Farxiga is a brand-name prescription medication that contains the drug dapagliflozin. Farxiga is used to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. It comes as a tablet you take by mouth.

Farxiga belongs to a class of medications called sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

In clinical studies, Farxiga decreased fasting blood sugar levels by 28.8 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 0.9 percent after 24 weeks of treatment. About 44 to 51 percent of people in the studies who took Farxiga for 24 weeks reached their goal HbA1c of less than 7 percent.

Farxiga can be used by itself or along with other diabetes medications.

Farxiga is only available as a brand-name drug. It contains the drug dapagliflozin, which isn’t currently available in generic form.

Farxiga can cause mild or serious side effects. The following list contains some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Farxiga. This list doesn’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Farxiga, or tips on how to deal with a troubling side effect, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of Farxiga can include:

  • vaginal yeast infection
  • respiratory infections such as the common cold or the flu
  • urinary tract infection
  • increased urination
  • genital infection in men
  • back pain
  • nausea
  • increased cholesterol levels

Some of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Farxiga aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Dehydration and low blood pressure. Symptoms can include:
    • dizziness
    • feeling faint
    • lightheadedness
    • weakness, especially when you stand up
  • Ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine). Symptoms can include:
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • pain in your abdomen (belly)
    • tiredness
    • trouble breathing
  • Kidney damage. Symptoms can include:
    • reduced urination
    • swelling in your legs or ankles
    • confusion
  • Serious urinary tract infections. Symptoms can include:
    • burning sensation when urinating
    • the need to urinate more often
    • the need to urinate right away
    • pain in the lower part of your abdomen (belly)
    • blood in your urine
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms can include:
    • drowsiness
    • headache
    • confusion
    • weakness
    • hunger
    • irritability
    • sweating
    • feeling jittery
    • fast heartbeat
  • Fournier’s gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum). Symptoms can include:
    • pain, tenderness, swelling, or reddening in the genital or rectal area
    • fever
    • malaise (overall feeling of discomfort)
  • Severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include:
    • rash
    • itchy skin
    • flushing
    • swelling
    • trouble breathing

Weight loss

A beneficial side effect of Farxiga is weight loss. In clinical studies, people taking Farxiga lost up to about 7 pounds over 24 weeks of treatment.

Farxiga should only be used according to your doctor’s prescription. You shouldn’t use Farxiga without your doctor’s guidance.

Back pain

In clinical studies, back pain occurred in up to 4 percent of people taking Farxiga. This side effect may go away with continued used of the drug. If you have back pain that doesn’t go away or becomes severe, talk with your doctor.

Yeast infection

Farxiga can increase your risk of genital yeast infection. In clinical studies, yeast infection occurred in up to about 8 percent of women and about 3 percent in men taking Farxiga.

If you’ve never had a yeast infection before and think you might have one, see your doctor for a diagnosis and treatment.

Rash

Some men who take Farxiga can get a genital yeast infection (see “Yeast infection” above), which can cause a rash or redness on the penis. In clinical studies, this happened in about 3 percent of people who took Farxiga.

If you take Farxiga and get a rash or redness on your penis, talk to your doctor. They may prescribe a medication to treat the infection.

Farxiga can also cause rash as part of an allergic reaction. In clinical studies, serious allergic reactions including skin rash, hives, and swelling occurred in about 0.3 percent of people taking Farxiga. In some cases, symptoms also included trouble breathing and swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat.

If you have an allergic reaction to this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center right away. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Urinary tract infection (UTI)

Farxiga can increase your risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). In clinical studies, UTI occurred in up to about 6 percent of people taking the drug.

If you think you might have a UTI, see your doctor for a diagnosis and treatment.

Ketoacidosis

Although uncommon, some people who take Farxiga can develop a serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis.

This condition occurs when the cells of your body aren’t getting the glucose they need for energy. Instead, your body uses fat for energy, which can cause high levels of chemicals in your blood called ketones. Also, your blood can become too acidic.

In severe cases, this condition can cause coma or death.

The first symptoms of ketoacidosis typically include:

  • thirst and dry mouth
  • urinating more often than usual
  • high blood sugar levels
  • high levels of ketones in your urine

Later symptoms may include:

  • nausea and vomiting
  • pain in your abdomen (belly)
  • weakness or fatigue
  • fruity-smelling breath
  • trouble breathing
  • confusion

If you have any of these symptoms, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Kidney damage

Farxiga can increase your risk of kidney damage. This effect didn’t occur in clinical tests of Farxiga, but later reports have mentioned it.

