Retinopathy means damage to the retina, a layer of light-sensitive nerve tissue lining the back of ...
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Retinopathy means damage to the retina, a layer of light-sensitive nerve tissue lining the back of the eye. The retina is filled with tiny blood vessels called capillaries. They carry blood containing oxygen and nutrients to the retina. Too much sugar in your blood can cause changes to these blood vessels, which can lead to vision problems and even blindness. There are several types of diabetic retinopathy. In its most severe form, new, fragile blood vessels grow in the retina. They sometimes grow into the vitreous, the clear jelly-like substance that fills the center of your eye. These fragile blood vessels may leak or bleed. Small scars can develop on the retina and in the vitreous. Diabetic retinopathy can occur in people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Early on, there may be no symptoms. But as it progresses, diabetic retinopathy can cause many vision problems including blurred vision, difficulty seeing at night, spots or floaters, dark or empty areas in your vision, and eventually, total vision loss. It is important for anyone with diabetes to have their eyes checked regularly, and for anyone with ongoing vision problems to be checked out by a doctor.

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