Toujeo is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Toujeo contains a form of insulin called insulin glargine, which is classified as a long-acting insulin.

Clinical studies tested Toujeo in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The studies showed that after 26 weeks of treatment, Toujeo lowered fasting blood sugar levels by 17 to 61 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 0.4 to 1.42.

Toujeo is available in two different prefilled pens that are used to inject insulin under the skin (subcutaneous).

  • Toujeo SoloStar: This pen contains 450 units of insulin glargine in 1.5 mL of solution. It can give up to 80 units of insulin glargine in a single injection.
  • Toujeo Max SoloStar: This pen contains 900 units of insulin glargine in 3 mL of solution. It can give up to 160 units of insulin glargine in a single injection.

Toujeo is a brand-name drug. It’s not currently available as a generic drug.

Toujeo contains a long-acting form of insulin called insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is also available as the brand-name drugs Lantus and Basaglar.

Toujeo can cause mild or serious side effects. The following list contains some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Toujeo. This list doesn’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Toujeo, or tips on how to deal with a troubling side effect, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of Toujeo can include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • cough
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention, with swelling of your arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, or itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

If these side effects are severe, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Toujeo aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Severely low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Symptoms can include:
    • fatigue
    • hunger
    • dizziness
    • sweating
    • shaking
    • blurry vision
    • confusion
    • headache
    • irritability
    • loss of consciousness and coma
  • Low potassium levels (hypokalemia). Symptoms can include:
    • fatigue
    • muscle cramps
    • weakness
    • rapid heartbeat
    • pounding chest
    • heart arrhythmia
  • Severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:
    • trouble breathing
    • itchy skin
    • flushing
    • rash
    • anxiety
    • swelling of mouth and throat

Rash

Rash, or redness and itching, sometimes occurs around the injection site in people who use Toujeo. It’s not known how often this occurs.

Weight gain or loss

Weight gain can occur in some people who use Toujeo. This is a side effect that can happen with all insulin products. How much weight gain occurs with Toujeo isn’t clear. In studies of a similar type of insulin (Lantus), weight gain of up to about 2 pounds occurred over 28 weeks of treatment.

Weight loss isn’t a side effect that has occurred in studies of Toujeo.

Hypoglycemia

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is one of the most common side effects of all types of insulin, including Toujeo.

In studies of people taking Toujeo, mild hypoglycemia occurred in up to 69 percent of people with type 1 diabetes, and up to 37 percent of those with type 2 diabetes.

Severe hypoglycemia occurred in about 5 percent to 7 percent of people with either type of diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia was greater for people who received Toujeo in combination with other types of insulin.

If you often have low blood sugar levels or have severe hypoglycemia while taking Toujeo, talk with your doctor about changing your dosage.

Heart failure

Taking Toujeo along with certain diabetes medications can increase your risk of heart failure, or worsen symptoms if you already have heart failure. These drugs are called thiazolidinediones and include Actos and Avandia.

Symptoms of heart failure can include:

  • shortness of breath
  • sudden weight gain
  • swollen ankles or feet

If you have symptoms of heart failure or worsening symptoms, talk with your doctor. You may need to stop taking thiazolidinediones.

Joint pain

Joint pain isn’t a side effect that has occurred in studies of Toujeo. It has occurred in as much as 14 percent of people taking Lantus, a very similar type of insulin. Therefore, it might also happen in people who take Toujeo.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea isn’t a side effect that has occurred in studies of Toujeo. It has occurred in as much as 11 percent of people taking Lantus, a very similar type of insulin. Therefore, it might also happen in people who take Toujeo.

Toujeo and Lantus are both brand-name drugs that contain a long-acting insulin. In fact, they contain the same ingredient, insulin glargine.

The main difference between Toujeo and Lantus is that Toujeo is more concentrated than Lantus.

(For comparisons of Toujeo with other drugs, see “Toujeo vs. other medications” below.)

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Lantus is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults and children who have type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Lantus are given by an injection under the skin (subcutaneous). They’re both usually given once daily.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Lantus contain the same long-acting insulin ingredient, insulin glargine. Therefore, both medications can cause similar common and serious side effects.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Lantus can include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention, with swelling of your arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, or itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Lantus include:

  • joint pain
  • headache
  • high blood pressure
  • diarrhea
  • depression

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Lantus may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Although these medications can cause mostly similar side effects, there may be some differences. In one study, Toujeo was less likely to cause hypoglycemia than Lantus.