Kidney problems are more likely to occur if you’re dehydrated, have kidney or heart problems, or are over the age of 65 years. They’re also more likely if you take other medications that affect your kidneys.

Before you start taking Farxiga, your doctor will test how well your kidneys are working. If you have kidney problems, you may not be able to take Farxiga.

Your doctor may also test your kidney function from time to time during your treatment with Farxiga. If they detect any problems with your kidneys, they may stop your treatment with the drug.

Bladder cancer

There may be a connection between Farxiga and bladder cancer, but it’s not certain.

In clinical studies, more people taking Farxiga had bladder cancer compared to people taking a placebo.

In 22 studies, 6,045 people took Farxiga and 10 had bladder cancer. In the 3,512 people who took a placebo or a comparison drug, one person had bladder cancer.

However, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there isn’t enough information to know if Farxiga was the cause of bladder cancer in these cases.

Fournier’s gangrene

While it hasn’t occurred in clinical studies of Farxiga, a condition called Fournier’s gangrene has been reported in people using Farxiga and other drugs in its class.

Also called necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum, it’s an infection of the area between the genitals and the rectum. This condition is rare but can be life-threatening, and it can affect both men and women.

Fournier’s gangrene requires immediate care, which could include medication, hospitalization, or surgery. If you’re taking Farxiga and have symptoms of this condition, call your doctor right away. Symptoms can include:

  • pain, tenderness, swelling, or reddening in the genital or rectal area
  • fever
  • malaise (overall feeling of discomfort)

Heart failure

People with diabetes have a higher risk of heart problems, including heart failure. However, heart failure isn’t a side effect that has occurred in clinical studies of Farxiga. In fact, some clinical research shows that Farxiga may decrease the risk of heart problems, including heart attack and heart failure.

Hair loss

Hair loss isn’t a side effect that has occurred in clinical studies of Farxiga.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea isn’t a side effect that has occurred in clinical studies of Farxiga.

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis isn’t a side effect that has occurred in clinical studies of Farxiga.

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage of Farxiga and may increase it to reach the dosage that’s right for you. Their goal will be the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Farxiga comes as a tablet you take by mouth. It’s available in two strengths: 5 mg and 10 mg.

Dosage for type 2 diabetes

The typical starting dosage is 5 mg once daily, taken in the morning. If this dosage doesn’t lower your blood sugar levels enough (and doesn’t cause troubling side effects), your doctor may increase the dosage to 10 mg once daily.

The maximum dosage is 10 mg once daily.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it’s almost time for your next dose, just take that one dose. Don’t try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This can cause dangerous side effects.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Yes. Farxiga is used long term for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Do I need to take this drug with food?

Farxiga can be taken with or without food.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Farxiga to treat certain conditions. Farxiga may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Farxiga for type 2 diabetes

Farxiga is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This is the only condition Farxiga is approved to treat.

Farxiga for type 1 diabetes

Farxiga is sometimes used off-label to treat type 1 diabetes. In clinical studies, Farxiga reduced blood sugar levels, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and total daily insulin doses in people with type 1 diabetes.

While Farxiga isn’t approved as a weight-loss medication, weight loss is a beneficial side effect of the drug.

In clinical studies, people taking Farxiga lost up to about 7 pounds over 24 weeks of treatment. Because of this side effect, your doctor may recommend Farxiga if you have type 2 diabetes and are also overweight.

It’s thought that Farxiga causes weight loss because it sends extra glucose (sugar) from your blood into your urine. That means the calories from the glucose leave your body in your urine, which may lead to weight loss.

Note: Farxiga should only be used according to your doctor’s prescription. You shouldn’t use Farxiga for weight loss or any other purpose without your doctor’s guidance.

Farxiga can be used alone or along with other diabetes medications to treat type 2 diabetes. If a single drug, such as Farxiga, doesn’t lower your blood sugar or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels enough, your doctor may prescribe two or more diabetes drugs.

