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Generic Name:

prednisolone, Oral tablet

Generic Name:
Millipred,Millipred DP,Millipred DP 12-Day,Millipred DP 6 Day

prednisolone, Oral tablet

All Brands

  • Millipred
  • Millipred DP (Discontinued)
  • Millipred DP 12-Day
  • Millipred DP 6 Day
A discontinued drug is a drug that has been taken off the market due to safety issues, shortage of raw materials, or low market demand.
SECTION 1 of 4

Highlights for prednisolone

Oral tablet
1

Prednisolone is an oral drug used to treat endocrine, rheumatic, blood, and skin disorders; lupus; allergic states; eye problems; certain cancers; multiple sclerosis; and more.

2

Common side effects include high blood pressure, muscle weakness, upset stomach, increased blood sugar levels, weight gain, and pressure in your eyes.

3

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day. Dosage depends on the condition you’re treating.

4

This medication needs to be stopped slowly. Your doctor may gradually decrease your dose. If you stop taking it suddenly, it can cause severe effects such as severe fatigue, weakness, low blood pressure, body aches and pain, fever, confusion, or coma.

5

Prednisolone can weaken your immune system. This means that you may catch infections more easily. Sometimes these infections can be severe.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Risk of infections

Don’t take this drug if you have a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection. This medication may mask symptoms of infections. It may also make it easier for you to catch new infections. Try to avoid being near people who are sick or who have recently been sick, especially with illnesses such as chickenpox or measles.

Live vaccine warning

Don’t receive any live vaccines while you’re taking prednisolone. The vaccine may not fully protect you from the disease. Examples of live vaccines include:

  • nasal spray flu vaccine
  • chickenpox and shingles vaccine
  • measles, mumps and rubella vaccine

Allergic reaction warning

Don’t take this medication if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to prednisolone, including:

  • skin rash
  • hives
  • swelling of your lips, face, or tongue
  • difficulty breathing

What is prednisolone?

Prednisolone is a prescription drug. It’s available in these forms: oral tablet, oral solution, oral suspension, oral delayed-release tablet, and disintegrating tablet.

Prednisolone is available in its generic form. Generic drugs usually cost less. In some cases they may not be available in every strength and form as the brand. Talk to your healthcare provider to see if the generic will work for you.

Why it's used

Prednisolone is used to help decrease inflammation in your body.

It’s used to treat:

  • endocrine disorders:
    • primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency

See Details

How it works

Prednisolone is a steroid hormone. It works by decreasing inflammation or suppressing your body’s immune system.

It blocks the movement of certain inflammatory cells in your body. This helps decrease inflammation.

Why It's Used

Prednisolone is used to help decrease inflammation in your body.

It’s used to treat:

  • endocrine disorders:
    • primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency
  • rheumatic disorders:
    • rheumatoid arthritis
    • ankylosing spondylitis
    • osteoarthritis
  • collagen disorders:
    • lupus
  • dermatologic disorders:
    • dermatitis
    • Steven-Johnson syndrome
    • severe psoriasis
  • allergic states:
    • bronchial asthma
    • drug hypersensitivity
    • allergic rhinitis
  • eye disorders:
    • allergic conjunctivitis
  • respiratory states:
    • symptomatic sarcoidosis
  • blood disorders:
    • red blood cell anemia
    • autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • certain cancers:
    • lymphomas
    • leukemias
  • stomach disorders:
    • ulcerative colitis
  • nerve disorders:
    • multiple sclerosis
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SECTION 2 of 4

prednisolone Side Effects

Oral tablet

Most Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with prednisolone include:

  • retaining salt and water, which may lead to high blood pressure

  • losing potassium, which can lead to:

    • muscle pain and weakness
    • abnormal heart rate
  • thinning skin or acne

  • headache

  • nausea

  • weight gain

  • increased appetite

  • muscle weakness

  • restlessness

  • difficulty sleeping

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening, or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • severe allergic reactions. Symptoms may include:
    • skin rash
    • itching or hives
    • swelling of your lips, face, or tongue
    • difficulty breathing
  • changes in emotions or moods
  • changes in vision, including glaucoma
  • eye pressure or pain
  • slowed bone growth in children
  • deposits of fatty tissue on your body. Symptoms may include:
    • a full, rounded face ("moon face")
    • a hump on your back ("buffalo hump")
  • increased blood sugar levels in people with and without existing diabetes. Symptoms may include:
    • more frequent urination
    • extreme thirst
    • extreme hunger
    • confusion
    • feeling sleepy
    • breath that smells like fruit
  • weak, fragile bones (osteoporosis)
  • stomach ulcer or bleeding. Symptoms may include:
    • severe stomach pain
    • black tarry (sticky) stools
    • vomiting up blood
  • inflamed pancreas (pancreatitis). Symptoms may include:
    • severe upset stomach or pain
    • vomiting
    • severe back pain
  • convulsions (seizures)
  • infection. Symptoms may include:
    • fever
    • chills
    • cough
    • pain with urination
    • skin wounds that will not heal
    • sore throat
  • low potassium levels. Symptoms may include:
    • feeling very weak or tired
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

Prednisolone does not cause drowsiness.

Mild side effects may go away within a couple of weeks. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if they’re more severe or don’t go away.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.
SECTION 3 of 4

prednisolone May Interact with Other Medications

Oral tablet

Prednisolone can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. That’s why your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. If you’re curious about how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Note: You can reduce your chances of drug interactions by having all of your prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy. That way, a pharmacist can check for possible drug interactions.

Alcohol Interaction

Your body processes alcohol and prednisolone in similar ways. If you drink alcohol, this drug might take longer to leave your body. This can lead to worse side effects. Talk to your doctor if you drink alcohol.

Medications That Might Interact with This Drug

Heart drugs

Prednisolone may lower the level of potassium in your body. This could cause changes in your heart rhythm if you’re currently taking any of these medications:

  • amiodarone
  • dofetilide
  • procainamide
  • sotalol

Prednisolone may raise your risk of an irregular heart rate or cause the amounts of digoxin in your blood to increase. This puts you at risk for more side effects. Signs of too much digoxin include changes in vision, dizziness, or nausea.

  • digoxin

Antifungal drugs
  • itraconazole
  • ketoconazole
  • voriconazole

These drugs may increase the levels of prednisolone in your blood, which can cause more side effects.

Fungal infection drug
  • amphotericin B

This drug may cause you to lose too much potassium. Symptoms may include muscle pain and weakness or an abnormal heart rate.

Water pills (diuretics)
  • furosemide
  • hydrochlorothiazide

These drugs may cause you to lose too much potassium. Symptoms may include muscle pain and weakness, or an abnormal heart rate.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • aspirin
  • ibuprofen
  • naproxen

Aspirin may not work as well when combined with prednisolone. Combining prednisolone with NSAIDs can increase stomach and intestine side effects. You may be at a higher risk for ulcers and bleeding.

Blood thinners
  • warfarin

Combining this drug with prednisolone may increase or decrease the blood thinning effects of warfarin. Your doctor may need to adjust your dose.

Diabetes drugs
  • oral drugs, such as glipizide, glimepiride, pioglitazone, sitagliptin, saxagliptin
  • insulin

Diabetes drugs may not work as well, and your doctor may need to increase your dose.

Barbiturates
  • phenobarbital
  • secobarbital
  • pentobarbital

These drugs may decrease the levels of prednisolone in your blood, and it might not work as well. Your doctor may need to increase your prednisolone dose. If you stop taking any of these medications while you’re taking prednisolone, your doctor may need to adjust your dose.

Immunity suppressing drug
  • cyclosporine

This drug may increase the levels of prednisolone and cyclosporine in your body. There have been cases of convulsions (seizures) with this combination.

Antibiotics
  • rifampin
  • rifabutin

This drug may decrease the levels of prednisolone in your blood, and it might not work as well. Your doctor may need to increase your prednisolone dose.

Seizure drugs
  • phenytoin
  • fosphenytoin
  • phenobarbital

These drugs may decrease the levels of prednisolone in your blood, and it might not work as well. Your doctor may need to increase your prednisolone dose.

Female hormones
  • estrogen
  • estrogen-containing contraceptives

These drugs may increase the amount of prednisolone in your blood. Your doctor may need to decrease your prednisolone dose.

Live vaccines
  • nasal spray flu vaccine
  • chickenpox and shingles vaccines
  • measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine

Prednisolone may weaken your immune system. This means that the vaccine may not fully protect you from the disease. Don’t receive a live vaccine while you’re taking this medication without first checking with your doctor.

Non-live vaccines
  • tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine (Daptacel or DTaP)
  • hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B or Recombinant B)
  • pneumonia vaccine (Pneumovax 23 or Prevnar 13)
  • intramuscular flu vaccine

These vaccines may not work as well if you’re taking prednisolone.