Researchers in one study found that people taking Toujeo had less weight gain than people taking Lantus. However, in another study, there was no difference in the amount of weight gain between the two drugs.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Lantus have been directly compared in several studies. These studies show that Toujeo and Lantus work about equally well for decreasing fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. (They haven’t been compared for use in children.)

A difference between these drugs is that Toujeo may work for a longer time than Lantus. Toujeo lasts up to 36 hours, while Lantus works for 20 to 24 hours. Toujeo may also cause more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day, with fewer low or high blood sugar events.

Costs

Toujeo and Lantus are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms.

Toujeo may cost slightly less than Lantus. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

The Toujeo dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the condition you’re using Toujeo to treat
  • your age
  • your weight
  • your diet and level of physical activity
  • whether you’re already taking insulin
  • your blood glucose level goals

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage and adjust it over time to reach the dosage that’s right for you.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Forms and strengths

Toujeo is available in two different prefilled pens that are used to deliver insulin with an injection under the skin (subcutaneous).

Toujeo pens

  • Toujeo SoloStar: This pen contains 450 units of insulin glargine in 1.5 mL of solution. It can give up to 80 units of insulin glargine in a single injection.
  • Toujeo Max SoloStar: This pen contains 900 units of insulin glargine in 3 mL of solution. It can give up to 160 units of insulin glargine in a single injection.

Toujeo pen needles

Pen needles must be attached to either type of pen before each injection. Needles aren’t included with the Toujeo pens. The manufacturer of Toujeo recommends using one of the following pen needles:

  • BD Ultra-Fine
  • Ypsomed Clickfine
  • Owen Mumford Unifine Pens

Dosage for type 1 diabetes

Your dosage of Toujeo for type 1 diabetes will depend on whether you’re starting treatment with insulin for the first time or you’re switching from a different insulin product to Toujeo.

Starting insulin for the first time

  • When you’re first starting treatment with insulin, your healthcare provider will calculate a total daily insulin requirement for you. This amount is based on how much you weigh. Usually, the total daily insulin requirement is 0.2 to 0.4 units per kilogram of body weight.
  • About one-third to one-half of your total daily insulin requirement will be given as Toujeo, once daily. The rest of your total daily insulin requirement will be given as a short-acting insulin. You’ll divide it and take it with each of your daily meals.
  • Your healthcare provider will work with you to manage your blood sugar levels. They’ll monitor these levels and adjust your insulin dosage if needed.

Switching insulin treatment to Toujeo

  • When you’re switching from another once-daily, long-acting insulin to Toujeo, your starting dosage of Toujeo would likely be the same as your dosage for the other long-acting insulin. After you switch, your healthcare provider will adjust your dosage of Toujeo, if needed. Most people who switch from Lantus to Toujeo need a higher daily dose of Toujeo than Lantus. This may be because the body absorbs Toujeo more slowly than it absorbs Lantus.
  • When you’re switching from a twice-daily NPH insulin (an intermediate-acting insulin), your Toujeo starting dosage would likely be 80 percent of your total daily NPH insulin dosage. Your healthcare provider will adjust your dosage of Toujeo if needed.

Dosage for type 2 diabetes

Toujeo dosing for type 2 diabetes depends on whether you’re starting treatment with insulin for the first time or you’re switching from a different insulin product to Toujeo.

Starting insulin for the first time

  • Your healthcare provider will calculate your Toujeo dosage based on your body weight. The typical starting dose of Toujeo in people with type 2 diabetes is 0.2 units per kilogram of body weight. This amount is usually taken once daily.
  • If you’re taking other diabetes medications, your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dosage of those medications when you start taking Toujeo.
  • Your healthcare provider will work with you to manage your blood sugar levels. They’ll monitor these levels and adjust your insulin dosage and the dosage of your other diabetes medications if needed.

Switching insulin treatment to Toujeo

  • When you’re switching from another once-daily, long-acting insulin to Toujeo, your starting dosage of Toujeo will likely be the same as the other long-acting insulin. After you switch, your healthcare provider will adjust your dosage of Toujeo, if needed. Most people who switch from Lantus to Toujeo need a higher daily dose of Toujeo than Lantus. This may be because the body absorbs Toujeo more slowly than it absorbs Lantus.
  • When you’re switching from twice-daily NPH insulin, your Toujeo starting dosage would likely be 80 percent of your total daily NPH insulin dosage. Your healthcare provider will adjust your dosage of Toujeo if needed.

