Motion sickness can occur when you travel by car, train, boat or airplane. When your brain receives...
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Motion sickness can occur when you travel by car, train, boat or airplane. When your brain receives conflicting signals from your eyes, inner ears, muscles and joints you begin to feel queasy and sweaty. For example, if you're reading while sitting in a car your eyes may not sense motion but your inner ear can detect that you are moving. This disturbance originates from the labyrinth of the inner ear - the mechanism that controls balance. The inner ear - which contains, fluid and hair-like sensors linked to nerves - send a message to the brain that does not match what the eyes are seeing or the body is experiencing. Symptoms of motion sickness include: Dizziness Cold sweat Paleness Nausea Vomiting There are a number of ways to reduce or treat the effects of motion sickness: Maintain good air circulation. Don't stay below deck in a boat or look out the window in an airplane. Close your eyes if you begin to feel nauseous. Avoid reading or using a computer while in motion. Avoid alcohol. Consume ginger. Eat small amounts of low-fat, starchy foods such as soda crackers. Consider using over the counter medication or a skin patch if you will be on a boat or plane for a long period of time. Motion sickness usually goes away after you stop engaging in the activity that caused it. If you experience severe motion sickness, consult a doctor. You may require surgery or a prescription for a stronger medication.

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