Mifepristone

Don’t take mifepristone with prednisolone. It can block the effect of prednisolone and make it ineffective.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.
Prednisolone Warnings
Infection
People with infections

This includes tuberculosis (TB). Taking prednisolone can make an infection worse. It can also cause TB to come back if you’ve had it before. Let your doctor know if you’ve ever had TB. Also tell your doctor about any symptoms of an infection such as fever, chills, or body aches.

People with glaucoma

Taking prednisolone for a long time may increase the pressure in your eyes, causing damage to your eyes and vision. Your risk for other eye infections also increases while you’re taking this medication. Let your doctor know if you have glaucoma or any other eye diseases.

People with ocular herpes simplex

Taking prednisolone may cause small holes in the outer layer of your eye (cornea). Let your doctor know if you have ocular herpes simplex.

heart disease
People with heart disease

This includes high blood pressure and heart failure. Taking prednisolone makes you retain salt and water. This can cause your blood pressure to increase or make heart failure worse. Let your doctor know if you have any heart problems.

diabetes
People with diabetes

Taking prednisolone can increase your blood sugar levels. Monitor your blood sugars more closely. Your doctor may need to increase the doses of your diabetes medications.

intestine problems
People with stomach and intestine problems

This includes ulcers. Taking prednisolone may increase your risk for more ulcers, bleeds, or holes in your stomach and intestines. Let your doctor know if you have a history of stomach and intestine problems.

People with osteoporosis

Taking prednisolone for a long time may make osteoporosis worse and increase your risk for fractures. Let your doctor know if you have a history of osteoporosis.

liver
People with liver disease

If you have liver disease, the effects of prednisolone may be increased, and you might need to take a lower dose. Let your doctor know if you have a history of liver disease.

People with hypothyroidism

If you have hypothyroidism, the effects of prednisolone may be increased. You might need to take a lower dose. Let your doctor know if you have a history of thyroid disease.

People with mood disorders

This includes depression. Prednisolone may cause mood swings, personality changes, trouble sleeping, severe depression, or psychoses. Let your doctor know if you have a history of depression or other mood disorders.

seizures
People with seizures

Prednisolone may cause seizures. Your doctor will monitor you to make sure it doesn’t make your seizures worse.

People with Cushing’s syndrome

If you have Cushing’s syndrome, taking more steroid hormones such as prednisolone can make your symptoms worse.

Pregnant women
Pregnant women

Prednisolone is a category C or category D pregnancy drug, depending on the form you take.

In category D drugs:

  1. Studies show a risk of adverse effects to the fetus when the mother takes the drug.
  2. This drug should only be used during pregnancy in serious cases where it's needed to treat a dangerous condition in the mother.

In category C drugs:

  1. Research in animals has shown adverse effects to the fetus when the mother takes the drug.
  2. There haven’t been enough studies done in humans to be certain how the drug might affect the fetus.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Prednisolone should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Women who are nursing
Women who are nursing

Prednisolone passes through breast milk in small amounts. It isn’t known what effect this will have on the breastfeeding baby.

You and your doctor may need to decide whether you’ll take prednisolone or breastfeed.

Seniors
For Seniors

If you’re an older adult, you may not be able to clear this drug from your body as easily. More of the drug might stay in your body, increasing your risk for side effects.

Children
For Children

Prednisolone may cause slowed growth in children. They might not grow as tall if they take prednisolone long term. Your doctor may monitor your child’s growth rate.

Allergies
Allergies

Prednisolone can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your throat or tongue
  • hives

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal.

SECTION 4 of 4

How to Take prednisolone (Dosage)

Oral tablet

All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dose, form, and how often you take it will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

What Are You Taking This Medication For?

Endocrine disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Rheumatic disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Collagen disorder
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Dermatologic disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Allergic states
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Eye disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Respiratory states
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Hematologic disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Certain cancers
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Stomach disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Nerve disorders
Form: Oral Tablet
Strengths: 5 mg
Form: Oral Solution
Strengths: 5 mg/5 mL, 10 mg/5 mL, 15 mg/5 mL, 20 mg/5 mL, and 25 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Suspension
Strengths: 15 mg/5 mL
Form: Oral Disintegrating Tablet
Strengths: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg
Adult Dosage (ages 18-64 years)

The recommended dose can vary from 5–60 mg per day, depending on the condition you’re treating.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

For infants and children, the dose is based on the child’s age and weight or body surface area, the condition being treated, and the child’s response. If your child is going to be on this medication long term, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to give prednisolone every other day.