What if I miss a dose?

What you should do if you miss a dose depends on when you realize that you’ve missed a dose. If it’s within about two hours of your scheduled dose, it should be OK to go ahead and take your Toujeo dose. You should just be aware that you’ll likely need to adjust the timing of your next dose accordingly.

If it’s been more than two hours since your scheduled dose, talk with your healthcare provider right away. They can advise you on the best approach to control your blood sugar levels.

Be sure not to take a double dose to make up for a missed dose. This can cause dangerous side effects.

It’s a good idea to talk with your doctor in advance about what to do if you miss a dose. They can tell you at what point you should avoid taking the missed dose and instead wait for the next dose.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Yes. Toujeo is used long term to control blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

What should I do if Toujeo isn’t working?

It’s important to remember that it can take up to five days for Toujeo to reach its full effect on your blood sugar levels. Therefore, it may not seem like it’s working when you first start taking it.

But if you’ve already taken it for five days or longer and it still doesn’t seem to be working, talk with your healthcare provider. They may need to adjust your Toujeo dosage.

Dosing tips
  • Your blood sugar levels should be closely monitored when you’re starting or switching to Toujeo.
  • It may take up to five days for Toujeo to have its full effect on lowering your blood sugar levels.
  • Dosage adjustments should only be made every three or four days.
  • Toujeo shouldn’t be diluted or mixed with any other insulin products.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription medications such as Toujeo for certain uses.

Toujeo for diabetes

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Clinical studies tested Toujeo in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The studies showed that after 26 weeks of treatment, Toujeo lowered fasting blood sugar levels by 17 to 61 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 0.4 to 1.42.

Toujeo contains a long-acting insulin called insulin glargine. There are many different types of insulin, which are classified by how fast they work or how long they work. Here’s a table of the different kinds of insulins that are available.

Insulin nameClassificationHow fast does it work?How long does it last?
insulin aspart (NovoLog)rapid-acting and short-acting10 to 30 minutes3 to 5 hours
insulin glulisine (Apidra)rapid-acting and short-acting10 to 30 minutes3 to 5 hours
insulin lispro (Humalog)rapid-acting and short-acting15 to 30 minutes3 to 5 hours
regular insulin (Humulin R, Novolin R)short-acting30 to 60 minutes6 to 10 hours
insulin NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N)intermediate-acting1 to 2 hours10 to 24 hours
insulin glargine U-100 (Lantus, Basaglar)long-acting1 to 2 hours20 to 24 hours
insulin glargine U-300 (Toujeo)long-actingup to 6 hoursup to 36 hours
insulin detemir (Levemir)long-acting1 to 2 hours6 to 24 hours
insulin degludec (Tresiba)long-acting1 hourup to 42 hours

You may wonder how Toujeo compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below are comparisons between Toujeo and several medications.

Toujeo vs. Tresiba

Toujeo and Tresiba are both long-acting insulin products, but they contain different forms of insulin. Toujeo contains insulin glargine, and Tresiba contains insulin degludec.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Tresiba is FDA-approved to control blood sugar in adults and children 1 year of age and older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Toujeo and Tresiba are both available as a prefilled pen that’s used to deliver insulin using an injection under the skin (subcutaneous).

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Tresiba both contain a long-acting insulin ingredient. Therefore, the side effects that they cause are very similar.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Tresiba include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, and bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Tresiba include headache and diarrhea.

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Tresiba may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Although both Toujeo and Tresiba can cause hypoglycemia, Toujeo may have a lower risk of this condition. In one study, Toujeo had a lower risk of hypoglycemia than Tresiba when these medications were first started and dosages were being increased.

In another study, low blood sugar levels at night were less common in people taking Toujeo compared to Tresiba. And in yet another study, the risk of severe low blood sugar and nighttime low blood sugar was lower in people taking Toujeo compared to those taking Tresiba.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Tresiba have been directly compared in several clinical studies. Overall, they were found to be very similar in effectiveness.

In a 2018 study in people with type 2 diabetes, Toujeo and Tresiba worked about equally well for decreasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) after 24 weeks of treatment. Another 2018 study in people with type 2 diabetes also found that Toujeo and Tresiba worked about equally well for lowering blood sugar levels. And there were similar results in yet another 2018 study.

One study evaluated switching people with type 2 diabetes from a long-acting insulin such as Lantus or Levemir, to Toujeo or Tresiba. In this study, making the switch improved HbA1c about equally well in people who switched to Toujeo as people who switched to Tresiba.