Examples of other diabetes drugs that may be used with Farxiga include:

Farxiga and metformin

Farxiga and metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet) are commonly used together to treat type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, taking Farxiga plus metformin reduced blood sugar levels, HbA1c, and weight more than when either drug was taken by itself.

Farxiga and Bydureon

Farxiga is sometimes used with Bydureon (exenatide) to treat type 2 diabetes. In one study, taking Farxiga plus Bydureon reduced HbA1c more than when either drug was taken by itself.

Farxiga and glimepiride

Farxiga is sometimes used with glimepiride (Amaryl) to treat type 2 diabetes. In a study, taking Farxiga and glimepiride together reduced fasting blood sugar levels, HbA1c, and weight more than when glimepiride was taken alone.

Avoid drinking too much alcohol while taking Farxiga. Alcohol can change your blood sugar levels and increase your risk of low blood sugar.

If you drink alcohol, talk to your doctor about how much alcohol is safe for you while taking Farxiga.

Farxiga can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some can interfere with how well a drug works, while others can cause increased side effects.

Farxiga and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Farxiga. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Farxiga.

Before taking Farxiga, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Drugs that increase the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

Taking Farxiga with certain medications can lower your blood sugar levels and increase your risk of hypoglycemia. If you take these medications, you may need to check your blood sugar levels more often. Also, your doctor may need to change the dosage of your diabetes medications.

Examples of these medications include:

Drugs that increase blood sugar levels

Taking Farxiga with certain medications can increase your blood sugar levels. This can cancel out some or all of the effects of Farxiga. If you take these medications, you may need to check your blood sugar levels more often. Also, your doctor may need to increase your Farxiga dosage.

Examples of these medications include:

Drugs that lower blood pressure

Taking Farxiga with certain medications that decrease blood pressure may cause your blood pressure to become too low. It may also increase your risk of kidney damage.

Examples of these medications include:

Farxiga and herbs and supplements

Taking certain herbs and supplements with Farxiga may increase your risk of low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Examples of these include:

Other drugs are available that can treat type 2 diabetes. Some may be better suited for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Farxiga, talk to your doctor to learn more about other medications that may work well for you.

Some of these alternative medications are in the same class as Farxiga, and others are in different drug classes. Examples of these drugs include:

  • sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, such as:
    • canagliflozin (Invokana)
    • empagliflozin (Jardiance)
    • ertugliflozin (Steglatro)
  • incretin mimetics/glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists, such as:
    • dulaglutide (Trulicity)
    • exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta)
    • liraglutide (Victoza)
    • lixisenatide (Adlyxin)
    • semaglutide (Ozempic)
    • metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet), which is a biguanide
  • dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, such as:
    • alogliptin (Nesina)
    • linagliptin (Tradjenta)
    • saxagliptin (Onglyza)
    • sitagliptin (Januvia)
  • thiazolidinediones, such as:
    • pioglitazone (Actos)
    • rosiglitazone (Avandia)
  • alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, such as:
  • sulfonylureas, such as:

You may wonder how Farxiga compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below are comparisons between Farxiga and several medications.

Farxiga vs. Jardiance

Farxiga and Jardiance (empagliflozin) are both in the same class of medications: sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. This means they work in the same way to treat type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Both Farxiga and Jardiance are FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Jardiance is also FDA-approved to reduce the risk of heart disease-related death in people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Drug forms and administration

Both Farxiga and Jardiance come as tablets that are taken by mouth, once daily in the morning.

Side effects and risks

Farxiga and Jardiance have similar effects in the body and therefore cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

More common side effects that can occur with both Farxiga and Jardiance include:

  • vaginal yeast infection
  • respiratory infections such as the common cold or flu
  • urinary tract infection
  • increased urination
  • genital infection in men
  • back pain
  • nausea
  • increased cholesterol levels

Serious side effects

Serious side effects that can occur with both Farxiga and Jardiance include:

  • dehydration and low blood pressure
  • ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine)
  • kidney damage*
  • serious urinary tract infections
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

* Both Farxiga and Jardiance can cause kidney damage. However, an analysis of studies found that the risk of kidney damage may be higher in people who take Farxiga compared to those who take Jardiance.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Farxiga and Jardiance are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating this condition hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, they have been indirectly compared in several analyses of clinical studies.

The effects of Farxiga and Jardiance on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) are very similar. But a 2016 analysis of studies found that Jardiance may reduce HbA1c slightly more than Farxiga does. Another 2016 analysis also found that Jardiance may reduce HbA1c a little more than Farxiga does.

The two drugs have also been compared in other areas:

  • Reducing heart risks: A 2017 analysis found that Jardiance may reduce the risk of heart failure and dying from heart disease in people who have type 2 diabetes. This benefit wasn’t found for Farxiga.
  • Lowering blood pressure: Both Farxiga and Jardiance can reduce blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes. One analysis found that Jardiance and Farxiga worked about equally well to reduce blood pressure.
  • Causing weight loss: Both Farxiga and Jardiance can also reduce weight in people with type 2 diabetes. In an analysis of studies, the two drugs worked about equally well for weight loss.

Costs

Both Farxiga and Jardiance are available as brand-name drugs. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Farxiga may cost a little more than Jardiance. The exact price you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Farxiga vs. Invokana

Farxiga and Invokana (canagliflozin) are both in the same class of medications: sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. This means they work in the same way to treat type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Both Farxiga and Invokana are FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Farxiga and Invokana come as tablets that are taken by mouth, once daily in the morning.

Side effects and risks

Farxiga and Invokana have similar effects in the body, and therefore cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Farxiga and InvokanaFarxigaInvokana
More common side effects• urinary tract infection
• increased urination
• nausea
• vaginal yeast infection
• genital infection in men
• increased cholesterol
• constipation
• respiratory infections such as the common cold or flu
• back pain
• thirst
Serious side effects• dehydration and low blood pressure
ketoacidosis (increased ketones in blood or urine)
• kidney damage
• serious urinary tract infections
• low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
• severe allergic reaction
(few unique serious side effects)• high potassium levels
• bone fracture
• limb amputation*
* Invokana has a boxed warning from the FDA about limb amputation. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Farxiga and Invokana are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating type 2 diabetes hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, they have been indirectly compared in analyses of clinical studies.

The effects of Farxiga and Invokana on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) have been found to be similar. But a 2016 analysis of studies found that Invokana may reduce HbA1c more than Farxiga does. Another 2016 analysis also found that Invokana may reduce HbA1c more than Farxiga does.

The two drugs have also been compared in other areas:

  • Lowering blood pressure: Both Farxiga and Invokana can reduce blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes. One analysis found that Invokana and Farxiga worked about equally well to reduce blood pressure.
  • Causing weight loss: Both Farxiga and Invokana can reduce weight in people with type 2 diabetes. In an analysis of studies, people taking Invokana had slightly more weight loss than people taking Farxiga.

Costs

Both Farxiga and Invokana are available as brand-name drugs. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Farxiga and Invokana cost about the same amount. The exact price you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Farxiga vs. Januvia

Farxiga and Januvia (sitagliptin) belong to different drug classes. Farxiga is a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. Januvia is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor.

These drugs work in different ways to treat type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Both Farxiga and Januvia are FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Farxiga and Januvia come as tablets that are taken by mouth, once daily.

Side effects and risks

Farxiga and Januvia have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

Farxiga and JanuviaFarxigaJanuvia
More common side effects• nausea
• respiratory infections such as the common cold or flu
• vaginal yeast infection
• urinary tract infection
• increased urination
• genital infection in men
• back pain
• increased cholesterol
• constipation
• headache
• swelling of feet and legs (peripheral edema)
• stomach pain
• diarrhea
Serious side effects• severe allergic reaction
• kidney damage
• low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
• dehydration and low blood pressure
ketoacidosis (increased ketones in blood or urine)
• serious urinary tract infections
pancreatitis
• heart failure
• severe joint pain
• severe skin reaction (bullous pemphigoid)

Effectiveness

The only condition that both Farxiga and Januvia are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating this condition hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies.

In an indirect comparison, Farxiga and Januvia worked about equally well for reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, Farxiga had the additional benefit of weight loss. Januvia didn’t reduce weight.

Costs

Both Farxiga and Januvia are available as brand-name drugs. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Januvia may cost less than Farxiga. The exact price you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Farxiga vs. Victoza

Farxiga and Victoza (liraglutide) belong to different drug classes. Farxiga is a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. Victoza is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

These drugs work in different ways to treat type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Both Farxiga and Victoza are FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Victoza is also FDA-approved to reduce the risk of heart disease–related problems in people who have type 2 diabetes and heart disease. These problems include heart attack and stroke.

