If you have certain health conditions, your doctor may discuss clonazepam with you. It’s a prescription drug that’s used in people with:

  • Seizure disorders. Clonazepam is used to treat several types of seizures in adults and children. It may be used alone or together with other drugs for this use.
  • Panic disorder. Clonazepam is used short term in adults to treat symptoms of panic disorder, including panic attacks. With a panic attack, you have sudden, intense feelings of fear or discomfort. Or, you feel threatened with no clear cause.

To learn more about clonazepam’s uses, see the “What are clonazepam tablets used for?” section below.

Clonazepam tablet basics

Clonazepam is an active drug that comes as:

  • oral tablets that you swallow
  • orally disintegrating tablets that rapidly dissolve in your mouth

Clonazepam is a generic drug. It belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines.

Read on to learn more about how clonazepam works, its side effects, interactions, and more.

Clonazepam tablet brand-name versions

Clonazepam oral tablets are available in a brand-name version called Klonopin. There’s no brand-name version of clonazepam orally disintegrating tablets. To learn more about the brand-name drug Klonopin, talk with your doctor.

Clonazepam tablets are a generic drug, which means they’re an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The brand-name medication that clonazepam oral tablets are based on is called Klonopin.

Generic drugs are thought to be as safe and effective as the brand-name drug they’re based on. In general, generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs do.

If you’d like to know more about using Klonopin instead of clonazepam oral tablets, talk with your doctor. Read this Healthline article to learn more about the differences between generic and brand-name drugs.

Like most drugs, clonazepam tablets may cause mild and serious side effects. The lists below describe some of the more common side effects that clonazepam tablets may cause. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

Keep in mind that side effects of a drug can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions you have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the potential side effects of clonazepam tablets. They can also suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that clonazepam tablets can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read the prescribing information for clonazepam oral tablets and orally disintegrating tablets.*

Mild side effects of clonazepam tablets that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* To learn about these two forms of clonazepam, see the “How are clonazepam tablets taken?” section below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from clonazepam tablets can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from clonazepam tablets, call your doctor right away. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of clonazepam tablets that have been reported include:

* For more information on this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

SUICIDE PREVENTION

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.
  • Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  • Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline. Try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

Side effect focus

Learn more about some of the side effects clonazepam tablets may cause.

Boxed warnings

Clonazepam tablets have boxed warnings. A boxed warning is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Clonazepam’s boxed warnings are described below.

Misuse and addiction. Taking clonazepam can increase the risk of misuse and addiction.

Misusing clonazepam means it’s taken differently than how your doctor prescribed it. (For example, it may be taken more often than prescribed.) Misuse of clonazepam increases the risk of overdose, and in some cases, death.

With addiction, clonazepam is taken even if it causes harmful outcomes.

Dependence and withdrawal. Clonazepam can cause physical dependence. This is a condition that happens when your body becomes used to the drug and needs it to function normally.

With dependence, suddenly stopping clonazepam can lead to withdrawal symptoms, including:

Risks if used with opioids. Taking clonazepam and opioids together increases your risk for serious side effects. These include slowed breathing, excessive drowsiness, coma, and in rare cases, death.

What might help

Before starting clonazepam, tell your doctor if you’ve ever experienced drug misuse or addiction to any substances. Also discuss all of your medications with your doctor. Let them know if you’re taking any opioid drugs or other medications that might interact with clonazepam.

Your doctor will routinely monitor how you’re doing with clonazepam. Don’t suddenly stop taking this drug. Instead, talk with your doctor if you’re experiencing side effects or have other concerns about the drug. If your doctor lowers your dosage or has you stop taking the drug, they may do this slowly to help prevent withdrawal symptoms.

Before taking this drug, ask your doctor about all the risks and benefits of clonazepam. Always take clonazepam exactly as your doctor has prescribed.

To learn more about misuse and addiction with clonazepam, see the “Can clonazepam tablets be misused?” section below. To find more information about use with opioids, see “Interactions” in the “What should be considered before taking clonazepam tablets?” section below.

