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Wild indigo (Baptisia australis)

treats Respiratory tract infections

Generic Name: Baptisia tinctoria

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Baptisia australis, Baptisia tinctoria (L.) R. B., Baptisia tinctoria (L.) R. Br., Baptisiae tinctoriae radix, blue false indigo, blue wild indigo, Fabaceae (family), horse fly weed, indigo carmine, indigo weed, rattlebush, rattleweed, wild indigo root.

Background

Wild indigo (Baptisia australis) has deep blue to violet flowers, similar to sweet pea flowers. When the plant's sap is exposed to air, it turns purple. Although this sap has been used for dying, it is not as colorfast as true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria). Some Native Americans tribes used a tea of blue indigo root as an emetic (induces vomit) and purgative.

Wild indigo is considered toxic and is on the U. S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) list of toxic plants. However, two studies in humans found no adverse effects when it was used in a combination of Baptisiae tinctoriae radix, Echinaceae pallidae/purpureae radix, and Thujae occidentalis herba. Currently, wild indigo seems most promising as an immunomodulator, as both laboratory studies and clinical studies using combination products have noted some benefit. However, more studies are needed using wild indigo as a monotherapy before its safety and efficacy can be determined.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Respiratory tract infections: Preliminary evidence has shown immunostimulative properties in wild indigo extracts. However, the available clinical studies have been conducted using the combination called Esberitox N (Echinaceae (purpureae et pallidae) radix, Baptisiae tinctoriae radix and Thujae occidentalis herba). Additional study is needed using wild indigo alone to determine effectiveness for respiratory tract infections.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antiviral, emetic (induces vomiting), immunomodulation, laxative (purgative).

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for wild indigo in adults. Wild indigo is considered toxic and is on the U. S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) list of toxic plants.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for wild indigo in children. Wild indigo is considered toxic and is on the U. S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) list of toxic plants.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to wild indigo (Baptisia australis) or its constituents.

Side Effects and Warnings

There is little information available on the adverse effects of wild indigo in the literature. However, when used in a combination of Baptisiae tinctoriae radix, Echinaceae pallidae/purpureae radix, and Thujae occidentalis herba, two studies in humans found no adverse effects. Wild indigo is considered toxic and is on the U. S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) list of toxic plants. Use cautiously in patients on immunosuppressive therapy as wild indigo may be an immunostimulator or immunomodulator.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Wild indigo is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

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