Drug forms and administration

Farxiga comes as a tablet that’s taken by mouth once daily in the morning.

Victoza comes as a solution that’s self-injected under the skin (subcutaneous) once daily.

Side effects and risks

Farxiga and Victoza have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

Farxiga and VictozaFarxigaVictoza
More common side effects• nausea
• respiratory infections such as the common cold or flu
• back pain
• constipation
• vaginal yeast infection
• urinary tract infection
• increased urination
• genital infection in men
• increased cholesterol
• diarrhea
• headache
• vomiting
• decreased appetite
• stomach upset
• injection site reactions
Serious side effects• kidney damage
• severe allergic reaction
• low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
• dehydration and low blood pressure
ketoacidosis (increased ketones in blood or urine)
• serious urinary tract infections
pancreatitis
gallbladder disease
• thyroid cancer*
* Victoza has a boxed warning from the FDA about thyroid cancer. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Farxiga and Victoza are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating this condition hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies.

However, an indirect comparison found that Farxiga may reduce hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) more than GLP-1 receptor agonists, such as Victoza, do.

Costs

Both Farxiga and Victoza are available as brand-name drugs. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Farxiga typically costs less than Victoza. The exact price you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Farxiga vs. glipizide

Farxiga and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) belong to different drug classes. Farxiga is a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. Glipizide is a sulfonylurea.

These drugs work in different ways to treat type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Both Farxiga and glipizide are FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Farxiga comes as a tablet that’s taken by mouth once daily in the morning.

Glipizide comes as a regular-release tablet (Glucotrol) and an extended-release tablet (Glucotrol XL). Both are taken once daily by mouth. Regular-release glipizide is taken 30 minutes before breakfast or the first meal of the day. Extended-release glipizide is taken with breakfast or the first meal of the day.

Side effects and risks

Farxiga and glipizide have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

Farxiga and glipizideFarxigaGlipizide
More common side effects• nausea• vaginal yeast infection
• respiratory infections such as the common cold or flu
• urinary tract infection
• increased urination
• genital infection in men
• back pain
• increased cholesterol
• dizziness
• diarrhea
• tremor
• gas
• nervousness
• weight gain
• headache
• rash or red, itchy skin
Serious side effects• low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)*
• severe allergic reaction
• dehydration and low blood pressure
ketoacidosis (increased ketones in blood or urine)
• kidney damage
• serious urinary tract infections
• liver damage
• blood disorders such as leukopenia or anemia
* Although both Farxiga and glipizide can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), this side effect is more common with glipizide than with Farxiga.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Farxiga drug and glipizide are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating this condition hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies.

However, in an indirect comparison, Farxiga and glipizide worked about equally well for reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). But Farxiga has the additional benefit of weight loss, while glipizide is more likely to cause weight gain.

Costs

Both Farxiga and glipizide are available as brand-name drugs. The brand-name versions of glipizide are Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL. Glipizide is also available in generic form, but Farxiga isn’t. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Farxiga typically costs more than the brand-name and generic versions of glipizide. The exact price you pay for any of these drugs will depend on your insurance plan.

You should take Farxiga according to your doctor’s instructions.

Timing

Farxiga should be taken in the morning.

Taking Farxiga with food

Farxiga can be taken with or without food.

Can Farxiga be crushed?

The manufacturer of Farxiga hasn’t stated whether it’s safe to crush Farxiga. Therefore, it might be safer to avoid crushing it.

Farxiga helps improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

How insulin affects blood sugar

Normally, when you eat food, your body releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps transport glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into the cells of your body. The cells then turn the glucose into energy.

People with type 2 diabetes usually have insulin resistance. This means their body doesn’t respond to insulin the way it should. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may also stop producing enough insulin.

When your body doesn’t respond to insulin the way it should, or if it doesn’t produce enough insulin, this causes problems.

The cells of your body may not get the glucose they need to work correctly. Also, you may get too much glucose in your blood. This is called high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Having too much glucose in your blood can damage your body and organs, including your eyes, heart, nerves, and kidneys.

What Farxiga does

Farxiga belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions.

