Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood neurodevelopmental disorders. It affects up to 5 percent of kids in the United States.

According to the American Psychiatric Association (APA), approximately 2.5 percent of adults also live with this disorder. Males are three times more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than females.

Children and adults with ADHD may deal with impulse control, hyperactivity, and issues paying attention for extended periods of time. Left untreated, it can disrupt one’s ability to process, understand, and learn information.

Numerous resources and treatments — such as medication and behavioral therapy — can help those with ADHD live fulfilling and productive lives. There are also a number of organizations, resources, and educational tools — like the ones below — that can help those with ADHD and their friends and family.

Nonprofit organizations can be a helpful resource, offering useful information about ADHD, as well as information for friends and family members.

Below are organizations that provide resources for children and adults living with ADHD. Nonprofit organizations located in Canada and the United Kingdom are also included.

Online resources provide information about the signs and symptoms of ADHD, as well as current research studies that discuss new ways to manage and treat the disorder.

Resource guides can be especially helpful for parents. These tools describe how ADHD can affect a child’s ability to learn in the classroom and equip parents with knowledge to better support their children at home and school.

Advocacy groups can help people with ADHD, as well as their loved ones, feel empowered. The organizations listed below highlight various ways to get involved in community outreach (both in the United States and abroad) and advocacy projects.

Support groups provide a safe space for parents of children with ADHD and adults with ADHD to connect with others who understand what they’re going through. Support groups can also be therapeutic for loved ones.

Online forums allow individuals to virtually connect with group members and offer convenient access to a supportive community at any time.

Reading books as a way to learn more about ADHD can be a form of therapy, known as bibliotherapy. Books teaching specific tools that help children and adults manage their ADHD can be especially informative.

Check out some great ones below:

Healthline and our partners may receive a portion of revenues if you make a purchase using a link above.


Juli Fraga is a licensed psychologist based in San Francisco, California. She graduated with a PsyD from University of Northern Colorado and attended a postdoctoral fellowship at UC Berkeley. Passionate about women’s health, she approaches all her sessions with warmth, honesty, and compassion. See what she’s up to on Twitter.