Long-term side effects

Taking clonazepam tablets may lead to some long-term side effects. Possible long-term side effects of the drug are described below.

Keep in mind that clonazepam tablets are only used for short-term treatment of panic disorder. The exact length of time they should be used for seizures will be recommended by your doctor. Be sure to talk with your doctor for more information about long-term use of clonazepam.

Dependence and withdrawal. With long-term use, you may become physically dependent on clonazepam. To learn about dependence, see the “Boxed warnings” section directly above. Suddenly stopping clonazepam after you’ve been taking it for several weeks can cause serious withdrawal symptoms, including seizures. Withdrawal from clonazepam can last from a few weeks to over 12 months.

Addiction. There’s a risk of developing addiction with long-term use of clonazepam. Addiction increases your risk for misuse, overdose, and in some cases, death. To learn about addiction and misuse, see the “Boxed warnings” section directly above.

Changes in mental and physical health. Taking clonazepam long term may cause problems with your balance and coordination. This side effect may be worse in older adults. Long-term use of this drug can also cause certain mental health problems, including:

What might help

It’s important to discuss your medical history with your doctor before taking clonazepam. They can help you decide if clonazepam is right for you.

Your doctor will discuss the benefits and risks of this drug with you. How clonazepam affects your body will depend on individual factors such as your age, overall health, and other medications you take.

Don’t stop taking clonazepam on your own or make any changes to your dosage without checking with your doctor. Doing these things increases your risk for serious side effects from the drug. Instead, talk with your doctor about any concerns you have with clonazepam. Your doctor can adjust your dosage or suggest other medications if clonazepam isn’t working for you.

Sleepiness

When you first start taking clonazepam, you might have excessive sleepiness. This is a common side effect of the drug.

Being extremely tired might affect your ability to do daily activities such as working and driving. It can also affect whether you can do other tasks that require you to be alert.

What might help

Until you become used to how clonazepam affects you, be careful with any activities that require alertness.

Ask your doctor how not to be tired while taking clonazepam. They may offer suggestions on the best time of day to take the drug to minimize this side effect.

In most cases, tiredness with clonazepam is temporary and should go away. If it continues to be bothersome, tell your doctor and ask them how to manage it.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to clonazepam tablets.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to clonazepam tablets. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Find answers to some commonly asked questions about clonazepam tablets.

Is clonazepam used for anxiety or problems with sleep? If so, what’s the dosage?

Clonazepam is sometimes used off-label for anxiety disorders or problems with sleep. (With off-label use, a drug is given for a condition other than what it’s approved to treat.)

These aren’t approved uses of clonazepam. But sometimes the drug is used short term and off-label for these conditions.

If you’d like to know about this, ask your doctor. They can give you more information, including dosage recommendations.

How does clonazepam work? What’s its half-life and how long does is stay in your system and last?

Clonazepam is a benzodiazepine. These types of drugs work by increasing the activity of a certain brain chemical called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This is the drug’s mechanism of action.

Increasing the activity of GABA in your brain causes a sedating and relaxing effect on your body. (With sedation, you feel very sleepy.)

Clonazepam has a half-life of around 30 to 40 hours. This means it takes this amount of time for half of a dose of the drug to leave your body.

Clonazepam starts to work quickly and lasts in your system for several hours. How long the drug lasts can depend on:

  • your age
  • other health conditions, such as kidney or liver problems
  • your genetics
  • other medications you may be taking that interact with clonazepam

For example, how long a 0.25-mg dose or a 0.5-mg dose of clonazepam lasts can vary. But in general, each dose works for about 6 to 8 hours.

Is clonazepam a controlled substance? Is it detected in urine for a certain amount of time?

Yes, clonazepam is a controlled, Schedule IV drug. The Drug Enforcement Administration has assigned clonazepam a schedule. This is because while the drug has a medical use, it can cause misuse, addiction, and dependence.

