If you have a certain problem with your stomach or esophagus, your doctor might suggest Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) as a treatment option for you. Along with other questions you may have about the drug, you could be wondering about its side effects.

Dexilant is a prescription medication that’s used in adults and children to:

Dexilant comes as a capsule that you swallow. It’s meant to be used as a short-term treatment.

For more information about Dexilant, including details about its uses, see this in-depth article on the drug.

Like other drugs, Dexilant can cause mild or serious side effects. Keep reading to learn more.

Some people may experience mild or serious side effects during their Dexilant treatment. Examples of Dexilant’s commonly reported side effects include:

Keep reading to learn about other possible mild and serious side effects of Dexilant.

Below is a short list of some of Dexilant’s mild side effects.

Examples of mild side effects that have been reported with Dexilant include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

In most cases, these side effects should be temporary. And some may be easily managed, too. But if you have any symptoms that are ongoing or that bother you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. And don’t stop using Dexilant unless your doctor recommends it.

Dexilant may cause mild side effects other than the ones listed above. See the Dexilant medication guide for details.

Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, it tracks and reviews side effects of the medication. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Dexilant, visit MedWatch.

Serious side effects from Dexilant are rare, but they can happen.

Serious side effects that have been reported with Dexilant include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

If you develop serious side effects while taking Dexilant, call your doctor right away. If the side effects seem life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number.

Dexilant is used to treat certain types of stomach or esophagus problems in some children. (For information about the uses of Dexilant in children, see this detailed article.)

Most side effects of Dexilant in children are expected to be the same as those in adults. But some side effects of Dexilant may be more common in children. These include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

Talk with your child’s doctor about their risk of side effects from Dexilant.

Get answers to some frequently asked questions about Dexilant’s side effects.

Are any of Dexilant’s side effects long term?

Possibly. Most side effects of Dexilant should go away within hours or days after you start taking the drug. But some of Dexilant’s side effects may be long term. Examples include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

To lower the risk of these side effects, your doctor will prescribe Dexilant for the shortest time needed to treat your condition.

If you have more questions about what to expect with Dexilant treatment, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Will I have an increased risk of side effects if I take the 60-mg Dexilant capsules?

Yes, you may have an increased risk of certain side effects with higher doses of Dexilant.

For example, your risk of bone fracture* from Dexilant is greater if you take higher doses of the drug.

If you have more questions about your risk of certain side effects from Dexilant, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* To learn more about this side effect, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

Can Dexilant cause tiredness?

It isn’t common, but it’s possible. Anemia (a low level of red blood cells) was reported as a rare side effect in studies of Dexilant. Tiredness is a common symptom of anemia. Sleepiness was also a less common side effect reported in studies of Dexilant.

If you have tiredness while taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor. They’ll try to find out if Dexilant is the cause of your tiredness.

Does Dexilant cause any heart- or liver-related side effects?

Less commonly, Dexilant may cause certain side effects that affect your heart or liver. For example, Dexilant may cause a low level of magnesium in your blood. And if it isn’t treated, this condition can lead to serious heart problems, such as an abnormal heart rhythm.

Dexilant may also cause lupus. (This is an autoimmune disease that results in pain and inflammation throughout the body.) And some people with lupus experience heart- or liver-related problems.

Other heart- and liver-related problems were also reported as rare side effects in studies of Dexilant. For more information, see Dexilant’s prescribing information.

If you’re concerned about your risk of heart- or liver-related side effects with Dexilant, talk with your doctor.

Will taking Dexilant cause hair loss?

Taking Dexilant shouldn’t cause hair loss. This side effect wasn’t reported in studies of the drug.

If you have hair loss while taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor. They’ll work with you to figure out what the cause might be and suggest ways to treat it.

Learn more about some of the side effects that Dexilant may cause.

Weight gain

Weight gain is a rare side effect of Dexilant.

Keep in mind that Dexilant is used for conditions involving your stomach or esophagus. These conditions can cause symptoms such as nausea and trouble swallowing. This can lead to loss of appetite, which may result in weight loss.

The symptoms of your condition should lessen after you start taking Dexilant, which could improve your appetite. This may cause weight gain.

So it’s possible that weight gain may not be due to taking Dexilant. Instead, weight gain could be a sign that your appetite is returning as the symptoms of your condition ease.

What might help

If you’re concerned about weight gain while you’re taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor. They can suggest ways to maintain a moderate weight.

Headache

Headache is a possible side effect of Dexilant. This was a rare side effect in studies of adults who used the drug. But it was a more common side effect in studies of children who used the drug.

Headaches from Dexilant are usually mild.

What might help

Mild headaches from Dexilant treatment tend to go away on their own. You may find that taking an over-the-counter pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) helps ease your headache.

If you have bothersome headaches while taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor. They can suggest ways to ease this side effect.

Dizziness

Dizziness is a rare side effect of Dexilant.

But keep in mind that dizziness can be a symptom of having a low level of magnesium in your blood. Dexilant can cause low magnesium levels as a side effect. This is especially so if you’ve been taking the drug for longer than 3 months. And if it isn’t treated, this condition can lead to serious problems, such as seizures and an abnormal heart rhythm.

