Cholesterol Video

Too much cholesterol can be deadly, but it is also one of the essential building blocks of life. Mo...
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Too much cholesterol can be deadly, but it is also one of the essential building blocks of life. Most of the cholesterol in your body is made in your liver from carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. About 25% comes from animal proteins you eat that contain cholesterol, like meat and egg yolks. After food is broken down in the stomach, it moves into the small intestine. Fats, or lipids, are further broken down into particles that can be absorbed into the intestinal lining. Inside the cells lining the intestine, cholesterol is reconfigured into droplets inside a layer of protein to form lipoproteins called chylomicrons. The chylomicrons are released into a network called the lymphatic system, which transports them to the blood stream. They are then carried to the liver, where they are absorbed by cells called hepatocytes. Inside the hepatocytes, the cholesterol is repackaged into forms the body can use, like HDL. These particles are released into the bloodstream to be used by cells throughout the body. A major route for eliminating cholesterol is through secretion into bile as bile acids. Bile helps your body digest fats. It is made in the liver and stored in the gallbladder. When needed, it released into the small intestine to help with digestion.

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