Some research did find a difference between the performance of the two drugs. A 2018 analysis of studies found that Toujeo may cause more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day as compared to Tresiba.

Costs

Toujeo and Tresiba are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Tresiba. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Basaglar

Toujeo and Basaglar are both brand-name drugs that contain a long-acting insulin. In fact, they contain the same ingredient, insulin glargine. The main difference between them is that Toujeo is more concentrated than Basaglar.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Basaglar is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with type 1 diabetes, and in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Basaglar are delivered using an injection that’s given under the skin (subcutaneous). They’re also both usually given once daily.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Basaglar contain the same long-acting insulin ingredient, insulin glargine. Therefore, both medications can cause similar common and serious side effects.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Basaglar include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, or itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Basaglar include:

  • joint pain
  • headache
  • high blood pressure
  • diarrhea
  • depression

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Basaglar may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Other differences in side effects

Although these medications can cause mostly similar side effects, there may be some differences.

In one study, people with type 2 diabetes were switched from Lantus to either Basaglar or Toujeo. After the switch, people taking Toujeo had a lower risk of low blood sugar levels compared to Basaglar or Lantus.

This is similar to studies comparing Toujeo and Lantus, which is biologically similar to Basaglar. In one study, Toujeo was less likely to cause hypoglycemia than Lantus.

Researchers in one study found that people taking Toujeo had less weight gain than people taking Lantus. However, in another study, there was no difference in weight gain between the two drugs.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Basaglar have been directly compared in one study. In this study, people with type 2 diabetes were switched from Lantus to either Basaglar or Toujeo. After the switch, both Toujeo and Basaglar worked about equally well for maintaining blood sugar control.

Toujeo has also been directly compared to Lantus, which is biologically similar to Basaglar. (Lantus and Basaglar are expected to have the same effects.) These studies show that Toujeo and Lantus work about equally well for decreasing fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

One difference is that Toujeo may work longer than Lantus or Basaglar. Toujeo lasts up to 36 hours, while Lantus and Basaglar last for 20 to 24 hours. Toujeo may also cause more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day, with fewer low or high blood sugar events.

Costs

Toujeo and Basaglar are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Basaglar may cost slightly less than Toujeo. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Levemir

Toujeo and Levemir are both long-acting insulin products, but they contain different forms of insulin. Toujeo contains insulin glargine, and Levemir contains insulin detemir.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Levemir is FDA-approved to control blood sugar in adults and children 2 years of age and older with type 1 diabetes or adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Levemir are given by an injection under the skin (subcutaneous). They’re also both usually given once daily.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Levemir both contain a long-acting insulin ingredient. Therefore, the side effects that they can cause are very similar.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Levemir include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Levemir include:

  • headache
  • back pain
  • fever
  • diarrhea
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Levemir may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Levemir haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, an indirect comparison found that Toujeo and Levemir may work about equally well for decreasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).

Costs

Toujeo and Levemir are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Levemir. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Trulicity

Toujeo is a long-acting insulin product that contains insulin glargine. Trulicity, which contains the drug dulaglutide, is classified as a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Trulicity is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. It’s not used for people with type 1 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Trulicity are given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). Toujeo is given once daily. Trulicity is given once weekly.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Trulicity have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

Toujeo and TrulicityToujeoTrulicity
More common side effects• pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
• respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
• low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
• fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
• weight gain
• skin thickening or pits at the injection sites
• nausea
• diarrhea
• vomiting
• stomach pain
• decreased appetite
• weight loss
• fatigue
Serious side effects• severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
• severe allergic reaction
• low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
• heart arrhythmia
•pancreatitis
• kidney damage
• thyroid cancer*

*Trulicity has a boxed warning from the FDA about this side effect. This is the strongest warning the FDA requires. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Some people wonder how diabetes medications will affect their weight. In studies of Toujeo, some people gained weight. In studies of Trulicity, some people lost weight, ranging from about 3 pounds to 5 pounds over 26 weeks.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Trulicity haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. This is likely because they’re meant for people with different treatment needs.

According to treatment guidelines, Trulicity is considered a first-choice treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes who can’t take metformin. And long-acting insulin, such as Toujeo, is recommended when one or more other drugs, such as Trulicity or metformin, don’t lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) enough.

Costs

Toujeo and Trulicity are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Trulicity. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Alcohol should be avoided, or consumed carefully, while taking Toujeo. Drinking alcohol can increase or decrease blood sugar levels.