With misuse, clonazepam is taken differently than how it was prescribed. With addiction, clonazepam is taken even with possibly harmful outcomes. With dependence, your body needs the drug in order to function normally. To learn more about these conditions, see the “What are clonazepam tablets’ side effects?” section above.

Clonazepam has a half-life of 30 to 40 hours or longer. This means it takes 30 to 40 hours for your body to clear half of a dose of the drug.

Clonazepam stays in your body for a long time and can be detected by urine drug screens. How long it may be detected in urine depends on the particular test that’s used and how your body breaks down the drug.

If you’re taking clonazepam and need to have a urine drug screen, tell the person giving you the test that you’re taking this medication.

How does clonazepam compare with diazepam?

Clonazepam (Klonopin) and diazepam (Valium) are both generic drugs. Valium is the brand name for diazepam, and Klonopin is the brand name for clonazepam.

Both drugs belong to the same group of medications called benzodiazepines. They have similar side effects, interactions, and warnings for use. Clonazepam and diazepam do have some differences, though. This includes their strengths, how long they last in your body, and their uses.

For instance, clonazepam is used to treat:

Diazepam is used:

Both drugs may also be used off-label for other uses. This is when a drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for. Your doctor can tell you more about the uses of these two drugs.

To learn more about how these two drugs compare, ask your doctor. They can give you more information about which drug is better for your needs.

Does clonazepam treat depression?

Clonazepam isn’t approved to treat depression. Your doctor may prescribe it off-label with other antidepressant medications to help manage possible symptoms of depression, such as anxiety. (With off-label use, a drug is given for a condition other than what it’s approved to treat.)

It’s important to know that depression is a less common, but serious side effect of clonazepam. So be sure to discuss your mental health history and all your current medications with your doctor.

If you’ve ever taken a benzodiazepine such as clonazepam in the past, let your doctor know. They can tell you more about clonazepam, and its benefits and risks for your condition.

Is clonazepam used for burning mouth syndrome?

Burning mouth syndrome is a rare, challenging condition. It causes mouth pain, altered taste, and dry mouth. It affects more females than males.*

It’s hard to diagnose and treat burning mouth syndrome because it’s often unclear what causes the condition. In studies, clonazepam hasn’t been shown to be an effective treatment for this condition.

If you have burning mouth syndrome, ask your doctor or dentist for more information about treatments. They can suggest ways to manage this condition.

* In this article, we use the terms “male” and “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

Your doctor will explain how you should take clonazepam tablets. They will also explain how much to take and how often. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Taking clonazepam tablets

Clonazepam comes as oral tablets you’ll swallow. It also comes as orally disintegrating tablets that rapidly dissolve in your mouth.

Both forms of clonazepam come in several strengths. For instance, oral tablets come in these strengths:

  • 0.5 milligrams (mg)
  • 1 mg
  • 2 mg

Orally disintegrating tablets come in these strengths:

  • 0.125 mg
  • 0.25 mg
  • 0.5 mg
  • 1 mg
  • 2 mg

Clonazepam doesn’t come in other strengths, such as 3 mg, 4 mg, 5 mg or higher. So if you’re prescribed these doses of the drug, your doctor or pharmacist will explain how to take your dose.

Dosage

Your dose of clonazepam will differ depending on the condition you’re treating. How often you’ll take doses will also vary. With clonazepam, dosages for seizure disorders are higher than those for panic disorder.

Your doctor will tell you how much clonazepam you’ll need for your condition. They may have you start taking a low dose of clonazepam at first to see how your body does with the drug. Ultimately, your dosage depends on:

  • the condition being treated
  • other drugs you may be taking
  • other health conditions you have
  • your age

Taking clonazepam tablets with other drugs

Your doctor may prescribe clonazepam with other medications to manage your condition. For example, they may prescribe it with other drugs for seizure disorders. For panic disorder, clonazepam may be used alone.

