Stage 2 testicular cancer has spread from your testes to nearby lymph nodes in your abdomen or lower back. A combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy can usually treat it successfully.

Testicular cancer is most often staged using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)’s TNM system. Under this system, testicular cancer is classified from stages 0–3.

Stage 2 testicular cancer is confined to your testicle and nearby lymph nodes up to the retroperitoenum (abdominal cavity) or surrounding tissues. It hasn’t yet spread to distant body parts, like your lungs or brain.

Stage 2 testicular cancer is more difficult to treat than stage 0 or 1, but it still usually has a good outlook.

Read on to learn more about stage 2 testicular cancer.

What are the stages of testicular cancer?

Here’s a look at the four stages of testicular cancer:

  • Stage 0: In stage 0 testicular cancer, the cancer has not spread beyond the small tubes inside your testicles, called the seminiferous tubules.
  • Stage 1: In stage 1 testicular cancer, the cancer may have spread outside of your testicle but has not reached your lymph nodes.
  • Stage 2: In stage 2, the cancer has spread to lymph nodes in your abdomen or lower back.
  • Stage 3: Stage 3 testicular cancer has either spread to distant lymph nodes or other distant body parts.
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Stage 2 testicular cancer can be found anywhere in your testicle. It may have spread to other structures, like your scrotum or spermatic cord.

Stage 2 testicular cancer has also spread into at least one nearby lymph node but not to distant body parts, like your lungs or brain.

Stage 2 testicular cancer can be further divided into substages using the TNM staging system depending on:

  • the extent of the tumor
  • whether it has spread to lymph nodes
  • whether it has spread to distant body parts
  • whether tumor markers are elevated on a blood test
Stage Description
Stage 2The tumor may have grown outside of your testicle, or its extent can’t be assessed. The cancer has spread to at least 1 nearby lymph node. Tumor marker blood test results aren’t available.
Stage 2AThe tumor may have grown outside your testicle, or its extent can’t be assessed. The cancer has spread to at least 1 nearby lymph node but not more than 5. None of your lymph nodes are larger than 2 cm (0.8 in) across. One or more tumor markers may be slightly elevated.
Stage 2BThe tumor may have grown outside your testicle, or its extent can’t be assessed. The cancer has spread to at least 1 lymph node that’s 2–5 cm (0.8–2 in) across, has grown outside of a lymph node, or has spread to more than 5 lymph nodes. One or more tumor markers may be slightly elevated.
Stage 2CThe tumor may have grown outside your testicle, or its extent can’t be assessed. The cancer has spread to at least 1 lymph node that’s bigger than 5 cm (2 in) across. One or more tumor markers may be slightly elevated.

Is stage 2 testicular cancer curable?

Stage 2 testicular cancer is often curable. Doctors sometimes consider your cancer cured if all signs and symptoms of your cancer disappear for at least 5 years.

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The most common initial symptom of testicular cancer is a painless lump in your testicle.

Other symptoms can include:

  • feeling of heaviness in your abdomen or scrotum
  • testicular pain or swelling
  • breast growth or soreness
  • low back or abdominal pain
  • early puberty, in boys

Learn more about testicular cancer symptoms.

How quickly does testicular cancer spread?

The rate at which testicular cancer spreads varies between people.

More than 90% of testicular cancers are germ cell cancers. These cancers are divided into seminoma or nonseminoma tumors. Nonseminoma tumors typically spread quicker.

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The goal of stage 2 testicular cancer treatment is usually to cure your cancer.

Treatment for seminoma tumors small than 5 centimeters (cm), or 2 inches (in), across may include:

  • surgery to remove your testicle followed by radiation therapy to nearby lymph nodes
  • a combination of chemotherapy medications
  • surgery to remove your testicle and nearby lymph nodes

For larger seminoma tumors, you may receive:

  • surgery to remove your testicle followed by a combination of chemotherapy medications or radiation therapy to nearby lymph nodes with long-term follow-up

Radiation therapy is usually less effective at treating nonseminoma tumors. Treatment for nonseminomas often includes:

  • surgery to remove your testicle and lymph nodes with long-term follow-up
  • surgery to remove your testicle and lymph nodes, followed by a combination of chemotherapy medications and long-term follow-up
  • surgery to remove your testicle followed by a combination of chemotherapy medications and a second surgery if cancer remains
  • a combination of chemotherapy medications before surgery to remove your testicle if your cancer is thought to be life threatening

Learn more about testicular cancer treatment.

Can you live 20 years after a testicular cancer diagnosis?

Testicular cancer has one of the more favorable outlooks of any type of cancer.

Many people with stage 2 testicular cancer live more than 20 years, and their cancer never affects their life span.

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In the United States from 2013–2019, people with a diagnosis of testicular cancer that spread to nearby tissues had a 5-year relative survival of 96%. This means these people lived at least 5 years 96% as often as people without the cancer.

You’ll need to receive regular testing for at least 5 years, even if your treatment is successful, to make sure your cancer does not come back. Studies have reported relapse rates for stage 2 seminoma tumors ranging from 9–24%.

Stage 2 testicular cancer may have spread beyond your testicle and into nearby lymph nodes. It has not yet spread into distant tissues.

Most stage 2 testicular cancers can be successfully treated. It’s important to talk with a doctor if you develop any signs and symptoms of testicular cancer, such as an enlarged testicle.

The outlook for testicular cancer tends to be better the earlier it’s treated.