Farxiga lowers your blood sugar levels by causing your kidneys to get rid of excess sugar in your blood through your urine.

How long does it take to work?

Farxiga begins to work within 30 to 60 minutes of when you take it. It reaches its peak (highest) effect about two hours after taking it.

When you first start taking Farxiga, it may take up to a week to see its full effects on your blood sugar levels.

There are limited studies on this drug’s effects on human pregnancies. However, based on animal studies that have shown that kidney problems can occur in a fetus, Farxiga shouldn’t be used during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy.

During the first trimester, Farxiga should only be used if the potential benefit outweighs the potential risks.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Farxiga during pregnancy.

It isn’t known if Farxiga passes into breast milk. If you’re planning to breastfeed, you and your doctor should decide together whether you should take this drug or breastfeed.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Farxiga.

Do Farxiga and metformin both cause weight loss?

Yes, both Farxiga and metformin can cause weight loss. In clinical studies, people taking Farxiga lost up to about 7 pounds over 24 weeks of treatment. In clinical studies of metformin, mild weight loss has also occurred, usually from less than 1 pound up to about 8 pounds.

When these medications are taken together, people usually lose more weight than when taking these drugs by themselves.

Is Farxiga a diuretic?

No, Farxiga isn’t classified as a diuretic. Farxiga is in a class of medications called sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

However, Farxiga has some effects that are similar to the effects of diuretics. For instance, Farxiga can make you urinate more and can cause dehydration, which diuretics can also do.

Does Farxiga make you tired?

Tiredness isn’t a side effect that has occurred in studies of Farxiga.

Does Farxiga cause constipation?

Yes, it can. Some people who take Farxiga can have constipation. In clinical studies, this effect occurred in about 2 percent of people who took Farxiga.

Taking too much of this medication can increase your risk of serious side effects.

Overdose symptoms

There is very little information about the symptoms you might have if you take too much Farxiga. Possible symptoms of an overdose might include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or seek guidance from the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or through their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Before taking Farxiga, talk with your doctor about your health history. Farxiga may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions. These include:

  • Kidney disease: Farxiga could worsen kidney damage. If your kidney function worsens during your treatment, your doctor may have you stop taking this drug. Don’t take this medication if you have severe kidney disease or if you’re on dialysis.
  • Bladder cancer: Some people who have taken Farxiga have developed bladder cancer. However, there isn’t enough information to know if this drug is the cause. It also isn’t known if this drug affects existing bladder cancer. Until more is known, don’t take this drug if you have bladder cancer.
  • High cholesterol: Farxiga may increase your cholesterol levels. If you already have high cholesterol, your doctor will likely monitor your cholesterol levels closely during your treatment with this drug.

Also, people aged 65 years or older who take this drug may be at an increased risk of certain side effects. These side effects include low blood pressure, dizziness, fainting, low blood pressure when standing, dehydration, and kidney problems.

If you’re in this age group, your doctor will check your blood pressure and kidney function from time to time while you take this medication.

When Farxiga is dispensed from the pharmacy, the pharmacist adds an expiration date to the label on the container. This date is typically one year from the date the medication was dispensed.

The purpose of such expiration dates is to guarantee the effectiveness of the medication during that time.

The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. However, an FDA study showed that many medications may still be good beyond the expiration date listed on the bottle.

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where the medication is stored. Farxiga tablets should be stored at room temperature, between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C).

If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Mechanism of action

Farxiga blocks the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) in the proximal renal tubules. This prevents reabsorption of filtered glucose from the renal tubules. The result is osmotic diuresis due to excess excretion of urinary glucose.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

After oral administration, maximum concentration occurs within two hours. Administration with a high-fat meal reduces the maximum concentration by about 50 percent and increases the time to maximum concentration by about an hour. However, this doesn’t have a clinically significant effect, and Farxiga can be taken with or without food.

The oral bioavailability of Farxiga is 78 percent.

Farxiga is primarily metabolized by UGT1A9. Metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes is considered a minor pathway.

The half-life of Farxiga is about 13 hours.

Contraindications

Farxiga is contraindicated in patients who:

  • have a history of a severe hypersensitivity reaction to Farxiga
  • have severe renal impairment with an eGFR of less than 30 mL/minute/1.73 m2
  • are on dialysis

Storage

Farxiga should be stored at room temperature, between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C).

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.