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Generic Name:

Golimumab, Injectable solution

Generic Name: Golimumab, Injectable solution

All Brands

  • Simponi Aria
SECTION 1 of 4

Highlights for Simponi Aria

Injectable solution
1

Simponi Aria is a rheumatoid arthritis drug injected by a healthcare provider, usually every 8 weeks.

2

Common side effects include upper respiratory infections, viral infections, bronchitis, high blood pressure, and skin rash.

3

Simponi Aria can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Some people develop serious infections while taking Simponi Aria. Your doctor should test you for tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis B before starting Simponi Aria. Your doctor will also monitor you closely for signs and symptoms of TB during treatment.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

FDA warning

This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects.

Risk of infection. This drug can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Some people develop serious infections while taking golimumab. These may include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria.

Your doctor may test you for TB before starting golimumab. They may monitor you closely for symptoms during treatment with the drug even if you tested negative for TB.

Your doctor may check you for symptoms of any type of infection before, during, and after your treatment with golimumab. Don’t start taking the drug if you have any kind of infection without checking with your doctor first.

Risk of cancer. There have been cases of unusual cancers in people under 18 years old who have taken this type of medication.

This medication increases risk of lymphoma and other cancers. People with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis, especially those with very active disease, may be more likely to get lymphoma.

Hepatitis B warning

If you carry the hepatitis B virus, it can become active while you use this drug and damage your liver. Your doctor may do blood tests before you start treatment, while you’re taking this drug, and for several months after you stop.

Vaccine warning

Don’t receive a live vaccine while taking golimumab and for at least 3 months after stopping the medication. Examples of live vaccines are live flu vaccine and shingles (varicella-zoster) vaccine. A live vaccine may not fully protect you from disease while you’re taking this drug.

Congestive heart failure

This drug can cause heart failure. This condition may need to be treated in a hospital and may be fatal (cause death). Call your doctor right away if you have any signs of heart failure. Symptoms can include shortness of breath, swelling of your lower legs or feet, and sudden weight gain. If you already have heart failure, your doctor will monitor you closely because this drug can make your condition worse.

What is Simponi Aria?

This drug is an injectable solution given by a healthcare provider in a hospital or clinical setting. You won’t inject this drug on your own.

This drug may be used as part of a combination therapy. That means you may need to take it with other drugs.

Why it's used

This drug is used with a medication called methotrexate to help reduce signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It’s also used to stop RA from getting worse and to improve the condition.

How it works

This drug works by blocking a substance called tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha).

More Details

How it works

This drug works by blocking a substance called tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha). This medication and others like it belong to a class of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers.

TNF is normally found in your body. If you have an autoimmune disease that causes your body to make too much TNF, this drug can work to block the excessive TNF. This keeps it from causing inflammation and other symptoms of your autoimmune disease in your body.

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SECTION 2 of 4

Simponi Aria Side Effects

Injectable solution

More Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with Simponi Aria include:

  • upper respiratory infections. Report any symptoms of infection to your doctor, even if they’re mild. Symptoms may include:

    • runny nose
    • sore throat
    • hoarseness or laryngitis
  • viral infections, such as flu and cold sores

  • bronchitis

  • high blood pressure

  • skin rash

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • upper respiratory infections. Report any symptoms of infection to your doctor, even if they’re mild. Symptoms may include:

    • runny nose
    • sore throat
    • hoarseness or laryngitis
  • viral infections, such as flu and cold sores

  • heart failure. Symptoms may include:

    • shortness of breath
    • swelling of your lower legs or feet
    • sudden weight gain
  • nervous system problems. Symptoms may include:

    • vision changes, such as blurred vision or double vision
    • weakness in your arms or legs
    • numbness or tingling in any part of your body
  • blood problems. Symptoms may include:

    • fever
    • bruising or bleeding easily
    • pale-looking skin
  • allergic reactions, including:

    • hives
    • swollen face
    • difficulties breathing
    • chest pain
  • hepatitis B and liver problems. Symptoms may include:

    • tiredness
    • dark colored urine
    • skin or whites of the eyes that look yellow
    • little or no appetite
    • vomiting
    • muscle aches
    • clay-colored stools
    • fevers
    • chills
    • stomach discomfort or pain on the right side of your stomach
    • skin rash
  • Cancer. Certain kinds of cancer have been reported in people using Simponi Aria. However, it isn’t known if this drug increases your cancer risk. Symptoms of some types of cancer include:

    • fatigue
    • fever
    • weight loss
    • unusual skin growths
    • changes in skin appearance
    • flesh-colored or bluish-red lumps, often on your face, head, or neck
  • Heart failure. Symptoms may include:

    • shortness of breath
    • fatigue
    • weight gain
    • fluid buildup in your legs
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

This drug doesn’t cause drowsiness.

Injection site reactions are common after receiving a dose. This may include pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site. Call your doctor right away if you have a reaction that doesn’t go away within a few days or gets worse.

Mild side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist If they’re more severe or don’t go way.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.
SECTION 3 of 4

Simponi Aria May Interact with Other Medications

Injectable solution

Simponi Aria can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. Your healthcare provider will look out for interactions with your current medications. Always be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, herbs, or vitamins you’re taking.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.
Drug warnings
serious infections
People with infections

Tell your doctor if you have any kind of infection, even if it’s small, such as an open cut or sore that looks infected. Your body may have a harder time fighting off the infection while you’re taking this drug.

tuberculosis
People with tuberculosis

This drug affects your immune system and may make it easier for you to get tuberculosis (TB). Your doctor may test you for TB. If you’re at risk for TB, you may be treated for it before you begin and during treatment with this drug.

hepatitis B
People with hepatitis B virus infection

If you carry the hepatitis B virus, it can become active while you use golimumab and damage your liver. Your doctor may do blood tests before you start treatment, while you’re taking this drug, and for several months after you stop.

heart failure
People with heart failure

This medication may make symptoms of heart failure worse. Call your doctor right away if you get symptoms of worsening heart failure, such as shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain.

pregnant women
Pregnant women

This drug is a pregnancy category B drug. That means two things:

  1. Studies of the drug in pregnant animals have not shown risk to the fetus.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in pregnant women to show the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

breastfeeding
Women who are breast-feeding

This drug passes into breast milk in small amounts. It isn’t known what effect this will have on a breastfeeding baby. You and your doctor may decide whether you’ll take this drug or breastfeed.

seniors
For seniors

If you’re over the age of 65 years, you may be at higher risk for a serious infection or certain types of cancers while taking this drug.

children
For children

The safety and effectiveness of this drug haven’t been established in people younger than 18 years old.

telephone
When to call the doctor

Call your doctor right away if you:

  • have an infection
  • have cancer or have had cancer in the past
  • have heart failure
  • have a condition that affects your nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis
  • have recently received or are scheduled to receive a vaccine
SECTION 4 of 4

How to Take Simponi Aria (Dosage)

Injectable solution

Your doctor will determine a dose that’s right for you based on your individual needs. Your general health may affect your dose. Tell your doctor about all health conditions you have before your doctor or nurse administers the drug to you.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

This drug comes with risks if you don’t receive it as your doctor prescribes.

If you don't receive it at all

Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive condition. This means it can get worse over time, especially when it’s left untreated. Receiving your medications as directed by your doctor, even when you’re feeling well, will give you the best chance of managing your disease and improving your quality of life.

If you stop or miss doses

If you stop taking this drug or miss doses, your rheumatoid arthritis may get worse.

What to do if you miss a dose/appointment

If you miss a dose or appointment, ask your doctor when to schedule your next appointment.

How to tell if the drug is working

You may be able to tell if this drug is working if you have less joint pain and are able to move better.

This is a long-term medication.

How long does it take?

This drug takes about 30 minutes to receive.

Can I drive home after?

This medication shouldn’t make it more difficult to drive home after the treatment.

Travel

Tell your doctor if you plan to travel. This drug is given every 8 weeks. Talk to your doctor about your travel plans and determine if they will affect your dosing schedule.

Clinical monitoring

Tuberculosis test: Your doctor may test you for tuberculosis before starting this drug and check you closely for signs and symptoms while you take it.

Hepatitis B virus infection test: If you carry the hepatitis B virus, your doctor may do blood tests before you start treatment, while you’re receiving this drug, and for several months after you stop.

Insurance

Many insurance companies will require a prior authorization before they approve the prescription and pay for this drug.


Show Sources

Content developed in collaboration with University of Illinois-Chicago, Drug Information Group

Medically reviewed by Creighton University, Center for Drug Information and Evidence-Based Practice on May 3, 2017

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.
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