If you have certain inflammatory conditions, your doctor might suggest Dupixent (dupilumab) as a treatment option for you.

Dupixent is a prescription medication used to treat certain cases of:

Dupixent comes as a single-dose prefilled syringe and a single-dose prefilled pen. You may receive your Dupixent injections at your doctor’s office. But in some cases, your doctor may show you how to give yourself Dupixent injections at home. To learn more, see “How is Dupixent used?” below.

This article describes the dosages of Dupixent, including its forms, strengths, and how to take the drug. To learn more about Dupixent, see this in-depth article.

Note: This article covers typical Dupixent dosages from the drug’s manufacturer. But when using Dupixent, always take the dosage that your doctor prescribes.

This section covers common dosage information for Dupixent.

Depending on your situation, you may receive each dose of Dupixent at your doctor’s office, or they may show you how to give yourself injections at home. You can also ask your pharmacist for advice on giving yourself Dupixent injections.

For more information, see “How is Dupixent used?” below.

What are the forms of Dupixent?

Dupixent comes in two forms: a single-dose prefilled syringe with a needle shield and a single-dose prefilled pen. The prefilled pen should only be used in people ages 12 years and older.

Your doctor will help determine which form of Dupixent is best for you.

What strengths does Dupixent come in?

The single-dose prefilled syringe is available in two strengths: 300 milligrams (mg) in 2 milliliters (mL) of solution and 200 mg in 1.14 mL of solution.

The single-dose prefilled pen also comes in two strengths: 300 mg in 2 mL of solution and 200 mg in 1.14 mL of solution.

What are the typical dosages of Dupixent?

The information below describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

For eczema and asthma, your starting dose of Dupixent will be higher than your maintenance (ongoing) dose. This higher starting dose is called a loading dose. You will usually receive a loading dose to help the drug reach a steady level in your body more quickly.

After the loading dose, the drug is given every other week as a maintenance dose. There is no weekly dosage option for Dupixent.

The table below lists the recommended dosages for the conditions Dupixent is used to treat.

ConditionAgeLoading doseMaintenance dose
Asthma12 years and older400 mg (two 200-mg injections) 200 mg every other week
600 mg (two 300-mg injections)300 mg every other week
Eczema6 to 17 years oldFor children weighing 15 kilograms (kg)* to less than 30 kg, the dose is 600 mg (two 300-mg injections)300 mg every 4 weeks
For children weighing 30 kg to less than 60 kg, the dose is 400 mg (two 200-mg injections)200 mg every other week
For children weighing 60 kg or more, the dose is 600 mg (two-300 mg injections)300 mg every other week
EczemaAdults600 mg (2 Dupixent 300-mg injections)300 mg every other week
Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polypsAdultsNone300 mg every other week

* One kg equals about 2.2 pounds.

Dosage for asthma

For moderate to severe asthma, Dupixent can be used in adults and children ages 12 years and older. For details on the dosages for this condition, see the dosage chart above.

Asthma and eczema are both inflammatory conditions that have a strong connection. If you have both eczema and asthma, your doctor may start you on a higher dose of Dupixent. You may also have a higher dose if you’re taking oral corticosteroids (taken by mouth) to manage your asthma symptoms.

If you need a higher dose due to either of these factors, you’ll start with a loading dose of 600 mg (two 300-mg injections). After that, your dosage will be 300 mg every other week.

Dosage for eczema

Dupixent is used to treat moderate to severe eczema. To learn more, see the dosage chart above.

Dosage for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

Dupixent is used to treat chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. For this condition, you won’t start with a loading dose. Instead, you’ll take the same dosage of Dupixent throughout your treatment. For details, see the dosage chart above.

Is Dupixent used long term?

Yes, Dupixent is typically used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Dupixent is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely use it long term.

What’s the dosage of Dupixent for children?

Dupixent is used to treat asthma in children ages 12 years and older. The dosage is the same as for adults. Dupixent is also used to treat eczema in children ages 6 years and older. The dosage for eczema is based on the child’s weight.

For more details on the dosages for each of these uses, see the dosage chart above.

Dosage adjustments

Your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of Dupixent depending on your age and the condition being treated. For children, a change in weight could also lead to a dosage adjustment.

Your doctor may also prescribe a higher dosage if you have both eczema and asthma or if you’re taking oral corticosteroids to manage your asthma symptoms.

If you have questions about the Dupixent dosage that’s right for you, talk with your doctor.

If you get your Dupixent dose at your doctor’s office, it’s important to keep all of your injection appointments. If you miss an appointment, call your doctor’s office as soon as possible to reschedule.

If you give yourself Dupixent injections at home, follow the advice below for your dosage schedule.

Doses injected every other week:

If you miss a dose and it’s within 7 days of when you should have had it, give yourself an injection as soon as you remember. Then continue with your regular dosage schedule. But if it’s been longer than 7 days, just skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule.

Doses injected every 4 weeks:

If you miss a dose and it’s within 7 days of when you should have had it, give yourself an injection as soon as you remember. Then continue your regular dosage schedule. But if it’s been longer than 7 days, give yourself an injection and then start a new 4-week dosage schedule beginning on that day.

If you miss a dose and have any questions about your dosage schedule, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can help you get back on track with your Dupixent schedule.

If you need help remembering to take your dose of Dupixent on time, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm, downloading a reminder app, or setting a timer on your phone. A kitchen timer can work, too.

The dosage of Dupixent your doctor prescribes may depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Dupixent to treat
  • your age
  • other conditions you may have (see “Dosage adjustments” under “What is Dupixent’s dosage?”)
  • for children ages 6 to 17 years, their weight

Your doctor will prescribe the lowest dose to effectively manage your condition to avoid side effects of Dupixent. If you have questions about your dosage of Dupixent, ask your doctor or pharmacist. They can tell you more about your dose.

Dupixent is a prescription drug that comes as a prefilled syringe and prefilled pens. The drug is given as an injection under the skin of your abdomen (belly) or thigh. (When injecting into the abdomen, the drug should not be injected within 2 inches of the belly button.)

You may receive your Dupixent injections at your doctor’s office. But in some cases, your doctor may show you how to give yourself Dupixent injections at home. Together, you and your doctor will decide the best way for you to receive Dupixent. This may depend on factors such as:

  • your age
  • how often you get Dupixent injections (every other week or every 4 weeks)
  • your insurance plan
  • your comfort level with self-injection

If you’re using Dupixent for asthma or eczema, the loading dose of two injections should be given in two different areas. After this, rotate the injection sites for your maintenance doses. You should not inject the drug into skin that is scarred, damaged, or irritated.

Before using Dupixent at home, remove the dose from the refrigerator. For the 300-mg dose (in either the syringe or prefilled pen), this should be at least 45 minutes before your injection. For the 200-mg dose (in either form), remove it from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before your injection.

To learn more about how to use Dupixent, see the step-by-step instructions for the prefilled syringe or the prefilled pen. You can also ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information on how to self-inject Dupixent.

Do not use more Dupixent than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

What to do in case you use too much Dupixent

Call your doctor right away if you think you’ve used too much Dupixent. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use their online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, call 911 (or your local emergency number) immediately or go to the nearest emergency room.

The sections above describe the typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Dupixent for you, they’ll prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

Remember, you should not change your dosage of Dupixent without your doctor’s recommendation. Only take Dupixent exactly as prescribed. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your current dosage.

Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Will my Dupixent dosage change if I’m also taking other medications for my condition?
  • Will I have more side effects with a higher dose of Dupixent?
  • Can I switch from using the Dupixent prefilled syringe to the prefilled pen?
  • Will my Dupixent dosage change if it’s not helping my condition?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.