If you drink alcohol while taking Toujeo, you should monitor your blood sugar levels more closely.

Toujeo can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some can interfere with how well a drug works, while others can cause increased side effects.

Toujeo and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Toujeo. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Toujeo.

Before taking Toujeo, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Drugs that increase the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

When taken with Toujeo, some medications can cause low blood sugar levels and increase the risk of hypoglycemia. If you take these medications, you may need to check your blood sugar levels more often. Also, your doctor may need to change your dosage of Toujeo.

Examples of these medications include:

Drugs that increase your blood sugar levels

Some medications can increase blood sugar levels in your body. If you take these medications, you may need to check your blood sugar levels more often. Also, your doctor may need to change your dosage of Toujeo.

Examples of these medications include:

  • albuterol (ProAir, Proventil, Ventolin)
  • budesonide (Entocort EC, Pulmicort, Uceris)
  • clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo)
  • fluticasone (Arnuity, Flonase)
  • levothyroxine (Levoxyl, Synthroid, Tirosint, Unithroid)
  • mometasone (Asmanex, Elocon, Nasonex)
  • niacin (Niaspan, Slo-Niacin, others)
  • olanzapine (Zyprexa)
  • oral contraceptives (birth control pills)

Toujeo and herbs and supplements

When taken with Toujeo, some herbs and supplements might increase your risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Examples include:

  • alpha-lipoic acid
  • banaba
  • bitter melon
  • chromium
  • gymnema
  • prickly pear cactus
  • white mulberry

You should take Toujeo according to your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Timing

Toujeo is taken once daily. It should be taken at about the same time each day. Your healthcare provider may recommend taking it in the morning before breakfast, or in the evening before dinner.

Taking Toujeo with food

Toujeo doesn’t need to be taken with food or at the time of a meal.

However, people with diabetes need to follow consistent diet, exercise, and insulin schedules, which would include treatment with Toujeo. These schedules may be different for each person. Your healthcare provider can tell you more.

For people with type 1 diabetes, their bodies don’t produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, usually have insulin resistance. This means their body doesn’t respond to insulin the way it should. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may also stop producing enough insulin.

Toujeo helps improve blood sugar levels in people with either type of diabetes.

How insulin affects blood sugar

Normally, when you eat food, your body releases insulin to help transport glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into the cells of your body. The cells then turn the glucose into energy.

When your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or when your body doesn’t respond to insulin the way it should, this causes problems. The cells of your body may not get the glucose they need to work correctly.

Also, you may get too much glucose in your blood. This is called high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Having too much glucose in your blood can damage your body and organs, including your eyes, heart, nerves, and kidneys.

What Toujeo does

Toujeo is a type of insulin called insulin glargine. It’s a long-acting insulin, which means it works for the whole day (up to 36 hours).

Toujeo is used to partly replace the body’s natural production of insulin, which will help move glucose into your cells. This helps your cells get the sugar they need. It also helps stabilize your blood sugar levels.

Toujeo is often used with other medications. For instance, for type 2 diabetes, it may be used with metformin. And for type 1 diabetes, it may be used with a type of insulin that’s taken with meals.

How long does it take to work?

Toujeo doesn’t work right away. When you first start taking the drug, it can take up to five days to reach its full effect.

Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar pens should be refrigerated until you start using them. They shouldn’t be stored with the needle attached.

Refrigeration

Be sure to keep Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar pens in the refrigerator until you use them. When the pens are in use, keep them at room temperature.

The pens can stay at room temperature for up to 42 days. After the needles have been at room temperature for 42 days, you shouldn’t use them. You should dispose of them at that time. And once you take the pens out of the refrigerator for use, don’t put them back in the refrigerator.

Also, don’t freeze the pens. If a pen becomes frozen, don’t use it. Dispose of it.

Shelf life

Each Toujeo package has an expiration date. Toujeo shouldn’t be used if it has gone beyond the expiration date.

There are no studies of Toujeo use during pregnancy. An analysis of studies of insulin glargine, the insulin contained in Toujeo, didn’t find any negative effects in mother or fetus when it was used during pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant while taking Toujeo, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits. Your body’s insulin requirements may change during pregnancy. If you’ll be using Toujeo, your dosage may need to be different during your pregnancy.

Toujeo is considered safe to use during breastfeeding. However, your body’s insulin requirements may change during pregnancy. So, your doctor may need to change your Toujeo dosage while you’re breastfeeding.

