If you have certain chronic lung conditions, your doctor might suggest Breo Ellipta as a treatment option for you. As a result, you could be looking for more information about the drug, such as details about dosage.

Breo Ellipta is a brand-name prescription medication used to treat these conditions in adults:

This article describes the dosages of Breo Ellipta, including its form, strengths, and how to use the drug. To learn more about Breo Ellipta, see this in-depth article.

Breo Ellipta is a medication that’s inhaled into your lungs through your mouth. It contains two active ingredients: fluticasone furoate, which is a corticosteroid, and vilanterol trifenatate, which is a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA).

Note: This article covers Breo Ellipta’s typical dosages, which are provided by the drug’s manufacturer. But when using Breo Ellipta, always take the dosage that your doctor prescribes.

This section covers common dosage information about Breo Ellipta.

What is Breo Ellipta’s form?

Breo Ellipta comes as a plastic disposable inhaler with two foil strips of blister packs. Each foil strip contains one of the active ingredients of the drug in powder form. (That is, one strip contains fluticasone furoate and the other vilanterol trifenatate.) You’ll use the inhaler to take a puff of (breathe in) the drug.

What strengths does Breo Ellipta come in?

The two foil strips of blister packs that Breo Ellipta comes in each contain one of the active ingredients in powder form:

  • One strip contains either 100 micrograms (mcg) or 200 mcg of fluticasone furoate per blister.
  • The other strip contains 25 mcg of vilanterol trifenatate per blister.

You may see the strengths of Breo Ellipta referred to as 100/25 or 200/25, where the first number gives the fluticasone furoate strength.

What are the typical dosages of Breo Ellipta?

The recommended dosage of Breo Ellipta depends on:

  • the condition you’re using Breo to treat
  • the severity of your condition
  • other health conditions you may have

The dose frequency of Breo Ellipta is once per day for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma.

The information below describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Dosage for asthma

Your dosage of Breo Ellipta for asthma depends on:

  • the severity of your condition
  • other treatments you may have used
  • how well your asthma is managed

Your doctor may start you on a Breo Ellipta dosage of either 100 mcg/25 mcg or 200 mcg/25 mcg once per day. Try to take your dose around the same time each day.

The maximum dosage of Breo Ellipta for asthma is one puff of the 200 mcg /25 mcg dose once per day.

If you start on the lower dose of 100 mcg/25 mcg, your doctor may increase it if your asthma symptoms aren’t being managed properly. They’ll prescribe the lowest dose that helps manage your symptoms to lower the risk of the drug’s side effects.

Keep in mind, Breo Ellipta is not for immediate relief of asthma symptoms. For breathing problems that occur between daily doses of Breo Ellipta, your doctor will prescribe a short-acting rescue inhaler. An example of this type of treatment is albuterol (ProAir, Ventolin HFA).

Dosage for COPD

Your dosage of Breo Ellipta for COPD is 100 mcg/25 mcg once per day. This is the maximum dosage of the drug for treating COPD.

Try to take your dose of Breo Ellipta at the same time daily. This will help manage your symptoms of COPD.

You may have shortness of breath that occurs between daily doses of Breo Ellipta. For immediate relief of this symptom, your doctor will prescribe a short-acting rescue inhaler. An example of this type of treatment is albuterol.

Is Breo Ellipta used long term?

Yes, Breo Ellipta is typically used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Breo Ellipta is safe and effective for you, it’s likely that you’ll use it long term.

Dosage adjustments

Your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of Breo Ellipta in some cases. Your dosage may depend on:

  • the condition being treated
  • how well your dosage manages your symptoms
  • if you have serious liver problems

Your doctor will monitor how Breo Ellipta is working for you. And they’ll adjust your dosage if needed to manage your symptoms.

If you have questions about your dosage of Breo Ellipta, talk with your doctor.

Below are some common questions about Breo Ellipta dosage.

What happens if you take two doses of Breo Ellipta?

It’s important to use Breo Ellipta exactly as your doctor has prescribed. If you’re having trouble breathing between daily doses of Breo Ellipta, do not take an extra dose.