Senior Dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The lowest effective adult dose should be used. The appropriate dose will be based on the reason you’re using prednisolone and how you respond to it. For some conditions, giving prednisolone every other day may be appropriate.

Warnings

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose to control the condition that is being treated. Higher doses might be used in some people. When your doctor decides that you no longer need the drug, your dose will be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

Prednisone comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed by your doctor.

If You Stop Taking It

Don’t change your dose or stop taking prednisolone without talking with your doctor first. Stopping the medication suddenly can disrupt your body’s hormones. This can lead to severe side effects, especially if you’ve been on high doses for a long time. Your dose should always be decreased slowly.

If You Take Too Much

If you take too much prednisolone, you may develop:

  • high blood pressure
  • swelling
  • loss of potassium
  • ncreased appetite
  • noticeable, unexplained weight gain

Call your doctor or get emergency medical help right away if you take or think you’ve taken too much or if you have any of these symptoms.

What to Do If You Miss a Dose

Take a missed dose as soon as possible. If it’s almost time for your next dose, wait until then and take a single dose.

Don’t double the dose to try to catch up. This could result in toxic side effects.

How to Tell If the Drug Is Working

Ask your doctor how to tell if the drug is working. The signs depend on the condition being treated.

Prednisolone is a short-term drug treatment.

Prednisolone should be used at the lowest effective dose for the condition being treated. Doses should be decreased slowly to avoid side effects.

Cutting or crushing depends on the form you’re taking

  • Don’t break prednisolone orally disintegrating tablets. Don’t take these tablets if they’ve already been broken.
  • The oral disintegrating tablet needs to be removed from the blister pack right before you take it. Open the blister pack and place the tablet on your tongue. You can swallow the tablet whole or let it dissolve in your mouth, with or without water.
  • Oral disintegrating tablets fall apart easily and should not be cut, split, or broken.
  • The regular prednisolone tablets, not the disintegrating ones, can be crushed if needed.

Storage temperatures depend on the form

Some brands of this drug need to be stored in a refrigerator. Other brands need to be stored at room temperature. If you have questions about how your prednisolone solution should be stored, refer to the information you received with the product or ask your pharmacist.

Oral tablets:

  • Store in temperatures from 68–77°F (20–25°C).
  • Keep the container tightly closed.
  • Protect it from moisture.

Oral disintegrating tablets:

  • Store in temperatures from 68–77°F (20–25°C).
  • Protect it from moisture.
  • Store it in the blister pack.

Oral suspension:

  • Store in temperatures from 68–77°F (20–25°C).
  • Do not refrigerate it.

Oral solution (Pediapred):

  • Store the drug between 39 and 77°F (4–25°C).
  • The solution may be refrigerated.

Oral solution (Veripred, Orapred):

  • Store it in the refrigerator between 36 and 46°F (2–8°C).

Other oral solution:

  • Store the drug between 68 and 77°F (20–25°C).
  • Do not refrigerate it.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Always carry it with you or in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t hurt this medication.
  • You may need to show your pharmacy’s preprinted label to identify the medication. Keep the prescription-labeled box with you when traveling.

Clinical Monitoring

Your doctor may do tests to check your health and make sure the drug is working for you. These tests include:

  • blood tests, such as:
    • blood sugar tests. Prednisolone can increase your blood sugar levels and risk for diabetes.
    • serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, calcium). Prednisolone works by helping you keep salt in your body, and you may lose potassium and calcium.
  • bone density tests. Prednisolone can increase your risk for osteoporosis, because it causes you to lose more calcium.
  • eye tests. Prednisolone can increase the pressure inside of your eyes and lead to glaucoma.

Your Diet

You may need to decrease your salt intake while taking this medication. You might also need to take potassium and calcium supplements.

The generic version is usually stocked in the pharmacy

However, the brand name medication might not be stocked. Call ahead of time.

Insurance

Many insurance companies will require a prior authorization before they approve the prescription and pay for brand names.

Are There Any Alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be more suitable for you than others. Talk to your doctor about possible alternatives.


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Content developed in collaboration with University of Illinois-Chicago, Drug Information Group

Medically reviewed by Creighton University, Center for Drug Information and Evidence-Based Practice on May 20, 2016

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.
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