Be sure to talk to your doctor first if you want to breastfeed while taking Toujeo.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Toujeo.

Is Toujeo the same thing as Lantus?

No. Toujeo isn’t the same as Lantus, but they’re very similar. Both Toujeo and Lantus contain the same long-acting insulin, insulin glargine. But Toujeo contains 300 units per mL of solution, while Lantus contains 100 units per mL of solution.

Toujeo is more concentrated than Lantus.

Is Toujeo a fast-acting insulin?

No, Toujeo isn’t fast-acting. It has a slow onset. When you first start taking Toujeo, it can take up to five days to take full effect on your blood sugar levels.

But Toujeo is long-acting. It can work for up to 36 hours in your body.

When does Toujeo peak?

Toujeo, like other long-acting insulins, doesn’t have a peak. It mimics the body’s natural steady release of insulin throughout the day.

Can I mix Toujeo with other insulins?

No. Toujeo shouldn’t be mixed with other insulins.

How do I switch from another type of insulin to Toujeo?

This depends on the other form of insulin that you’re taking. Talk with your healthcare provider about the best way to switch.

Usually, when switching from another once-daily, long-acting insulin to Toujeo, the starting dosage of Toujeo is the same as the dosage for the other long-acting insulin. If needed, your healthcare provider will work with you to adjust your dosage of Toujeo after your switch.

However, most people who switch from Lantus to Toujeo need a higher daily dose of Toujeo than Lantus. This is probably because your body absorbs Toujeo more slowly than it absorbs Lantus.

When switching from twice-daily NPH insulin, the typical Toujeo starting dosage is 80 percent of the total daily NPH insulin dose. Your healthcare provider will adjust your dosage of Toujeo if needed.

Toujeo burns when I inject it — am I doing something wrong?

When injecting Toujeo, it’s common to feel a small amount of pain, such as a stinging or burning sensation.

One way to decrease this discomfort is to take your Toujeo pen out of the refrigerator at least one hour before giving an injection. The injection hurts more when the solution is cold.

Taking too much of this medication can increase your risk of serious side effects.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose of Toujeo can include:

  • fatigue
  • hunger
  • dizziness
  • sweating
  • shaking
  • blurry vision
  • confusion
  • headache
  • irritability
  • loss of consciousness and coma
  • fatigue
  • muscle cramps
  • weakness
  • rapid heartbeat
  • pounding chest
  • heart arrhythmia

What to do in case of an overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or seek guidance from the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or through their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Before taking Toujeo, talk with your doctor about any medical conditions you have. Toujeo may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions. Examples of these conditions include:

  • Kidney or liver disease: People with these conditions have a higher risk of low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) while taking Toujeo. If you have kidney or liver disease, talk with your doctor about steps you can take to prevent low blood sugar levels.
  • Heart failure: Taking Toujeo along with certain diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones, such as Actos or Avandia, can worsen symptoms of heart failure. If you have heart failure and your symptoms get worse, talk with your doctor. You may need to stop taking thiazolidinediones.

Each Toujeo package has an expiration date listed on the label. Don’t use Toujeo if the expiration date listed on the label has passed.

Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar pens also shouldn’t be used if they’ve been kept at room temperature for more than 42 days.

The pens should be refrigerated until you start using them. During use, they should be left at room temperature. The pens can stay at room temperature for up to 42 days.

Once you take the pens out of the refrigerator for use, don’t put them back in the refrigerator.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Mechanism of action

Toujeo contains insulin glargine U-300. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, or basal, insulin. Insulin glargine, like other insulins, lowers blood glucose by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and decreasing glucose production in the liver. It also inhibits the breakdown of glucose, fat, and proteins.

The insulin glargine U-300 onset of action occurs over a period of six hours and has a duration of action of about 36 hours.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

The median time to maximum insulin concentration following subcutaneous injection of Toujeo is 12 hours. Steady state concentration occurs within five days.

Contraindications

Toujeo should not be used by people who are allergic to insulin glargine or excipients of Toujeo.

Toujeo should not be used during episodes of hypoglycemia.

Storage

Toujeo SoloStar and Toujeo Max SoloStar pens can be refrigerated but should not be frozen. Frozen pens must be discarded.

Once Toujeo is taken out of the refrigerator for use, it should not be placed back in the refrigerator. Toujeo may be stored at room temperature for up to 42 days. After 42 days at room temperature, Toujeo pens must be discarded.

Toujeo should not be stored with the needle attached.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.