Taking two doses of Breo Ellipta can cause serious side effects, such as heart palpitations, high blood pressure, muscle cramps, shortness of breath, or headache. See the “What should be done in case of overdose?” section below for more information.

Instead, let your doctor know if you’re having breathing problems between Breo Ellipta doses. They’ll prescribe a rescue inhaler for managing immediate breathing problems.

How many doses of Breo Ellipta are there in an inhaler?

Each Breo Ellipta inhaler comes with two foil strips of blister packs. Each foil strip contains one of the active ingredients of the drug. (That is, one strip contains fluticasone furoate and the other vilanterol trifenatate.)

Each strip has 30 blisters, which provides a 30-day supply of Breo Ellipta.

Until you’re ready to take a dose of Breo Ellipta, don’t open the inhaler or foil strips. This might cause you to lose a dose of the drug.

Will my dosage of Breo Ellipta be different if I have glaucoma?

Maybe. The manufacturer of Breo Ellipta hasn’t provided specific dosage recommendations for people with glaucoma.

But taking Breo Ellipta may increase your risk of glaucoma or other eye-related problems, such as cataracts. Studies have shown drugs that include an inhaled corticosteroid, such as Breo Ellipta, can increase eye pressure and cause eye-related problems.

If you already have glaucoma or other serious eye conditions, your doctor will discuss whether Breo Ellipta is safe for you to use.

Your doctor may have you visit an eye doctor to check your eyes before and during treatment with Breo Ellipta.

If you develop eye problems while using Breo Ellipta, tell your doctor. In some cases, this drug may not be right for you.

If you miss a dose of Breo Ellipta, take it as soon as you remember. But do not take two doses of the drug to make up for missing a dose. This can increase your risk of side effects. Try to take your dose of Breo Ellipta at the same time every day.

If you need help remembering to take your dose of Breo Ellipta, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or a timer, or downloading a reminder app on your phone.

The dosage of Breo Ellipta you’re prescribed may depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Breo Ellipta to treat
  • other conditions you may have (see “Dosage adjustments” under “What is Breo Ellipta’s dosage?”)

Your doctor will prescribe the dose that’s best for your condition. They’ll prescribe the lowest dose that helps manage your symptoms to minimize side effects of the drug. Ask your doctor about your dosage of Breo Ellipta if you have questions.

Breo Ellipta comes as an inhaler containing a powder that you inhale. It has two active ingredients and comes in two strengths. For more information, see the “What is Breo Ellipta’s dosage?” section above.

You take a dose of Breo Ellipta by inhaling it through your mouth and into your lungs. When you begin treatment, your doctor or pharmacist will show you how to use the Breo Ellipta inhaler to take your dose. You can also watch this video from the manufacturer that shows how to take a dose of the drug.

Do not take two doses of Breo at one time, even if you think you didn’t take your dose properly.

After you use your Brio Ellipta inhaler, be sure to rinse your mouth with water and spit without swallowing. This helps lower the risk of a side effect called oral thrush, which is a yeast infection that can happen in your mouth or throat.

If you have trouble using your Breo Ellipta inhaler, ask your doctor or pharmacist to show you how to use the device correctly.

Do not use more Breo Ellipta than your doctor prescribes. Using more than this can lead to serious side effects.

Some possible symptoms of overdose include:

What to do in case you use too much Breo Ellipta

Call your doctor right away if you think you’ve used too much Breo Ellipta. Depending on your symptoms, you may need monitoring for heart-related problems.

You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers, or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, call 911 (or your local emergency number) immediately or go to the nearest emergency room.

The sections above describe the typical Breo Ellipta dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Breo Ellipta for you, they’ll prescribe the dosage that’s right for you.

Remember, you shouldn’t change your dosage of Breo Ellipta without your doctor’s recommendation. Only use Breo Ellipta exactly as prescribed. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your current dosage.

Here are some examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Should my dosage of Breo Ellipta change if the drug isn’t working for my condition?
  • Will my dosage of Breo Ellipta be different if I use a rescue inhaler for asthma?
  • Does my dosage of Breo Ellipta need to change if I have serious liver problems?

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Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.