including hepatitis C, which Mavyret is used to treat. Itching can also be caused by increases in your body’s bilirubin levels, which is a possible side effect of Mavyret. (Bilirubin is a yellowish substance produced when blood cells break down.)

What might help

If your skin is itchy while you’re taking Mavyret, talk with your doctor. They may order blood tests to check the condition of your liver.

Your doctor can also recommend treatment for the itching. If your itching is mild, these remedies may help relieve your discomfort. But always check with your doctor before using any new medications with Mavyret.

Side effects after stopping Mavyret

It’s possible to have side effects after stopping Mavyret treatment. But these likely aren’t caused by the drug itself.

Some people with cirrhosis (scarring in the liver) due to hepatitis C may have long-lasting symptoms of the condition, such as:

  • jaundice (yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes)
  • feeling confused, tired, or weak
  • nausea and vomiting
  • liver pain, which you may feel in the upper-right side of your belly
  • bleeding or bruising more easily than usual
  • bloating or swelling caused by fluid buildup in your belly
  • itchy skin

In addition, if you’ve had hepatitis B in the past, Mavyret may cause a reactivation (flare-up) of the virus. Your doctor will monitor you for signs of hepatitis B virus reactivation during treatment. And they’ll continue to monitor you after you’ve completed treatment with Mavyret. For more information about this, see the section above called “Boxed warning.”

What might help

Your doctor will monitor your liver function with blood tests while you’re taking Mavyret and after you finish treatment.

Tell your doctor if you’ve had hepatitis B or serious liver problems in the past. If you develop hepatitis B reactivation, it will need to be treated. Ask your doctor about treatment for this condition.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Mavyret. This side effect wasn’t reported in studies, but it can still occur.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Mavyret. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Mavyret that’s right for you. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Forms and strengths

Mavyret comes as a tablet and pellets. Both forms of the drug are swallowed. Each form of Mavyret contains two active drugs, and comes in one strength:

  • Mavyret tablets: 100 milligrams (mg) of glecaprevir and 40 mg of pibrentasvir
  • Mavyret pellets: 50 mg of glecaprevir and 20 mg of pibrentasvir

Recommended dosage

The recommended Mavyret dosage for hepatitis C in adults and children ages 12 years and older is three tablets taken once per day.

For children ages 3 years to 12 years, your child’s doctor will determine Mavyret’s dosage based on your child’s body weight.

Typically, the following dosing schedules are followed with Mavyret:

  • If you’ve never been treated for hepatitis C, and you either don’t have cirrhosis (liver scarring) or you have compensated cirrhosis (a milder form), you’ll likely take Mavyret for 8 weeks.
  • If you have hepatitis C that has been treated in the past with another medication that didn’t work for you, you might take Mavyret for 8, 12, or 16 weeks. Your doctor will decide the length of your treatment.

Questions about Mavyret’s dosage

Below are some common questions about Mavyret’s dosage.

  • What if I miss a dose of Mavyret? If you miss a dose of Mavyret, you can take the missed dose if fewer than 18 hours have passed since you were scheduled to take it. If more than 18 hours have passed, skip that dose and take your next dose at its regularly scheduled time. It’s important to take Mavyret at the same time each day. Missing doses might affect how well Mavyret works to treat your hepatitis C. To help you stay on track with your treatment, consider setting a daily alarm or downloading a reminder app on your phone. If you have questions about a missed dose, check with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Will I need to use Mavyret long term? Your doctor will decide how long to continue your treatment with Mavyret. Treatment typically lasts for 8, 12, or 16 weeks. The treatment duration (how long you take the drug) of Mavyret depends on:
    • the condition of your liver if you have cirrhosis
    • if you’ve been treated for hepatitis C in the past
    • how you respond to treatment
    • side effects you experience
  • How long does Mavyret take to work? Studies show Mavyret cures hepatitis C in most people within 8 to 16 weeks when it’s taken as directed. After that time period, your doctor will order blood tests to see if you still have hepatitis C. You’ll need to have a sustained virologic response 12 weeks or more after treatment. This will mean that the virus is no longer seen in your blood and that the Mavyret treatment has worked. Your doctor will decide how long you will take Mavyret.

Your doctor will explain how you should take Mavyret. They’ll also explain how much to take and how often.

Taking Mavyret

Mavyret comes as a tablet and as pellets in a packet. Take your prescribed dose at about the same time each day. You should swallow the tablets and the pellets whole, without chewing.

It’s important to continue taking Mavyret for as long as prescribed, to ensure you get the best results from your treatment.

Accessible medication containers and labels

If it’s hard for you to read the label on your prescription, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Certain pharmacies may provide medication labels that:

  • have large print
  • use braille
  • contain a code you can scan with a smartphone to change the text into audio

Your doctor or pharmacist may be able to recommend a pharmacy that offers these options if your current pharmacy doesn’t.