Talk with your doctor to learn more about taking other drugs with clonazepam.

Questions about taking clonazepam tablets

Here’s a list of common questions related to taking clonazepam.

  • What if I miss a dose of clonazepam tablets? If you accidentally forget to take a dose of clonazepam, take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s too close to your next scheduled dose of the drug, just skip the missed dose and continue with your normal schedule. Remember, taking clonazepam as prescribed helps manage your condition. Missing doses often can interrupt your treatment plan. Consider a medication reminder tool to help keep you on track with doses.
  • Will I need to use clonazepam tablets long term? How long you’ll take clonazepam depends on the condition being treated. There’s no clear evidence about using clonazepam long term. Your doctor will discuss risks and benefits of using clonazepam for your condition. They’ll also monitor you while you’re taking the drug.
  • Can clonazepam tablets be chewed, crushed, or split? It depends on the form of clonazepam tablets. You should swallow whole the oral tablet form of the drug. But clonazepam orally disintegrating tablets dissolve as soon as you place them inside your mouth. Make sure your hands are dry when you open the blister packet of these tablets and put one in your mouth. The tablet will dissolve immediately once it becomes moist. Your doctor can tell you more about which type of clonazepam is best for you and how to take each type. And they can let you know about chewing, crushing, or splitting the tablets.
  • Should I take clonazepam tablets with food? You can take clonazepam with food or on an empty stomach. Food doesn’t change how the drug works in your body. Depending on how often your doctor tells you to take the drug, timing your doses around meals may help you remember to take the drug. Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information on the best way to take clonazepam.
  • How long do clonazepam tablets take to work? Clonazepam starts to work within 1 to 4 hours after it’s taken to help manage your symptoms. How quickly it works for you depends on your genetics, other drugs you may be taking, and how well your kidneys and liver are working.
Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about clonazepam tablets and your treatment plan. It’s important to discuss all your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help guide your discussion:

  • Before your appointment, write down questions such as:
    • How will clonazepam tablets affect my body, mood, or lifestyle?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment if doing so will help you feel more comfortable.
  • If you don’t understand something related to your condition or treatment, ask your doctor to explain it to you.

Remember, your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. And they want you to get the best care possible. So don’t be afraid to ask questions or offer feedback on your treatment.

Before taking clonazepam, tell your doctor about all your medications and health history. If you’ve taken benzodiazepines in the past, let them know. (Keep in mind that clonazepam is a benzodiazepine.)

Also talk with your doctor if you’ve ever experienced drug misuse or substance use disorder. (Misusing a drug means it’s taken differently than how your doctor prescribed it.)

These and other considerations are described below. Your doctor can discuss with you the risks and benefits of using clonazepam for your condition.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before taking clonazepam tablets, be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take, including prescription and over-the-counter types. Also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions these items may cause with clonazepam tablets.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Clonazepam tablets can interact with several types of drugs. Interactions may cause increased side effects.

These drugs include:

This list does not contain all types of drugs that may interact with clonazepam tablets. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about these interactions and any others that may occur with use of clonazepam tablets.

* Clonazepam tablets have a boxed warning about risks if used with opioids. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information about lorazepam’s boxed warnings, see the “What are clonazepam tablets’ side effects?” section above.

Other interactions

Clonazepam can also interact with herbs and supplements that cause sedation (sleepiness). This interaction can increase certain side effects of clonazepam.

To help avoid serious side effects, be sure to let your doctor know if you’re taking any herbs or supplements before starting clonazepam.

Some examples of herbs and supplements to avoid with clonazepam use include:

Boxed warnings

Clonazepam tablets have boxed warnings about their use. Boxed warnings are serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Misuse and addiction. Taking clonazepam increases your risk for misuse and addiction. With misuse, clonazepam is taken differently than how it was prescribed. (For example, it may be taken more often than prescribed.) With addiction, clonazepam is taken even if it causes harmful outcomes. Misuse and addiction increase the risk of overdose and even death.

Dependence. Taking clonazepam can cause physical dependence on the drug. Dependence means your body needs the drug in order to function normally. With dependence on clonazepam, suddenly stopping the drug can lead to withdrawal symptoms. Severe withdrawal symptoms may be life threatening. So it’s important to take the drug exactly as it’s prescribed by your doctor.

Use with opioid drugs. Taking clonazepam with opioids can cause dangerous side effects. These include slowed breathing, excessive drowsiness, coma, and even death.

For more information about clonazepam’s boxed warnings, see the “What are clonazepam tablets’ side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

Clonazepam tablets may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. Talk with your doctor about your health history before you take clonazepam.

Factors to consider include those in the list below.

  • Porphyria. If you have the blood disorder called porphyria, clonazepam may worsen your condition. Your doctor can tell you more about this risk and whether clonazepam is safe for you to take.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to clonazepam tablets or any of their ingredients, you shouldn’t take clonazepam tablets. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Lung problems. Clonazepam can cause respiratory depression (slowed breathing) if you have lung-related conditions. These include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and sleep apnea. If you have these conditions, clonazepam may increase your risk for breathing problems. Your doctor can provide more information about this risk.
  • Liver disease. If you have severe liver disease, you should not take clonazepam. The drug can cause dangerous side effects. Tell your doctor about any liver problems you have before taking clonazepam.
  • Kidney disease. If you have serious problems with your kidneys, clonazepam may build up in your body and cause side effects. Your doctor will check your kidneys and adjust your dosage if needed. In some cases, clonazepam may not be suitable for you.
  • Acute narrow angle glaucoma. If you have this type of glaucoma, you should not take clonazepam. It can increase your eye pressure, worsening your eye condition. Ask your doctor for more information.
  • Worsening of mental health conditions. For some people, taking clonazepam can worsen certain mental health conditions. This includes depression, anxiety, anger, agitation, and suicidal thoughts or behaviors. These reactions are more likely to happen in children or older adults taking the drug. Discuss your mental health history with your doctor. They can give you more information about the safety of taking clonazepam. If you experience worsening of mental health symptoms while you’re taking clonazepam, tell your doctor right away. They can help you slowly stop taking clonazepam in a way that’s safe. This will help you to avoid withdrawal symptoms or worsening of mental health symptoms.

Clonazepam tablets and alcohol

You should avoid drinking alcohol if you’re taking clonazepam. Alcohol can increase certain side effects of clonazepam, including:

Your doctor can give you more information about the risks of drinking alcohol while you’re taking clonazepam.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Clonazepam may harm a fetus if it’s taken while you’re pregnant. So it may not be safe to use this drug during pregnancy.

Some information suggests that taking clonazepam later in pregnancy or during childbirth may cause problems for a baby. For example, a baby may develop dependence and withdrawal symptoms after birth. (With dependence, your body needs the drug to function normally.)

Babies who were exposed to clonazepam during pregnancy may also have:

This drug should only be used during pregnancy if its benefits outweigh its risks. Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or become pregnant while taking the drug.

Clonazepam does pass into breast milk. And it may increase the risk of serious side effects in a child who’s breastfed. So be sure to ask your doctor if it’s safe to take clonazepam while you’re breastfeeding. They may discuss alternative ways to feed your child while you’re taking the drug.

If you have certain health conditions, your doctor may discuss clonazepam with you.

It’s a prescription drug that’s used in people with:

  • Seizure disorders. Clonazepam tablets are used to treat specific kinds of seizures in adults and children, including infants. This drug is used for petit mal (absence) seizures seen with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, myoclonic seizures, and akinetic (atonic) seizures. It’s also prescribed for absence seizures when certain other drugs haven’t worked. Clonazepam can be used alone or together with other seizure medications. To learn more about these types of seizures and how they make you feel, read this article.
  • Panic disorder. Clonazepam tablets are used in adults to treat types of panic disorder, including panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. (Agoraphobia is a fear of places or certain situations.)With panic disorder, you can have sudden panic attacks that cause feelings of extreme fear, worry, or discomfort, without an obvious cause.

Your doctor may prescribe clonazepam off-label for other conditions. With off-label use, a doctor prescribes a drug for conditions other than the drug’s approved uses. Your doctor can tell you more about possible off-label uses for clonazepam.

Clonazepam belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. These types of drugs work by increasing levels of a certain brain chemical called gamma-aminobutyric acid.

If you’d like, ask your doctor for more information about the uses, benefits, and risks of clonazepam.

Clonazepam (Klonopin) and lorazepam (Ativan) are prescription drugs that are available in both generic and brand-name versions. They belong to the same group of drugs called benzodiazepines, and they work in similar ways.

These drugs have different active ingredients, uses, dosage forms, and strengths. But they have some similarities as well. For example, clonazepam and alprazolam have similar side effects, drug interactions, and warnings.

If you’d like to learn more about how clonazepam and lorazepam compare, see this article’s section called “Ativan vs. Klonopin.” Also be sure to talk with your doctor about which drug is right for you.

Don’t take more clonazepam tablets than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects, which can be life threatening.

Symptoms of overdose

Possible symptoms of clonazepam overdose can include:

What to do in case you take too much clonazepam

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too many clonazepam tablets. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room. Getting help on time can possibly save your life.

It’s possible that clonazepam may be misused. In fact, clonazepam has a boxed warning about the risk of misuse. Boxed warnings are the most serious type of warnings about a drug from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Misusing clonazepam means it’s taken differently than how your doctor prescribed it. For example, it may be taken more often than prescribed.

Some people may misuse clonazepam to get “high”. But misuse of clonazepam increases the risk of overdose, and in some cases, death.

It’s important to take clonazepam exactly as your doctor has prescribed. Don’t take a higher dose or take it more often than what’s recommended by your doctor. Doing these things can be dangerous and may lead to life threatening problems.

To learn about all the boxed warnings of clonazepam, see the “What are clonazepam tablets’ side effects?” section above.

If you have more questions about the risk of misuse with clonazepam, talk with your doctor. They can provide more information on the benefits and risks of this drug.

Clonazepam (Klonopin) and alprazolam (Xanax) are available brand-name and generic versions. These medications belong to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines, and they work in similar ways.

Clonazepam and alprazolam have different active ingredients, dosage forms, strengths, and uses. But both drugs have similar side effects, drug interactions, and warnings.

To learn more about the similarities and differences of these two medications, see this detailed comparison. You can also talk with your doctor about which treatment is best for your condition.

Costs of prescription drugs can vary depending on many factors. These factors include what your insurance plan covers and which pharmacy you use. To find current prices for clonazepam oral tablets and orally disintegrating tablets in your area, visit GoodRx.com.*

Financial assistance to help you pay for clonazepam tablets may be available. Medicine Assistance Tool and NeedyMeds are two websites that provide resources to help reduce the cost of clonazepam tablets.

These websites also offer tools to help you find low-cost healthcare and certain educational resources. To learn more, visit their websites.

* To learn about these two forms of clonazepam, see the “How are clonazepam tablets taken?” section above.

Your doctor may prescribe clonazepam if you have certain conditions, such as panic attacks or some types of seizures. To learn more about the uses of clonazepam, see the “What are clonazepam tablets used for?” section above.

Clonazepam comes in two tablet forms. Your doctor will prescribe the form that’s best for you. See the “How are clonazepam tablets taken?” section above for more information about these forms.

Here are a few questions to consider asking your doctor about clonazepam:

  • How long will I need to take clonazepam?
  • Will I have withdrawal symptoms if I stop taking clonazepam?
  • Are there other drugs that are better for my condition?

Read this article to learn about different medications available to treat epilepsy and seizures. You can also learn about other treatment options for panic attacks here.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.