If you have schizophrenia, your doctor might suggest Invega Trinza as a treatment option for you.

Invega Trinza is a prescription medication that treats schizophrenia in adults. It can be used in people who have had good results using another form of the same drug called Invega Sustenna.

Invega Trinza is the same medication as Invega Sustenna, but you’ll receive doses less often. Invega Trinza is given every 3 months, and Invega Sustenna is given once per month.

The active ingredient in Invega Trinza is paliperidone palmitate. (An active ingredient is what makes a drug work.) It’s part of a group of drugs called atypical antipsychotics.

Invega Trinza is given as an injection into a muscle. You’ll receive doses at your doctor’s office or another healthcare facility every 3 months.

There are other forms of Invega, including a tablet you take by mouth. This article only gives dosage information for Invega Trinza, including strengths and how to take the drug. This article does not cover all the forms of Invega. To learn more about Invega, see this in-depth article.

Note: This chart highlights the basics of Invega Trinza’s dosage. Be sure to read on for more detail. And please keep in mind that this article covers Invega Trinza’s standard dosage schedule, which the drug’s manufacturer provides. But your doctor will give you the dosage that is right for you at your appointment.

Invega Trinza formInvega Trinza strengths
Extended-release injectable suspension273 milligrams (mg) per 0.88 milliliter (mL) solution
410 mg/1.32 mL
546 mg/1.75 mL
819 mg/2.63 mL

Read this section to learn about Invega Trinza’s typical dosage based on information provided by the manufacturer.

What are the forms of Invega Trinza?

Invega Trinza comes as a suspension (a type of liquid mixture) that a doctor or another healthcare professional will administer as an injection into a muscle.

What strengths does Invega Trinza come in?

Invega Trinza comes in the following strengths:

  • 273 milligram (mg) per 0.88 milliliter (mL)
  • 410 mg/1.32 mL
  • 546 mg/1.75 mL
  • 819 mg/2.63 mL

What are the usual dosages of Invega Trinza?

Usually, your doctor will start you on a dosage based on the Invega Sustenna dosage you were taking. They may adjust your dosage over time. They’ll ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

You’ll receive Invega Trinza doses at your doctor’s office or another healthcare facility every 3 months. A doctor or another healthcare professional will inject the drug into the muscle of your upper arm or buttocks.

The information below describes commonly used or recommended dosages.Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

If you’ve been taking the same monthly dose of Invega Sustenna for at least 4 months, your starting dose of Invega Trinza will be based on that dose. Invega Trinza is the same medication as Invega Sustenna, but you’ll receive doses less often. Invega Trinza is given every 3 months, and Invega Sustenna is given once per month.

Typically, your dose will be converted as follows.

Invega Sustenna last doseInvega Trinza first dose
78 mg273 mg
117 mg410 mg
156 mg546 mg
234 mg819 mg

Your doctor can give you the first dose of Invega Trinza on the same day that you would have received Invega Sustenna. If you can’t go in on that specific day, you can receive your dose within a window of 7 days before or after.

You will have appointments every 3 months to get your Invega Trinza injections.

Is Invega Trinza used long term?

Yes, Invega Trinza is usually used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Invega Trinza is safe and effective for you, you will likely use it long term.

Dosage adjustments

If you have kidney problems, you may need a lower dose of Invega Trinza. But in some cases, your doctor may not prescribe this drug, depending on how severe your kidney problems are.

If you need help remembering your Invega Trinza injection appointments, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or downloading a reminder app on your phone.

If you know you’ll need to miss an appointment, let your doctor know right away. They may need to adjust your dose. It’s usually possible to receive your injection of Invega Trinza within a dosing window of 2 weeks before or 2 weeks after your scheduled injection day.

Depending on how long it has been since you missed a dose, your doctor will determine whether you can continue with the same dose or if you need to use Invega Sustenna again before switching back to Invega Trinza.

If you have questions about what your dose will be after missing an appointment to receive Invega Trinza, talk with your doctor.

The dosage of Invega Trinza your doctor prescribes may depend on several factors. These include:

  • the severity of the condition you are using Invega Trinza to treat
  • your age
  • your previous dosage of Invega Sustenna
  • other conditions you may have (see “Dosage adjustments” under “What is Invega Trinza’s dosage?”)

You’ll receive your injection of Invega Trinza at your doctor’s office or another healthcare facility every 3 months. A doctor or another healthcare professional will inject the drug into the muscle of your upper arm or buttocks.

Until you know how the Invega Trinza injection will affect you, it’s a good idea to plan for a ride home from your appointment.

Using more than the prescribed dosage of Invega Trinza can lead to serious side effects. But an overdose of Invega Trinza is unlikely because a doctor or another healthcare professional will administer the correct dose for you.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an overdose can include:

What to do in case you take too much Invega Trinza

Call your doctor right away if you think you’ve taken/used too much Invega Trinza. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, call 911 (or your local emergency number) immediately or go to the nearest emergency room.

The sections above describe the usual dosages provided by the drug’s manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Invega Trinza, they’ll prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

If you have questions or concerns about your current dosage, talk with your doctor. Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask:

  • Do I have to switch back to Invega Sustenna if my dosage changes?
  • Would a lower dose of Invega Trinza make me less likely to have side effects?
  • Will my Invega Trinza dosage change if I start a new medication for schizophrenia?
  • How should I prepare for my Invega Trinza injection appointments?

Q:

Will I take a different dose of Invega Trinza if I’m also taking other medications for my mental health?

Anonymous

A:

It depends. It’s possible that you will take other medications along with Invega Trinza. Each person’s needs are different, so be sure to talk with your doctor about how well your medications are working for you.

Some medications interact with Invega Trinza. For example, a medication called carbamazepine, and an over-the-counter herbal supplement called St. John’s wort both interact with Invega Trinza. It’s more likely that your doctor will advise you to avoid these interactions instead of changing your Invega Trinza dosage.

If you need to adjust your dosage often because of a medical condition, your doctor may prescribe paliperidone (the active drug in Invega Trinza) that you can take by mouth. (Invega Trinza is given as an injection into a muscle.)

If you have questions about your treatment plan, talk with your doctor.

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.