Also, if you’re having trouble opening your medication bottles, let your pharmacist know. They may be able to put Mavyret in an easy-open container. Your pharmacist may also recommend tools to help make it simpler to open the drug’s container.

Questions about taking Mavyret

Following are some commonly asked questions about taking Mavyret.

  • Can Mavyret be chewed, crushed, or split? No. Do not chew, crush, or split Mavyret tablets or pellets. This may change how well the drug works to treat hepatitis C. If you have trouble swallowing pills, you doctor will likely prescribe Mavyret pellets instead. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for help with swallowing Mavyret if you have trouble. You can also try these tips for swallowing pills.
  • Should I take Mavyret with food? Yes, Mavyret works best when taken with food. Try to take it with the same meal every day to help you remember to stay on schedule.
  • Is there a best time of day to take Mavyret? No, there’s no best time of day to take Mavyret. But you should take it at the same time every day. Doing so will help you to avoid missing doses.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about Mavyret and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions like:
    • How will Mavyret affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

If you’re considering treatment options for hepatitis C, your doctor may suggest Mavyret. Hepatitis C is an infection that’s caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It leads to inflammation of your liver.

Mavyret is prescribed for use in adults and children ages 3 years and older. The drug works to cure HCV by stopping the virus from multiplying (making more virus). HCV is considered cured when the virus can no longer be seen on certain blood tests.

Symptoms of hepatitis C infection include:

  • nausea
  • fever
  • joint pain
  • loss of appetite
  • jaundice (yellowish color of your skin or the white of your eyes)
  • dark-colored urine

There are several genotypes (strains) of chronic (long-lasting) HCV. Mavyret can be used to treat genotypes 1 to 6 in certain people. This includes people who:

Mavyret can also be used to treat genotype 1 HCV in people who have been treated with another certain type of medication that didn’t work.

If you have questions about whether Mavyret treatment is right for you, ask your doctor.

Mavyret and Epclusa are both combination antiviral medications used to treat hepatitis C. They each contain different active ingredients that work in similar ways to stop hepatitis C from multiplying (making more virus). To learn more about how these medications compare, see this article.

Find answers below to some commonly asked questions about Mavyret.

How long does Mavyret stay in your system?

Mavyret contains two different active ingredients: glecaprevir and pibrentasvir. These two drugs stay in your body for different lengths of time.

It takes about 6 hours for half a dose of glecaprevir to be cleared from your body. And it takes about 13 hours for half a dose of pibrentasvir to be cleared from your body.

For this reason, the timing of when you take a dose of Mavyret matters. For instance, you shouldn’t take a dose of Mavyret if more than 18 hours have passed since the time you were scheduled to take it. Instead, you should wait until your next regularly scheduled dose is due. If you take two doses of Mavyret too close together, you could have an increased risk for serious side effects.

Does Mavyret cause weight gain or weight loss?

Weight gain and weight loss haven’t been reported as side effects of Mavyret. But liver disease can cause loss of appetite and nausea, which might lead to weight loss. And keep in mind that Mavyret is used to treat hepatitis C, which affects your liver.

In some cases, Mavyret can cause nausea and diarrhea. If these symptoms are serious, they could also lead to weight loss.

Mavyret works best when it’s taken with food. If nausea is a serious concern for you, talk with your doctor. They can suggest if you should take the drug with food. And they may recommend ways to help manage your nausea.

If you have concerns about your body weight while taking Mavyret, let your doctor know.

Some important things to discuss with your doctor when considering Mavyret treatment include:

  • your overall health
  • any medical conditions you may have
  • other medications you may take

Mavyret interacts with several types of medications. Some interactions can make Mavyret less effective, which means it might not cure your hepatitis C. Other interactions can increase side effects from Mavyret or from other drugs you take with Mavyret.

Be sure to let your doctor know about all your health conditions, including liver or kidney problems. Also ask your doctor about all options for hepatitis C treatment and about the benefits of taking Mavyret.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking Mavyret, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take (including prescription and over-the-counter types). Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with Mavyret.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Mavyret can interact with several types of drugs. These drugs include:

  • Some types of antiviral medications for HIV. Taking some types of antiviral medications for HIV with Mavyret can increase your risk for serious side effects from Mavyret. It may also affect how well Mavyret works for you. Mavyret should not be taken with certain antiviral medications, including:
    • atazanavir (Reyataz)
    • efavirenz (Sustiva)
    • ritonavir (Norvir)
  • Carbamazepine. Taking the seizure medication carbamazepine (Tegretol) with Mavyret can lower the amount of Mavyret in your body. This can affect how well Mavyret works to treat your hepatitis C.
  • Blood thinners. Taking certain blood thinners, such as warfarin or dabigatran (Pradaxa), with Mavyret can change how the blood thinner works for you. This can make your blood too thin or thick and increase your risk for certain side effects, such as blood clots or bleeding. Your doctor may need to order frequent blood tests and adjust the dose of your blood thinner to lower your risk for serious side effects.
  • Certain cholesterol medications. Taking Mavyret with some cholesterol medications called statins, such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), could increase your risk for certain side effects from the statin, such as muscle pain. Your doctor can tell you whether the statin is safe to take with Mavyret. If you can take the statin with Mavyret, your doctor may lower your statin dosage and recommend how best to take the two drugs together.
  • Certain birth control medications. Taking some birth control drugs, such as those containing ethinyl estradiol, can increase your liver enzymes. This can make your liver condition worse. Ask your doctor what forms of birth control are safe to use with Mavyret.
  • Rifampin. Taking Mavyret with the antibiotic rifampin can lower Mavyret’s effectiveness. This means the drug might not work as well to treat your hepatitis C. Doctors typically won’t prescribe Mavyret if you’re taking rifampin. Be sure to talk with your doctor about your treatment plan.

This list doesn’t contain all types of drugs that may interact with Mavyret. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that could occur with Mavyret.

Other interactions

You shouldn’t use the herb St. John’s wort while you’re taking Mavyret. If you take St. John’s wort with Mavyret, it can lower the level of Mavyret in your body. This lowers Mavyret’s effectiveness in treating hepatitis C.

If you are taking St. John’s wort and considering treatment with Mavyret, make sure to tell your doctor. They may be able to suggest other options for you that won’t interact with Mavyret.

Boxed warning

Mavyret has a boxed warning about the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

If you have both hepatitis C and HBV or have had HBV in the past, Mavyret treatment may cause HBV reactivation. This can happen even after you’ve finished your Mavyret treatment. With reactivation, a virus that’s inside your body flares up and causes symptoms. In serious cases, reactivation of HBV could cause liver failure and even death.

Before you begin treatment with Mavyret, your doctor will order blood tests to see if you have hepatitis B or have had it in the past. Your doctor will monitor you for signs of hepatitis B reactivation during treatment, and after you complete treatment with Mavyret.

For more information, see the “What are Mavyret’s side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

Mavyret may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Mavyret. Factors to consider include those listed below.

  • Liver disease. If you have moderate to severe liver problems (Child-Pugh class B or C), be sure to tell your doctor. They may order liver function tests before prescribing Mavyret. The drug may not be safe to take if you have advanced liver disease. In such cases, Mavyret could increase your risk of liver failure or death.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Mavyret or any of its ingredients, your doctor won’t prescribe Mavyret. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.

Use with alcohol

There are no known interactions between Mavyret and alcohol. But alcohol can worsen liver conditions, including hepatitis C, which Mavyret is used to treat.

If you have hepatitis C or another liver condition, talk with your doctor about the risks of drinking alcohol.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

It isn’t known if Mavyret is safe to use during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. There isn’t any information on the drug’s effects when used during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Talk with your doctor about the risks of using Mavyret while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Do not take more Mavyret than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

What to do in case you take too much Mavyret

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Mavyret. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

Mavyret is an option for hepatitis C treatment in certain people.

Treatment with Mavyret may only last 8 weeks for some people. This is a shorter treatment course than you would have with some other HCV treatment options. But some people with hepatitis C need to be treated for 12 or 16 weeks.

Before taking Mavyret, talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of the drug. Ask them what you can expect with treatment.

Here are some suggested questions to get you started:

  • What should I know about the risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation with Mavyret?
  • Are there alternative therapies for hepatitis C that I should consider?
  • Will my hepatitis C come back after treatment with Mavyret?
  • What will happen if I take Mavyret on an empty stomach?
  • How long will I need to be treated with Mavyret?

For more information about hepatitis C treatments, check out these articles:

Q:

Can I donate blood after treatment with Mavyret?

Anonymous

A:

No, you won’t be able to donate blood after hepatitis C treatment with Mavyret.

Even after receiving treatment for hepatitis C, you’ll still have hepatitis C antibodies in your system. (Antibodies are immune system proteins that fight off infection and may help prevent you from getting certain diseases a second time. They can also show past infections you’ve had.)

Current regulations in the United States state that blood donors should “be in good health and free from transfusion-transmitted infections.” According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), people who’ve had hepatitis C in the past don’t meet these criteria. And this is regardless of whether the people have hepatitis C infection symptoms.

If you have more questions about blood donation, talk with your doctor.

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.