Sign up for our newsletter
Get health tips, wellness advice, and more

Thanks for signing up!
You've been added to our list and will hear from us soon.

See all Healthline's newsletters »
Advertisement
Let's see if we can figure out what's causing your symptoms.
Select additional symptoms and we'll narrow your results.

What causes increase in blood pressure and night time urination? 8 possible conditions

See a list of possible causes in order from the most common to the least.

1

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic condition that affects the chambers of your heart. Learn more about CHF, including symptoms and risk factors.

Read more »

2

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the progressive and irreversible destruction of the kidneys. The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure and diabetes.

Read more »

3

Polycystic Kidney Disease

Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited kidney disorder. It causes fluid-filled cysts to form in the kidneys. It may impair kidney function.

Read more »

4

Glomerulonephritis

Glomerulonephritis is a serious illness that can be life-threatening and requires immediate treatment. The condition is sometimes called nephritis.

Read more »

5

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, you might develop high levels of blood sugar. Learn how this condition, known as gestational diabetes mellitus, is diagnosed and treated.

Read more »

6

Type 2 Diabetes Overview

The things you've wanted to know about type 2 diabetes are all in one place. Learn more about the symptoms, foods to avoid, and lifestyle management.

Read more »

7

Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy

Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease caused by alcohol abuse. Long-term alcohol abuse weakens and thins the heart muscle. The damaged muscle cannot pump blood as it should, which deprives the bod...

Read more »

8

All About Autonomic Dysrelexia (or Hyperreflexia)

Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a condition in which your involuntary nervous system overreacts to stimuli. It's also known as autonomic hyperreflexia.

Read more »

This feature is for informational purposes only and should not be used to diagnose.
Please consult a healthcare professional if you have health concerns.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement