Celebrex (celecoxib) is a prescription pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory drug that’s used to treat:

Like other drugs, Celebrex may have interactions.

Some interactions occur because one substance causes another substance to have a different effect than expected. For example, sometimes alcohol, another drug, or a supplement can affect how a drug acts in your body. Interactions can also occur if you have certain health conditions.

Keep reading to learn about Celebrex’s possible interactions, including what you cannot take with Celebrex. And for more information about Celebrex, including its uses, see this article.

Certain health conditions or other factors could raise your risk of harm if you take Celebrex. In such cases, your doctor may not prescribe Celebrex for you. These are known as contraindications. The list below includes contraindications of Celebrex.

If you’ve had an allergic reaction. If you have had an allergic reaction to Celebrex or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex. You can ask them about other treatments that may be better options for you.

If you’ve had an allergic reaction to other NSAIDs. Celebrex is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). If you’ve had an allergic reaction to other NSAIDs, taking Celebrex could cause an allergic reaction. Examples of other NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn).

If you’ve had an allergic reaction to other NSAIDs, your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex. Ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better options for you.

If you’ve had an allergic reaction to sulfonamides. Sulfonamides (sometimes called sulfa drugs) are a group of medications that cause allergic reactions in some people. Examples include sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra, Bactrim), and dapsone. Celebrex is related to sulfonamides.

If you’ve had an allergic reaction to a sulfonamide, taking Celebrex may also cause an allergic reaction. Celebrex’s manufacturer recommends avoiding Celebrex if you have a sulfa allergy. But doctors do sometimes prescribe Celebrex to people with this kind of allergy. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to sulfonamides, ask your doctor if Celebrex is right for you.

If you have heart bypass surgery. Your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex if you’re planning to have or have recently had heart bypass surgery. This surgery, also called a coronary artery bypass graft, is done to improve blood supply to the heart. Taking an NSAID such as Celebrex in the 2 weeks after heart bypass surgery can raise your risk of heart attack and stroke.*

Before you start taking Celebrex, talk with your doctor if any of the factors above apply to you. Your doctor can determine whether Celebrex is safe for you to take.

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

Before you start taking Celebrex, tell your doctor and pharmacist about any prescription, over-the-counter, or other drugs you take. Sharing this information with them may help prevent possible interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The chart below lists drugs that may interact with Celebrex. Keep in mind that this chart does not include all drugs that can interact with Celebrex. For more information about some of these interactions, see the “Drug interactions explained” section below.

Drug group or drug nameDrug examplesWhat can happen
blood thinners• apixaban (Eliquis)
• clopidogrel (Plavix)
• dabigatran (Pradaxa)
• low-dose aspirin
• rivaroxaban (Xarelto)
warfarin (Jantoven)
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex
certain antidepressants• citalopram (Celexa)
• duloxetine (Cymbalta)
fluoxetine (Prozac)
sertraline (Zoloft)
• venlafaxine (Effexor XR)
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex
certain blood pressure medications• atenolol (Tenormin)
• lisinopril (Zestril)
losartan (Cozaar)
• propranolol (Inderal LA, Innopran XL)
ramipril (Altace)
• valsartan (Diovan)
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex and can make certain blood pressure medications less effective
corticosteroidsdexamethasone (Hemady)
prednisone (Rayos)
• prednisolone
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex
diureticsfurosemide (Lasix)
hydrochlorothiazide
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex and can make diuretics less effective
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)• aspirin
• diclofenac (Zipsor)
• ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn)
can increase the risk of certain side effects from Celebrex
cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune)can increase the risk of certain side effects from cyclosporine
digoxin (Lanoxin)can increase the risk of side effects from digoxin
fluconazole (Diflucan)can increase the risk of side effects from Celebrex
lithium (Lithobid)can increase the risk of side effects from lithium
methotrexate (Trexall)can increase the risk of side effects from methotrexate
pemetrexed (Alimta)can increase the risk of side effects from pemetrexed
rifampin (Rifadin)can make Celebrex less effective

Celebrex has not been reported to interact with alcohol. However, drinking alcohol while you’re taking Celebrex may increase your risk of certain Celebrex side effects. Examples of these include:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • upset stomach
  • diarrhea
  • serious digestive problems, such as:
    • perforations (tears) in the lining of your stomach, intestines, or esophagus*

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

If you drink alcohol, ask your doctor how much is safe for you to consume while you’re taking Celebrex.

Learn more about certain drug interactions that can occur with Celebrex.

Interaction with blood thinners

There are two kinds of blood thinners: anticoagulants and antiplatelets. Both are used to help prevent dangerous blood clots. Anticoagulants are also used to treat blood clots, such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism.

Celebrex can interact with blood thinners, as described below. If you take a blood thinner, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is right for you.

What could happenExamples of blood thinner medicationsWhat you can do
Taking Celebrex with blood thinners can increase the risk of bleeding, especially in your digestive system.*• apixaban (Eliquis)
• clopidogrel (Plavix)
• low-dose aspirin
• rivaroxaban (Xarelto)
warfarin (Jantoven)
See your doctor right away if you have symptoms of bleeding in your digestive system, such as:
vomiting blood or a substance that looks like coffee grounds
• passing bloody, black, or tar-like stools

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

Interaction with NSAIDs

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are medications used to reduce inflammation (swelling) and relieve pain. Celebrex is an NSAID. You can buy certain NSAIDs over the counter (OTC) without a prescription. Note that some OTC medications for pain, cold, flu, and allergies may contain NSAIDs.

Celebrex can interact with other NSAIDs, as described below.

What could happenExamples of NSAID medicationsWhat you can do
Taking Celebrex with other NSAIDs can increase the risk of serious or life threatening digestive problems, such as bleeding, ulcers (sores), or perforations (tears) in the lining of your stomach, intestines, or esophagus (the tube that goes from your mouth to your stomach).*• aspirin
• diclofenac (Zipsor)
• ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn)
Do not take OTC medications that contain NSAIDs with Celebrex. Doctors will usually not prescribe Celebrex with other NSAIDs.

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

Interaction with certain antidepressants

Celebrex can interact with the following groups of antidepressants:

The table below describes this interaction.

What could happenExamples of SSRI and SNRI antidepressant medicationsWhat you can do
Taking Celebrex with SSRI or SNRI antidepressants can increase the risk of bleeding, especially bleeding in your digestive system.*• citalopram (Celexa)
• duloxetine (Cymbalta)
fluoxetine (Prozac)
sertraline (Zoloft)
• venlafaxine (Effexor XR)
See your doctor right away if you have symptoms of bleeding in your digestive system, such as:
vomiting blood or a substance that looks like coffee grounds
• passing bloody, black, or tar-like stools

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

Celebrex may have other interactions. They could occur with supplements, foods, vaccines, or even lab tests. See below for details.

Does Celebrex interact with supplements?

Some drugs may interact with supplements, such as herbs and vitamins.

Before you start treatment with Celebrex, talk with your doctor and pharmacist about any supplements, herbs, and vitamins you take. Sharing this information with them may help avoid possible interactions.

If you have questions about interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Celebrex and herbs

There are currently no reports of Celebrex interacting with herbs. But this does not mean interactions with herbs will not be recognized in the future.

For this reason, it’s still important to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products during Celebrex treatment.

Celebrex and vitamins

There are currently no reports of Celebrex interacting with vitamins. But this does not mean that vitamin interactions will not be recognized in the future.

For this reason, it’s still important to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products during Celebrex treatment.

Does Celebrex interact with food?

There are currently no reports of Celebrex interacting with food. If you have questions about eating certain foods during your treatment with Celebrex, talk with your doctor.

Does Celebrex interact with vaccines?

No, Celebrex has not been reported to interact with vaccines. But you should still check with your doctor before getting vaccines while you’re taking Celebrex.

Does Celebrex interact with lab tests?

No, that’s not likely. Celebrex has not been reported to interact with lab tests. But if you need lab tests while taking Celebrex, you should still tell the healthcare professional that you’re taking this medication.

Does Celebrex interact with cannabis or CBD?

Cannabis (commonly called marijuana) and cannabis products, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have been specifically reported to interact with Celebrex. Using these products with Celebrex can increase the amount of Celebrex in your body. This may raise your risk of side effects from Celebrex.

Before you start treatment with Celebrex, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you use cannabis. By sharing this information with them, you may help prevent possible interactions.

Note: Cannabis is illegal at a federal level but is legal in many states to varying degrees.

Certain medical conditions or other health factors may raise the risk of interactions with Celebrex. Before taking Celebrex, talk with your doctor about your health history. They’ll determine whether Celebrex is right for you.

Health conditions or other factors that might interact with Celebrex include:

Risk of cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems. Celebrex may raise your risk of serious or life threatening cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack and stroke.*

You may have a higher risk of these problems if you have:

  • heart disease
  • risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, or smoking
  • recently had a heart attack

If you have any of these risk factors, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you.

Due to the risk of cardiovascular problems, your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex if you’re planning to have or have recently had heart bypass surgery. Talk with them about other treatments that may be better for you. For more information, see the “When should I avoid Celebrex?” section above.

High blood pressure. Celebrex can increase your blood pressure, which may raise your risk of cardiovascular problems with Celebrex (see above). If you take certain medication for high blood pressure, Celebrex could make the medication less effective at managing your blood pressure.

If you have high blood pressure, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you. If your doctor prescribes Celebrex, they’ll likely monitor your blood pressure during treatment. They may also adjust the dosage of your blood pressure medication if needed. Or they may add another blood pressure medication to your treatment plan or switch you to a different medication.

Heart failure. If you have heart failure, Celebrex could make your condition worse. You may also have an increased risk of kidney problems with this drug (see below).

Ask your doctor whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you. If your doctor prescribes Celebrex, be sure to tell them if your heart failure symptoms get worse. For example, tell them if you have new or worsening swelling in your legs or feet, shortness of breath, or sudden weight gain.

Risk of digestive problems. Celebrex can raise your risk of serious or life threatening digestive problems.* These include bleeding, ulcers (sores), and perforations (tears) in the lining of your stomach, intestines, or esophagus.

You may have a higher risk of these problems if you:

  • are age 65 years or older
  • have had ulcers or bleeding in your digestive system in the past
  • have severe liver disease
  • have blood clotting problems
  • smoke or drink alcohol

If you have any of these risk factors, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you.

Kidney problems. Celebrex can cause new and worsen existing kidney problems, especially if you become dehydrated while taking it.

You may have a higher risk of kidney problems with Celebrex if you:

If you have a kidney problem, ask your doctor whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you. If your doctor prescribes Celebrex, they’ll likely order blood tests to check your kidney function from time to time. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids while taking Celebrex to avoid dehydrating.

Liver problems. If you have a liver problem, taking Celebrex could make it worse. Celebrex could also build up in your body, which could increase your risk of the drug’s side effects. You may also have a higher risk of digestive and kidney problems (see above) with Celebrex. Talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you.

If your doctor recommends Celebrex, they may prescribe a dosage that’s lower than usual. And they’ll likely order blood tests to check your liver function from time to time.

Asthma. Celebrex can cause asthma attacks in some people. If you have asthma, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you.

If your asthma gets worse or you have an asthma attack during Celebrex treatment, contact your doctor right away.

Older age. Celebrex is more likely to cause side effects in older people.If you’re age 65 years or older, talk with your doctor about whether this medication is right for you.

Pregnancy. If you’re 20 or more weeks pregnant, taking Celebrex may cause kidney problems in the fetus. If you’re 30 or more weeks pregnant, taking Celebrex may cause serious harm to the fetus. Doctors are not sure if Celebrex is safe to take in early pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option for you. If you’re 30 or more weeks pregnant, your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex. Ask them about other treatments that may be better for you.

Breastfeeding. Celebrex can get into breast milk in small amounts, but it’s not expected to be harmful to a child who is breastfeeding. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about whether Celebrex is a good treatment option during this time.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Celebrex, any of its ingredients, other NSAID medications, or sulfonamide medications, your doctor will likely not prescribe Celebrex. (For more information, see the “When should I avoid Celebrex?” section above.) Ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better for you.

* Celebrex has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Boxed warnings” at the top of this article.

Find answers to some frequently asked questions about Celebrex and possible interactions.

Does Celebrex interact with Tylenol?

No, it does not. There is no known interaction between Celebrex and Tylenol.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is a pain-relieving medication that you can buy over the counter. Doctors often prescribe Tylenol with Celebrex, as they work in different ways. It’s considered safe to take them together.

If you have questions about taking other pain relievers with Celebrex, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Is it safe to take baclofen with Celebrex?

Yes, it’s usually considered safe to take them together.

Baclofen (Lyvispah, Lioresal) is a muscle relaxant. It’s typically used to relieve muscle stiffness and spasms caused by multiple sclerosis (MS) or spinal injury. Doctors sometimes also prescribe baclofen off-label to treat trigeminal neuralgia (nerve pain in the face).

There aren’t any reported interactions between baclofen and Celebrex.

If you have questions about taking Celebrex with other muscle relaxants, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Is there an interaction between Celebrex and Xanax?

No, there is no known interaction between these drugs.

Alprazolam (Xanax) belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. It’s used to treat anxiety disorders.

Benzodiazepines such as Xanax can interact with several medications, especially strong pain-relieving drugs called opioids.

Celebrex is not an opioid. It’s a different kind of pain reliever called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Celebrex has not been reported to interact with Xanax. It’s generally considered safe to take these medications together.

Taking certain steps can help you avoid interactions with Celebrex. Before starting treatment, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Things to discuss with them include:

  • Whether you drink alcohol or use cannabis.
  • Other medications you take, as well as any vitamins, supplements, and herbs. Your doctor or pharmacist can help you fill out a medication list.
  • What to do if you start taking a new drug during your Celebrex treatment.

It’s also important to read Celebrex’s label and other paperwork that comes with the drug. You may see colored stickers on the label that describe interactions. And the paperwork (sometimes called the prescribing information) may have other details about interactions. If you need help understanding this information, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Taking Celebrex exactly as prescribed can also help prevent interactions.

If you still have questions about Celebrex and its possible interactions, talk with your doctor.

Questions you may want to ask your doctor include:

  • Does my risk of interactions depend on my dosage of Celebrex?
  • Could I still take Celebrex even if it interacts with a health condition I have? If so, will I be monitored more closely?
  • Do other drugs that could treat my condition have similar interactions?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.