Uncontrolled or Slow Movement (Dystonia) - Healthline
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What causes slow movements? 12 possible conditions

People with dystonia have involuntary muscle contractions that cause slow and repetitive movements. Read more

See a list of possible causes in order from the most common to the least.

1

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder. It first presents with problems of movement. Smooth and coordinated muscle movements of the body are made possible by a substance in the brain calle...

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2

Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain tissue. It's most often caused by viral infections. In some cases, bacterial infections can cause encephalitis.

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3

Encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is a general term describing a disease that affects the function or structure of your brain. There are many types of encephalopathy and brain disease. Some types are permanent and some are temporary. Som...

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4

Stroke Overview

A stroke (a "brain attack") is a medical emergency in which part of the brain is deprived of oxygen. This occurs when an artery that supplies oxygenated blood to the brain becomes damaged and brain cells begin to die.

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5

Brain Aneurysm

This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required.

An aneurysm in the brain is a weak area in an artery in the brain that bulges out and fills with blood. It can be unpredictable and life-threatening, and can cause extremely serious conditions.

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6

Huntington's Disease

Huntington's disease is a hereditary condition in which your brain's nerve cells gradually break down. It can cause physical and psychological symptoms.

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7

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect muscle movement and coordination. Learn about the causes, types, symptoms, and treatment of cerebral palsy.

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8

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required.

Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and the pancreas produces insulin. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time...

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9

Addison’s Disease

Addison's disease occurs when the adrenal cortex is damaged and the adrenal glands do not produce enough of the steroid hormones cortisol and aldosterone.

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10

Addisonian Crisis (Acute Adrenal Crisis)

This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required.

An Addisonian crisis occurs when levels of cortisol suddenly drop. Learn more about an Addisonian crisis, including symptoms, risk factors, and treatment.

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11

Hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus is a condition that occurs when fluid builds up in the skull and causes the brain to swell. The name literally means "water on the brain."

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12

Cocaine and related disorders

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 15 percent of people in the U.S. have tried cocaine. Find out more about the effects of addiction.

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This feature is for informational purposes only and should not be used to diagnose.
Please consult a healthcare professional if you have health concerns.
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