What might help

If you have dizziness while taking Dexilant, tell your doctor. They may want to check your magnesium level to make sure it isn’t lower than it should be.

Bone fracture

Bone fracture is a rare but serious side effect of Dexilant.

Dexilant can increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. This condition causes brittle or weak bones, which can increase the risk of bone fractures in your hips, wrists, or spine.

Your risk of bone fracture is higher if you take multiple doses of Dexilant daily for 1 year or longer. Your risk may also be higher if you already have osteoporosis when you start taking the drug.

Watch for the following symptoms of osteoporosis while taking Dexilant:

  • back pain
  • height loss
  • nails that are weak or brittle
  • neck pain
  • receding gums (a condition that happens when your gums pull back from the surface of your teeth)

What might help

To lower the risk of bone fractures, your doctor will prescribe Dexilant for the shortest time needed to treat your condition.

Before taking Dexilant, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis. Also, tell them if you have any symptoms of osteoporosis. They’ll likely run tests, such as a bone density scan, to check for this condition.

Joint pain

Joint pain is a rare side effect of Dexilant.

But joint pain can be a symptom of other conditions, such as lupus. (Lupus is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and inflammation throughout the body.) And lupus is a rare but serious side effect of Dexilant.

What might help

Tell your doctor if you have joint pain while taking Dexilant. They’ll likely order tests to check for more serious conditions, such as lupus.

Allergic reaction

Like most drugs, Dexilant can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Symptoms can be mild or serious and can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)
  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat, which can make it hard to breathe

What might help

If you have mild symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as a mild rash, call your doctor right away. To manage your symptoms, they may suggest an over-the-counter antihistamine that you take by mouth, such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine). Or they may recommend a product that you apply to your skin, such as hydrocortisone cream.

If your doctor confirms that you had a mild allergic reaction to Dexilant, they’ll decide if you should continue using it.

If you have symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, such as swelling or trouble breathing, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. These symptoms could be life threatening and require immediate medical care.

If your doctor confirms that you had a serious allergic reaction to Dexilant, they may have you switch to a different treatment.

Keeping track of side effects

During your Dexilant treatment, consider keeping notes on any side effects you’re having. Then, you can share this information with your doctor. This is especially helpful to do when you first start taking new drugs or using a combination of treatments.

Your side effect notes can include things such as:

  • what dose of drug you were taking when you had the side effect
  • how soon after starting that dose you had the side effect
  • what your symptoms were from the side effect
  • how it affected your daily activities
  • what other medications you were also taking
  • any other information you feel is important

Keeping notes and sharing them with your doctor will help your doctor learn more about how Dexilant affects you. And your doctor can use this information to adjust your treatment plan if needed.

Dexilant may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Dexilant. The list below includes some factors to consider.

Low level of magnesium. Before taking Dexilant, tell your doctor if you have a low level of magnesium in your blood. Dexilant can lower your magnesium level even more. Your doctor may check your magnesium level while you’re taking this drug.

Liver problems. If you have liver problems, your body may not be able to break down Dexilant effectively. This can raise the level of Dexilant in your body, which can increase your risk of side effects. Before taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor about any liver problems you have.

Lupus. Dexilant may worsen lupus symptoms. Lupus is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and inflammation throughout the body. Before starting Dexilant treatment, be sure to tell your doctor if you have lupus. They may watch your condition closely while you take this drug. Or they may prescribe a drug other than Dexilant for you.

Neuroendocrine tumors. Before you start taking Dexilant, tell your doctor if you have a neuroendocrine tumor. This is a rare type of cancer that usually grows around the lungs, pancreas, or digestive system. Dexilant can cause a false-positive result on a lab test used for this type of cancer. Your doctor will wait until 2 weeks after you’ve stopped taking Dexilant before ordering the lab test.

Osteoporosis. Before taking Dexilant, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis (a condition that causes brittle or weak bones). Dexilant can cause bone fractures related to osteoporosis in the hips, wrists, or spine. If you have osteoporosis before starting Dexilant treatment, you may have a higher risk of this side effect. To lower your risk of bone fractures, your doctor will prescribe Dexilant for the shortest time needed to treat your condition.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Dexilant or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Dexilant. Ask your doctor which other medications are better options for you.

Alcohol use and Dexilant

There aren’t any known interactions between alcohol and Dexilant.

But alcohol may worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which Dexilant is used to treat. So if you drink alcohol while taking Dexilant for GERD, the drug may not work as well for you.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about the amount that’s safe for you to have while you’re taking Dexilant.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking Dexilant

It isn’t known for sure if Dexilant is safe to take during pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant or breastfeed, talk with your doctor before starting Dexilant treatment.

Dexilant is used to treat certain problems with the stomach or esophagus.

Mild side effects from Dexilant are common. But Dexilant can also cause serious side effects in some people, especially with long-term use.

If you have questions about side effects from Dexilant, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Below are a few questions you may want to ask:

  • How can I manage the side effects I may have from Dexilant?
  • Are there any side effects of Dexilant that I should tell you about right away?
  • How long can I take Dexilant without increasing my risk of side effects?

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.