The metacarpals are the long bones in the hand. If your child has a fifth metacarpal fracture, als...
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The metacarpals are the long bones in the hand. If your child has a fifth metacarpal fracture, also called a boxer's fracture, the bone in the hand that attaches to the pinky finger has a crack or break. The most common causes are hitting a hard object with a closed fist or falling onto the hand. If the fracture is at the growth plate near the end of the bone, bone growth can be affected and may require special X-rays or other tests. Young bones are more flexible than an adult's, so a child's bone may crack or just buckle without a clear break instead of snapping like a dry stick. Your child's healthcare provider will straighten the broken bone if it is crooked. Your child will then wear a cast or splint from the hand to the forearm for 4 to 6 weeks.

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