If your child has a knee fracture, it means there is a break or crack in one of the bones that make...
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If your child has a knee fracture, it means there is a break or crack in one of the bones that make up the knee joint. These bones include the upper leg bone or femur, the bones in the lower leg bones - the tibia and fibula--and the kneecap. If the fracture is at the growth plate near the ends of the bone, bone growth can be affected and may require special X-rays or other tests. Young bones are more flexible than an adult's, so a child's bone may crack or just buckle without a clear break instead of snapping like a dry stick. Surgery may be needed if the broken bone is crooked; wires, pins, screws, metal plates or rods may be used to hold the straightened bones together. Treatment of a knee fracture may require wearing a splint until swelling is reduced, followed by a cast for 4 to 8 weeks. Your child may need to use crutches for several weeks.

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